Wallenberg (rev. 1-23-2007--added multiple corrections part)

 

HOW TO DO “BUYBACKS” PACKET 2007

 

Now that you have your paper back, what do you do?

 

FIRST,  STUDY AND RECORD HOW YOU DID ON CONTENT

No matter how much the technical errors bother you, first study how you did in terms of the content requirements on this paper.  After all, content really is the MOST important aspect of any paper.  Do the following:

            1.     On your grading sheet, look carefully over why points were deducted under content.

            2.     Read the teacher comments (positives and suggestions) which deal with content.

            3.     Turn to the pink sheet stapled in your folder and do this:

·    Record your preliminary points and preliminary grade.

·    In the boxes, record the strengths and suggestions given to you.  Feel free to summarize or paraphrase the teacher’s comments.

·    In the far right box, write a goal for the content of the next paper.

 

 

NOW,  SURVEY AND RECORD YOUR TECHNICAL ERRORS 

Do the following:

            1.     On your grading sheet, look carefully over why points were deducted for technical errors.

            2.     Read the comments given by the teacher which apply to technical aspects.

            3.     Turn to the yellow sheet stapled in your folder and do this:

·    Record the number of technical errors of each type.  Note any patterns.

·    Go back to the pink sheet in your folder.  In the far right box, write a goal for the technical aspects of the next paper.

 

 

NEXT,  GET READY TO DO THE BUYBACKS

The buyback system allows you to recapture technical points lost on your paper and gives you the opportunity to identify and learn from your own individual errors.  In order to do this, you will need to gather some or all of the following materials:

            1.     This “HOW TO DO BUYBACKS” packet--blue

            2.     In the SURVIVAL PACKET:

·    EPHS English Dept. CORRECT MANUSCRIPT FORM (msf) “RULES” sheet—yellow

·    GRAMMAR RULES SHEET (a.k.a. Grammar Rules Sheet (GRS)

                 or DOL RULES SHEET)—salmon colored

            3.     OTHER SECTIONS OF THE SURVIVAL PACKET WHICH APPLY TO YOUR ERRORS

 

WHAT CAN I “BUY BACK”?

You can only “buy back” those technical points marked with an abbreviation and a -1 or -2 beside the abbreviations for mechanics and msf.  You may not buy back any CONTENT points.

 

 

HOW MANY POINTS MAY I BE CREDITED BACK?

For the first few papers, I allow you to “buy back” all of the number of mechanics or msf points you lost originally for each error provided that all your corrections are done correctly.  For example, let’s say a paper is worth 70 points.  Out of the 70 points, 20 points were allotted to technical errors.  Suppose you made 30 one-point technical errors.  Those thirty errors amounted to losing all 20 points off your score.  This means you lost the maximum technical points possible.  In order to buy back all 20 points, you will need to correct all thirty errors.  All thirty corrections must be done correctly in order to recapture all 20 points that you lost.  Each correction, then, is worth 1/30th.  Let’s say that 21 of your corrections were done correctly.  You will then be credited 21/30ths  = 70% x 20 points possible = 14 out of the 20 points back.

 

 

WHAT IF I DO NOT FOLLOW THIS BUYBACK PACKET’S INSTRUCTIONS?

                                                    OR

WHAT IF I MAKE NEW ERRORS ON MY BUYBACKS?

You cannot be credited any points for incorrect corrections OR corrections which include NEW ERRORS you make inadvertently OR corrections that do not follow this packet’s instructions for making the corrections.  I will be very firm on this.  GETTING TO DO BUYBACKS TO IMPROVE YOUR GRADE IS A PRIVILEGE, NOT A RIGHT.   My buyback system was designed to help you interact with your own errors to help you understand what you did wrong so you don’t continue to make these same errors.  However, buybacks must be “teacher friendly.”  This means I expect the format and corrections to be easy for me to correct.  Do not turn in “sloppy” buybacks.  Use the template below, do them as neatly as possible (typed or handwritten in your best writing), and PROOFREAD THEM!!!

 

 

HOW DO I ACTUALLY DO THE BUYBACKS?

 

*  STEP 1:   NUMBER YOUR ERRORS

Go to your paper and consecutively number every error that has one of the technical abbreviations and a

-1 or -2 next to it.  USE A MARKER other than green or red to do this.

NOTE:  When I check your corrections against what you did in the paper, I expect to see actual numbers identifying each error in the paper clearly marked so I can easily find them.  If I find that the numbers beside the errors in the text do not match the numbers on the correction sheet, it will be nearly impossible to give you credit.

 

*  STEP 2:   HOW DO I “TITLE” THE BUYBACKS?

At the top of the buybacks, write the original title of your paper and the word “BUYBACKS.”  I encourage you to type your buybacks.

 

*  STEP 3:   HOW DO I SET UP MY PAPER?  USE A SIX-COLUMNED BUYBACK “TEMPLATE”

NOTE:  You do NOT retype your paper or do the corrections on your original paper.  You will make all the corrections on new, separate six-columned sheets of paper.  This is best set up with a table/spreadsheet program printed in LANDSCAPE format so you have plenty of room for each error.  Make your columns deep enough to write long sentences if they are needed.

 

THE SIX-COLUMNED BUYBACK TEMPLATE

 

   Column 1                Column 2            Column 3           Column 4             Column 5         Column 6

SURVIVAL  PACKET

PAGE COLOR, SECTION TITLE, AND RULE #

 

ERROR # (from your paper)

 

 

ERROR TYPE

 

 

POINTS LOST

 

 

CORRECTION

 

 

EXTRA COLUMN

 

Cite the color of the pages you used in the Survival Packet which applies to your error, the exact section title (such as salmon GRS) and the rule # (58).  You must have all three of these clearly and accurately cited to receive the buyback.

 

This is the actual # you gave the error in your paper (in colored pen) when you went through and numbered your errors chronologically as they appeared in your paper.  NOTE:

If you are correcting MSF errors (where you are allowed to correct all of the same type at once), there may be several numbers in this column.

 

This is the abbreviation your teacher gave the error to identify its type (such as “sp”).

 

This is the total number of points you lost for the error (either

-1 or -2 usually).

 

NOTE:

If you are correcting MSF errors (where you are allowed to correct all of the same type at once), this will be the total number of points taken off for all of this type of msf error.

 

This is the correction you are required to make to show you understand what you did wrong.  Sometimes you will merely have to rewrite the original sentence correctly.  Other times you may have to do something else.  You need to do something different for each type of buyback.  SEE THE CHART later in this packet to know exactly what to do for each type of error.

 

Sometimes you will need this column for other special buyback requirements.  For example, you will use this column when you are doing comma buybacks and need to make up a brand new sentence applying the rule you “violated.”

 

HOW DO I TURN IN THE BUYBACKS?

You must turn in the corrections along with the original paper and your writing folder by a due date specified by your teacher.

 

NOTE:  Make sure you have recorded all errors on the yellow sheet in your folder and the score and teacher comments on the pink sheet.  THIS IS MANDATORY to get full credit for buybacks.

 

WHAT IF MY SENTENCE IS REALLY LONG?

You must write the entire sentence out so I do not have to go back and find it in the paper.  You may not use ellipsis points to get out of writing the whole sentence.

 

WHAT IF TWO ERRORS (OR MORE) OCCUR IN THE SAME SENTENCE?

Except for MSF errors and special teacher-approved situations, each error is supposed to be corrected independently!  However, if two (or more) errors occur in the same sentence, you MAY combine errors in one correction and correct them all at once. You will still need to do exactly what is required for each individual error, but in column 5 (where you rewrite the sentence correctly in most cases), you may write the sentence ONCE providing you label where each error is corrected. 

For example, let’s say you typed the following sentence (with 4 errors) in your paper.  Let’s assume that the sentence appears somewhere in the middle of your paper, so your error numbers are 17, 18, 19, 20.

                                                       17 (ew -1)          18  (pc -1)                                                                                      

She displayed similarities with her father but she also maintained her likeness to other famous

       19 (sp -1)               20 (msf -1)

matriarks in history. (Matts 7)

Your errors are (17) using “with” instead of “to”  (-1 ew)

                         (18) forgetting to put a comma before “but” in a CC  (-1 pc)

                         (19) spelling the word “matriarch” wrong (-1 sp)

                         (20) putting the period before instead of after the parenthetical documentation (-1 msf)

                       

Here’s what your buybacks would look like for this complicated correction:

SURVIVAL  PACKET

PAGE COLOR, SECTION TITLE, AND RULE #

 

ERROR # (from your paper)

 

 

ERROR TYPE

 

 

POINTS LOST

 

 

CORRECTION

 

 

 

EXTRA COLUMN

17  NONE

 

 

18  Salmon GRS

         Rule 13

             CC

 

19 Salmon GRS

        Rule 58

 

20 Green  

Parenthetical

Documentation     Section, p. 5,  

at the top

      17

 

 

18

 

 

 

19

 

 

20

 

 

 

ew

 

 

pc

 

 

 

sp

 

 

msf

 

          -1

 

 

-1

 

 

 

-1

 

 

-1

 She displayed

                      17

similarities to

                   18

her father, but she also maintained her likeness to other famous

       19

matriarchs in

                            20

history (Matts 7).

 

 

 

 

 

(19) matriarchs, matriarchs, matriarchs, matriarchs, matriarchs

(17)  with: a function word to indicate a close association

to: a function word to indicate appropriation or possession

(18)  He loved writing papers, but he loathed doing buybacks.

(20)  Sentence punctuation FOLLOWS parenthetical documentation.

 

 

WHAT IS SPECIAL ABOUT “MSF” CORRECTIONS?

Only “MSF” error corrections CAN be combined.  This means that if you make the same MSF error more than once (or even 16 times), you may cover all the errors with only ONE buyback.  For example, let’s say you forgot to paginate on every one of your six pages of your paper.  You lost -1 MSF for each time.  You are allowed to take care of this by doing only one MSF buyback, but you MUST list each number of that type of error in the error number column (such as 1, 4, 12, 15, 16, 20) and be sure to write -6 in the points lost column.

 

*  STEP 4:   “GROUP” THE CORRECTIONS

Group all the same types of corrections together so you can track a pattern of your errors.  For example, group all apostrophe corrections together, all the spelling corrections together, all the capitalization errors together, etc.

 

*  STEP 5:    DO THE BUYBACKS

Follow the directions on the chart on the next page as to the exact way to do each type of specific correction required.

 

*  STEP 6:   TURNING IN BUYBACKS

 

WHEN ARE MY BUYBACKS DUE?

Your due date depends on how many buybacks you have to do and how complicated they are.  This means that your due date may differ from other members of the class.  Be sure to CAREFULLY  check your grading sheet to see when your INDIVIDUAL DATE DUE is.

 

MAY I TURN BUYBACKS IN LATE?

NOTE:  If you “forget” or miss your due date, there will be a deduction for one day late, but you can still turn them in.

BUYBACKS ARE GIVEN ONLY ½ CREDIT IF TURNED IN ONE DATE LATE AND NO CREDIT AFTER ONE DAY LATE.  Two days late (or more) equals NO CREDIT for buybacks!

 

WHAT IF I DECIDE TO ACCEPT MY GRADE AS IT IS NOW AND NOT DO THE BUYBACKS?

If you do not choose to do the buybacks, turn your paper back in (in the folder) on your due date.  Write the following on the front of the first side of your grading sheet:

            “I choose NOT to do buybacks and, therefore, accept my grade as is.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CORRECTION SYMBOLS AND HOW TO MAKE SPECIFIC CORRECTIONS

 

Abb.or Symbol

Explanation

Method for Correction

(in Columns 5 & 6)

agr

agreement:  the subject and verb or the pronoun and its antecedent do not agree.

Ex.  “An athlete must watch his or her diet”

 or “Athletes must watch their diets.”

Rewrite the sentence correctly in column 5.  Put an “S” above the subject and a “V” above the verb.  DO NOT FORGET TO LABEL THESE or no buyback credit.

 

awk

 

awkward phrasing

 

Rewrite the sentence in column 5 so it isn’t awkward anymore.  Underline the part you changed.

 

cap/lc

 

capitalization error

Ex.   She spoke english with King Edward.

 

Rewrite the sentence in column 5 with proper capitalization.

 

FRAG

 

Fragment:  what you thought was a complete sentence was not!  It was missing either a subject or a verb or both!  Or, you started the phrase with a word that makes the sentence incomplete without the next sentence.

Ex.  When I left home.

Ex.  Because of him.

 

1.   In column 5, rewrite the phrase into a complete sentence.

2.   Put an “S” above the subject and a “V” above the verb.  DO NOT FORGET TO LABEL THESE (or no buyback credit!)

 

 

ew

 

Incorrect word choice:  you did not use the “exact word” needed.

 

1.   Look up the correct and incorrect words in the dictionary.

2.   In column 5, rewrite the sentence substituting a new word for the one which wasn’t correct.  Underline the word you substituted.

3.   In column 6, write both words and their respective definitions beside each.

 

H

 

 or

circled   

   H

 

Homonym and

no-excuse homonym:  You used a homonym (a word that sounds the same as the word you meant to use, but it is spelled differently.)

Ex.  He is to tired to do any homework.

 

1.   Look up the correct and incorrect words in the dictionary.

2.   In column 5, rewrite the sentence using the correct word.  Circle it.

3.   In column 6, write both words and their respective definitions beside each.

 

mm

 

Misplaced or dangling modifier—your modifying phrase (usually a prepositional phrase—but not always) being used as an adjective or adverb is in the wrong place.

Ex.  Stuck in the elevator, the firefighters rescued the children.  (The firefighters were not stuck in the elevators!)

Corrected:  Stuck in the elevator, the children were rescued by the firefighters.

 

1.   In column 5, rewrite the sentence putting the phrase in its proper place.

2.   Underline the phrase.

3.   Draw an arrow to the word the phrase is modifying.

 

 

Abb. or Symbol

Explanation

Method for Correction

(in Columns 5 & 6)

 

 

msf

manuscript form:  The correct spacing, margin size, format, etc., was not used.

 

Ex.  I lost 16 pounds last year.

1.   Consult the yellow EPHS English Dept. “CORRECT MANUSCRIPT FORM” rules sheet or orange GRS (“Grammar Rules Sheet”)--both in the SP or any specific handouts given in class that pertain to the error you made.

2.   In column 5, explain what you did incorrectly AND what you should have done instead.

3.   In column 6, give an example of this.  NOTE:  You may combine all msf buybacks of the exact same type.  See page 4 of this packet for an explanation of this.

 

 

 

pc

comma--You either put a comma in for no reason or forgot one.

 

Ex.  He took her to see the Bulls, but never asked her out again. 

       

 I like the Cubs but I don’t like the Sox.

 

       

 

1.   Figure out whether you put a comma in incorrectly or omitted one.  Consult the list of comma rules on the orange GRS (“Grammar Rules Sheet”).

2.   In column 1, give the abbreviation for the rule you should have followed or applied as well as its rule # in the left margin.  Do not merely put “Rule 13.”  Write “CC—rule 13.”

3.   In column 5, write the sentence correctly.

4.   In column 6, construct a brand new, original sentence which uses the rule correctly.

5.  If you have put a comma which doesn’t belong in the sentence, write “NONE” in column 1.  Correct the sentence in column 5.  In column 6 you must explain thoroughly why you thought the comma should or shouldn't be there.  NOTE:  For paired commas, you may buy back both at once.  (See example on page 9.)

 

 

pa

pco

pd or ph

pend

pq

psc

pund

apostrophe

colon

dash/hyphen

endmark

quotation marks

semicolon

underlining

 

For all of these punctuation errors, do the following:

1.   In column 5 rewrite the sentence correctly.

2.   Underline the correction.

 

 

 

Abb. or Symbol

 

 

Explanation

 

 

Method for Correction

 

 

 

pro case

 

You have chosen a subject pronoun when you needed an object pronoun or an object pronoun when you needed a subject pronoun.

Ex.  Sandra sent my sister and I a postcard.

“I” should be “me” because “my sister and me” are objects.  See Pronoun Case rule O1.

Ex.  It’s her who started the argument.

“Her” should be “she” because the pronoun follows a form of the verb “to be.”  See Pronoun Case rule S2.

 

 

1.   In column 5, rewrite the sentence with the correct pronoun choice.

2.   Underline the new pronoun you substituted.

3.   Above the new pronoun, write “SUBJ” if it’s a subject pronoun or “OBJ” if it’s an object pronoun.  Do not forget to label these or no buyback credit.

 

ref

Your reference is unclear.  Usually, a pronoun’s antecedent is not clearly established.

In column 5, rewrite the sentence making the references clearer.

 

 

RO

run-on --  You “ran” or connected two independent clauses with or without a comma.  (In effect, these should have been two separate sentences.  If the two clauses were closely related, they may have been written as one sentence with a semicolon connecting them.)

Ex. David Letterman is a riot  his show is popular.

 

1.   In column 5, rewrite the sentence punctuating it correctly.

2.   Put an “S” above the subject(s) and a “V” above the verb(s).

3.   Cite the rule # that applies.

 

sp

spelling – You misspelled the word!

Ex.  His effect on his girlfriend is incredable.

In column 5, write the word correctly 5 times.  Circle the part of the word that caused you to misspell it.  If a spelling rule applies, cite the rule #!

 

 

circled

   sp

no-excuse spelling --  You misspelled a word included on the NO-EXCUSE SPELLING LIST. 

Ex.  He has a prejudice viewpoint.

In column 5, write the word correctly 15 times.  Circle the part of the word that caused you to misspell it.  If a spelling rule applies, cite it!

 

 

tense

tense – You chose the incorrect verb form.

In column 5, rewrite the sentence using the correct verb tense.  Put an “S” above the subject and a “V” above the verb.

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 SAMPLE BUYBACKS (setting this up landscape is a better idea!!)

 

Column

 1

 

Grammar

Rule #

Column 2

 

Error

 

Column  3

 

Error

Type

Column

4

 

Points Lost

Column

5

 

Corrections/Explanations

Column

 6

 

Extra Column

SPELLING ERRORS

Salmon GRS

Rule 58

20.

sp

-1

frantically, frantically, frantically, frantically, frantically

 

Salmon  GRS

Rule 58

37.

circled

  sp

-2

then, then, then, then, then, then, then, then, then, then, then, then, then, then, then

 

Salmon  GRS

Rule 60

52.

sp

-1

devoted, devoted, devoted, devoted, devoted

 

EXACT WORD ERRORS

none

16.

ew

-1

As a result of the new backpack policy, student morale was low.

morale:  the mental and emotional condition of an individual with regard to a task at hand

moral:  an ethical code of conduct

MSF ERRORS

Salmon  GRS

Rule 84

2.

msf

-1

I should have written “twenty-first century” instead of using numerals because “all numbers that can be said in one or two words must be written out.”

seventy-five (not 75)

175 (not one hundred seventy-five)

 

Green Parenthetical Documentation Section, p. 7, Rule G

 and Yellow MSF, p. 6, “First Page of a Research Paper”

48, 50

msf

-2

I should have put the period at the end of the block quotation, not after the parenthetical documentation.

Let’s assume this is the 4th line of a block quotation:  We understand the awful impact.  (Holm 53)

Yellow Works Cited, section, p. 3, Rule 5

75.

msf

-1

I should have put “et al.” in place of the names of all five authors.

Meany, Owen, et. al.

MISPLACED MODIFIER ERRORS   

Salmon GRS

Rule 81

13.

mm

-1

Looking out of the cab of my truck, I saw a moose.

 

 

RUN-ON ERRORS   

Salmon  GRS

Rule 5

24

RO

-2

S     AV

He bought the tickets.  However,

S                   AV

he never attended the concert.

 

 

 

 

 

Column

 1

 

Grammar

Rule #

Column 2

 

Error

 

Column 3

 

Error Type

Column

4

 

Points Lost

Column

5

 

Corrections/Explanations

Column

6

 

Extra Column

AGREEMENT ERRORS  

Salmon  GRS

Rule 65

65.

agr

-1

He knows how to get into an athlete’s mind and make him or her perform at peak.

 

 

 

  

PUNCTUATION ERRORS              

Salmon  GRS

Rule 51

53.

pa

-1

The Vikings’ head coach was fired.

 

 

Salmon  GRS

Rule 31

 

73.

 

psc

 

-1

 

The crowd arrived at seven o’clock; however, the band was late.

 

 

 

 

 

COMMA ERRORS  

Salmon  GRS

Rule 13

CC

1.

pc

-1

The fog was the thickest it had been in years, and the chance of losing your way was almost guaranteed.

The matador waved his red cape in fury, but the bull sniffed a flower.

Salmon  GRS

Rule 13

CC

4.

pc

-1

But my watch showed that it was exactly midnight, and I was still driving around St. Paul trying to see through the blanket of fog that seemed to be smothering my car.

Andy went to ski in Montana for a week, and his daughter went to school.

Salmon GRS

Intro Phrase

Rule 15

7.

pc

-1

Through debating, I slowly would realize the amount of controversy surrounding the late queen.

Acting swiftly, the runner passed the leader of the race.

 

Salmon GRS

IDC

Rule 15

6.

pc

-1

Even though the fog seemed velveteen and innocent, it was forming shapes that seemed to take on frightening appearances.

As she lay crying, the sun rose.

 

Salmon  GRS

NONESS

Rule 22 and

Intro Phrase

Rule 15

10, 11

pc

-2

(-1 / -1)

For a brief moment, the crowd, which was comprised of our neighbors, actually acted as if they might incite a riot.

For a split second, the tiger, who was majestic in every aspect, was seen behind a large piece of bamboo.