revised last on 2/15/2011

 

                                                    

 

 

 

2nd hour!  I finally linked your poem! 

I am so sorry I didn't get a chance to read it (and cry!) for you in person.  I have a copy for each of you, so please stop by. 

Meanwhile, click HERE for a copy!  Enjoy (and don't cry!), and stay in touch.  Hope to see you at Hamlet in April!

 

ADV. 12 REUNION AND FIELD TRIP TO SEE  Hamlet at the Theatre in the Round-- Thursday, April 14, 2011

 Cost $20.00  due date February 10th.

Click HERE for the permission form.

 

 

 

Click HERE for PHOTO ARCHIVES of Wally's previous Adv. 12 classes!

WHAT'S GOING ON IN WALLY'S ADV. 12 CLASS TODAY?

2011 CALENDAR

CLICK ON THIS WEEK!

The calendar feature of this website is always in progress.  Check back often for updates.  I try to update the calendar daily; however, do not rely on this website solely to find out what we did in class and what was turned in.  Your main method of getting assignments and knowing what to turn in should be your own recording on our in-class homework calendar.

You can always e-mail me to check on homework: lwallenberg@edenpr.org but try your study buddy first!

 

For a copy of a blank HW calendar, click HERE.

For a current list of all the 2011 journals, click HERE.

Week 1 September 7-10 Week 11 November 15-19 FIELD TRIP--Park Square Theatre  A Midsummer Night's Dream & Immersion Day workshops
Week 2:    September 13-17 Week 12 November 22-26  THANKSGIVING BREAK
Week 3: September 20-24 Week 13 November 29-December 3 FIELD TRIP--Guthrie A CHRISTMAS CAROL (Dec. 2nd 8:00-4:30) 
Week 4September 27 - Oct. 1 HOMECOMING Week 14December 6-10
Week 5 October 4--October 8 CONFERENCES (Oct. 6th  4:30-8:30 and Oct. 7th 12:00-8:00) Week 15December 13-17  CONFERENCES (Dec. 15th and Dec. 17th 4:30-8:30)
Week 6:    October 11-15  Late Start 9th & 12th grades Oct. 13th Week 16 December 20-22   Winter Break Begins December 23
Week 7:  October 18-22 MEA BREAK Oct. 15-16  Week 17: 2011!  January 4-7
Week 8:    October 25-29   On-Site Admissions Oct. 28th Week 18  January 10-14
Week 9:   November 1-5 Week 19 January 17-21  MLK DAY No School Jan. 17
Week 10November 8-12  END of 1st TERM Week 20  January 25-29  FIELD TRIP--Guthrie Romeo & Juliet (Jan. 25th  8:00-4:30) No School Jan. 28   That's it, folks!  You did it!  Come back and visit! 

 

 

 

 

 Welcome to the ADV. 12 Lit. & Comp. Class of 2011!  

 

Greetings!  All student registered for Adv. English 12 as of September 1st were mailed a green "Welcome Letter."  Be sure to bring it to class on Tuesday, the first day of your awesome SENIOR YEAR!  If you didn't get one or would like to read the green welcome letter online or print out a copy, click HERE.

 

 Welcome to the ADV. 12 Lit. & Comp. Class of 2011!  

  CLICK BELOW for COPIES OF DOCUMENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT OUR CLASS

  1. The "GREEN" Welcome Letter to the Class of 2011! Click HERE.

  2. Summer Reading and Writing Assignment 

  3. SUMMER READING RUBRICS

  4. MAJOR WORKS DATA SHEETS (will need to be completed for each summer novel)

  5. Adv. 12 Comp & Lit SYLLABUS Click HERE & scroll down.

 

Eden Prairie High School 2010-11

Summer Reading Requirement

for Advanced English 12 - Academic Composition & Literature and Advanced 12 Humanities

  

The following assignment is required for all Advanced English 12 students. Buy your own copy of each book so that you may actively read them. Active reading will help you a great deal when it comes to reviewing the content in preparation for taking a test on these works and later in the course writing a paper based on the summer reading. On the next page, you will find advice on how to practice “active reading.”                             

THE SUMMER READING ASSIGNMENT

 

Read one book from each column below and complete the assignment described.

 

Shakespeare (You must purchase the Signet Classic edition. You may NOT use the No Fear Shakespeare by SparkNotes edition!)

 

Choose one from this column:

Novels (You may purchase any edition of the novel)

 

 

Choose one from this column:

Richard III  or

 

Henry V

Tale of Two Cities (Charles Dickens)  or

Hard Times (Charles Dickens)             or

Pride and Prejudice (Jane Austen)

 

 

For students in Advanced English 12 - Academic Composition & Literature ONLY:

    

Is it FATE?

      

HEAD VS HEART 

   

 

Be sure to read carefully through this home page! My website is meant to be informative, helpful, and a means for you to access some of the course documents online.

 

Like a little knowledge, a little literacy is a dangerous thing.  

As Shakespeare said in Henry V, "All things be ready if our minds be." 

Are you ready?  If so, read on.

 

Here's a bit about me:

 

 My name is Linda Wallenberg.  I have the pleasure of being your teacher this term--your teacher of a course that I absolutely love to teach! 

 

I have been at Eden Prairie High School since 1977 and I have loved learning along with my students since the very beginning.  Oddly, I am now even teaching students whose parents I taught at one time!  I am teaching this class because I have some strong feelings about the importance of literature and writing in our everyday lives.  Let me share a little of my course philosophy.

 

Literature we know, because we have read it and because we continue to read it, provides us with vicarious experiences.  There is not enough time on the clock, and there is not universe enough physically for any person to enter all the experiences and to meet all the people he or she must meet to be all he or she can be.  Some of them we need to get out of books.  Literature helps us to make contact with history with history made and in the making, to recognize that our emotions are old, still valid, that the questions that count are the unanswerable ones, the ones we have to live by.  I hope that in our journey together, you will be inspired to answer some of these questions for yourselves--as a result of studying the literature we will encounter this term. 

 

Now, for the personal side:

I grew up in Evanston, Illinois, and moved to Minnesota in 1971 to study English and Swedish at Gustavus Adolphus College.  I also studied folk culture at the University of Uppsala in Sweden.   Every summer I work at Sjölunden Swedish Language Village where I have taught Swedish for 27 years.

My surprise at having a path named after me at Swedish camp.  It's named "Linda's Path," or in Swedish "Lindas Stig"

 

I have a Master's in Education from the University of Minnesota.  In 2005 I was named one of 10 finalists for Minnesota Teacher of the Year and inducted into the University of Minnesota Gymnastics Hall of Fame.  What an amazing year!

 

I also coach gymnastics and was the head coach at EPHS for 17 years.  Now I coach mostly pre-school classes at TAGS Eden Prairie where Carina and Robby competed.  I also got to combine my love of books and gymnastics by authoring a gymnastics book called Play by Play Gymnastics.

 

Aside from my love of Swedish culture, gymnastics, and teaching, I also love hanging out with my kids-- Carina (age 18--a Rotary foreign exchange student in Sweden this year) and Robby (age 16--11th grade at EPHS), playing racquetball, watching movies, reading, skiing, summers, playing softball, and just hanging out as a family!  By the way, we also have two cats--Blackbelt and Midnight. 

 

My absolute favorite thing to do is traveling!  I am trying to visit all of the places which relate to the literature I teach and have brought my kids to most of those places, too.

                          

                                                                   Wally in front of Shakespeare's grave in Stratford                

 

         

                                            Windsor Castle                             Westminster Abbey                  Copenhagen, Denmark

 

I have the pleasure of being your teacher this term--your teacher of a course that I absolutely love to teach!  I have been at Eden Prairie High School since 1977 and I have loved learning along with my students since the very beginning.  Oddly, I am now even teaching students whose parents I taught at one time!  I am teaching this class because I have some strong feelings about the importance of literature, writing and clear communication, in both our everyday lives as well as in your future.   

Now that you know a little about me, I'm anxious to hear about you! 

 

    See you in class! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a list of this page's site contents (further down):

HOW TO CONTACT WALLY:

 You are welcome to contact me after school hours through the following:

     CONGRATULATIONS!

 

 

The following is a copy of the letter sent out this summer welcoming and explaining Advanced Eng. 12.  If you would like to print out a pdf copy of the letter, click HERE.

 

WALLY’S “FAMOUS” GREEN WELCOME LETTER

(rev. 2008-9)

 

CONGRATULATIONS!

Welcome to Advanced English 12 with Wally!  How’s that summer reading coming?

 

Let me first explain why you are getting this letter. It is because you are registered for next term in my senior English course, Advanced English 12—Academic Composition Emphasis.  I am writing this letter to prepare you for what you are about to encounter.  This class is designed to prepare you for the rigor of college work.  The reason I started this letter off with the word, "CONGRATULATIONS," is because you have elected to take this course--one of the most challenging the Eden Prairie High School English department offers.  You know, of course, that this is the beginning of the end of your “free” education.  Yet, the senior year has also been erroneously thought of as a "time to slide” because once accepted into college, you can now supposedly “slack” and do the bare minimum because "grades don't count any more.”  These comments have nothing to do with this course.  Getting accepted into college is one matter; actually being ready to handle the rigor of college work is something entirely different!  Scores of former Adv. English 12 often come back to visit.  Once they have transitioned to college life and the rigor of college work, they often relate the value and the relevance of what this class meant to them and how well it taught them what they needed to know so they were ready for college and the demands and expectations of college professors.  In several short months, college will begin for you, too.  And, regardless of your final EPHS GPA or credits, you must be ready!!!!  For this reason, I gather, you elected this course.  So, I say, "CONGRATULATIONS."

 

So, I write this letter to let you know that, obviously, this is a rigorous course.  You must be prepared to work hard and must plan for the time necessary outside of class to do well.  Learning to write college level papers is probably the most important work we do in this course as it is the major instrument college professors use in evaluation. Writing good papers takes time--prewriting, revision, and, later, after the paper is returned, more revision will be expected so that you can learn from your own individual errors.  I believe that the more you practice (the more papers you write), the more confident and able you will become.  You will write at least five papers (averaging 3-5 pages each) during the course.  This means that most weekends you will either be working on or revising a paper--as well as doing any other daily homework assigned during the weekend.  You can expect to do (depending on your reading ability and speed) probably do from one to two hours of homework each night--aside from the time that must be allotted for preparation of the papers.  There is absolutely no in-class time to work on homework.  I want you to walk in the door next term ready to give your academics (and specifically this course) all you've got—so you can "go out with all your flags flying" (more about that concept later in the course).

 

Like a little knowledge, a little literacy is a dangerous thing.  

 

As Shakespeare said in Henry V, "All things be ready if our minds be."  Are you ready?  If so, read on.

 

* * * Wally’s Course Philosophy  * * * *

Literature we know, because we have read it and because we continue to read it, provides us with vicarious experiences.  There is not enough time on the clock, and there is not universe enough physically for any person to enter all the experiences and to meet all the people he or she must meet to be all he or she can be.  Some of them we need to get out of books.  Literature helps us to make contact with history (with history made and in the making), to recognize that our emotions are old, still valid, that the questions that count are the unanswerable ones, the ones we live by.

 

What this course will try to do is provide you with some of these experiences by having you read and respond to a selection of works representing the Medieval and Renaissance Periods of English literature.  Given the number of works that there are and the time in which we have to read them, we will not be able to read all that there is to read (perhaps not even everything listed on your course syllabus), but we will make something of a beginning.  The more you can read (above and beyond the "required" reading), the more you will come away with.

 

Like all art, literature gives pleasure.  It has a certain magic that transports us from the "real" world to a seemingly more remote and enjoyable place.  You can experience this quality without analyzing it.  However, literature also poses intellectual challenges that do demand analysis.  For most readers, grappling with these challenges enhances the pleasure of literature.  By studying literature, you "see" more of it to appreciate.  And you learn that, far from being remote from life, good literature pleases you by reflecting and giving order to life.  It is the pleasure derived from reflection that much of this course will aim for; in short, this course, like so many other courses, is a course in reading, thinking, writing, and discussing.

 

This course, then, will try to teach all of these--or at least give you the opportunity to add to what you have already been taught about them.  Since the basis of this course are selected literary texts, there is no better way to learn from these texts than by reading, thinking, writing, and then sharing with others about them.

  

 

* * *  About the Summer Reading and One Last Word* * * *

Eden Prairie High School 2009-2010

Summer Reading Requirement

for Advanced English 12 - Academic Composition & Literature and Advanced 12 Humanities

  

The following assignment is required for all Advanced English 12 students. Buy your own copy of each book so that you may actively read them. Active reading will help you a great deal when it comes to reviewing the content in preparation for taking a test on these works and later in the course writing a paper based on the summer reading. On the next page, you will find advice on how to practice “active reading.”                             

THE SUMMER READING ASSIGNMENT

 

Read one book from each column below and complete the assignment described.

 

Shakespeare (You must purchase the Signet Classic edition. You may NOT use the No Fear Shakespeare by SparkNotes edition!)

 

Choose one from this column:

Novels (You may purchase any edition of the novel)

 

 

Choose one from this column:

Richard III  or

 

Henry V

Tale of Two Cities (Charles Dickens)  or

Hard Times (Charles Dickens)             or

Pride and Prejudice (Jane Austen)

 

 

For students in Advanced English 12 - Academic Composition & Literature ONLY:

If you have any questions about this assignment, please contact your assigned English teacher through the English department (975-8190).

  

What is “Active Reading”?

 

Ø       To develop and record ideas and opinions about a reading that can be used in class discussion

Ø       To make it easier to organize information logically and to find it quickly when needed;

Ø       To increase comprehension, vocabulary, analytical and evaluation skills, links with what a reader already knows, long term memory;

Ø       To help the reader inductively discover the meaning of a work and to have stated it in his own words;

Ø       To have a “conversation” with the author

 

HERE’S HOW (IN GENERAL)

 

Generally, for Active Reading of passages, highlight, box, star, code, translate, paraphrase, summarize over or beside lines, sentences, and passages. On pages, write notes in margins, on bottoms, tops, or in corners and/or add post it notes to accommodate reader’s notes. On end flaps, create titled lists and categories of information and collect information under these categories with quoted, key words from passages and the page # next to the quoted word (fuller notes will be on the entire quote in the reading).

Ø       Highlight sparingly – coloring the entire reading does not help important information to stand out;

 

HERE’S HOW (IN MORE DETAIL)

o        Analyze, evaluate, speculate about the title before beginning to read and then come back to the title after reading and summarize its relevance – always write a sentence or so explaining its relevance to the theme or thesis of the story/article;

o        Examine chapter or section titles or headings before, during, and after reading;

o        Identify and comment on the narration – 1st or 3rd person, why? Omniscient, dramatic, participating – why? Present tense? Past tense? Why? Formal or informal? Educated or not – why? Keep a section in the front of the book to add to a growing understanding of the narration, point of view, tone, and mood of the piece. Decide and write the author’s purpose for this narrative choice.

o        Analyze the narrator as a character, even in nonfiction works – decide and comment on why he is reliable and unreliable.

o        Highlight or underline important ideas;

o        Write parallel lines to the side of passages too long to highlight but which need emphasis;

o        Star ideas of utmost importance;

o        Circle and define unfamiliar vocabulary words or ones with archaic or unusual meanings;

o        Cycle, box, or color-code with a highlighter groups or series of words that work together to develop an image, motif, theme, character, main idea, or some other element;

o        Place post it notes as markers at the edge of the page with a note as to the significance of that page;

o        Write analytical notes, paraphrases, ideas in the margins that will help the reader remember thoughts about the content of the page;

o        Write key words that identify a symbol, image, or other important idea in the

upper outside corner of pages so that when the reader flips through the book, he easily sees what significant idea, etc, is on the page and which has been thoroughly noted in the text of the page;

o        Cross reference images, motifs, recurring important ideas, etc. Start a list on an end flap that gives a title to the group, e.g., “Christian Imagery” pp. 6, 9, 15, 80, 210, etc. On each page highlight and comment on the example itself;

o        Comment in the margins – react personally, agree, disagree, compare or contrast to previous knowledge/ another book / ideas;

o        Write questions about what is not understood;

o        Predict what might happen, and Speculate about what could have happened– “What if the character had done…?” “What if the writer had been [different in some way]?”

 

 

 For more information on Active Reading, you may want to read Mortimer J. Adler’s essay “How To Mark A Book.” From The Saturday Review of Literature, July 6, 1940, pp. 11-12 Copyright 1940, The Sat. Review Co., Inc.; renewed 1967 Sat. Review, Inc.

 

 

 

 

Advanced English 12 - Academic Composition & Literature

SUMMER READING RUBRIC

NOTE:  Bring this to class along with your actively-read summer books. 

Self-score each area & comment below!

Name _______________________________________  Due date:  ______________________

NOVEL: ______________________

total

SHAKESPEARE PLAY: __________________________

total

In-text margin notes and marking:  As you read, keep a record of the following—storyline, key events, characters, changes in character, key quotations, new/important vocabulary, symbols, imagery.  Do this by highlighting, color coding, underlining, writing notes in margins, on bottoms, tops, or in corners of pages, and/or adding post it notes to accommodate your notes. etc.

(+5)

 

 

 

 

Student self score:

 

_____/5

 

 

 

teacher score:

 

_____/5

In-text margin notes and marking:  As you read, keep a record of the following—storyline, key events, characters, changes in character, key quotations, new/important vocabulary, symbols, imagery.  Do this by highlighting, color coding, underlining, writing notes in margins, on bottoms, tops, or in corners of pages, and/or adding post it notes to accommodate your notes. etc.

(+5)

 

 

 

 

Student self score:

 

_____/5

 

 

 

teacher score:

 

_____/5

On end flaps or on separate sheets of paper:  create titled lists of character names, symbols, significant quotations, motifs, themes, and vocabulary.  Be sure to include page numbers on your lists(+5)

Student self score:

 

_____/5

 

 

 

teacher score:

 

_____/5

On end flaps or on separate sheets of paper:  create titled lists of character names, symbols, significant quotations, motifs, themes, and vocabulary.  Be sure to include page numbers on your lists(+5)

Student self score:

 

_____/5

 

 

 

teacher score:

 

_____/5

In-text personal commentary: 

As you read, keep a record of the following—agree, disagree, compare or contrast to previous knowledge/ another book / ideas; write questions about what is not understood, predictions of what might happen “What if the character had done…?”   (+5)

Student self score:

 

_____/5

 

 

teacher score:

 

_____/5

In-text personal commentary: 

As you read, keep a record of the following—agree, disagree, compare or contrast to previous knowledge/ another book / ideas; write questions about what is not understood, predictions of what might happen “What if the character had done…?”   (+5)

Student self score:

 

_____/5

 

 

teacher score:

 

_____/5

Parent/student signature verification (-1 if none)

 

Parent/student signature verification   (-1 if none)

 

Student comments:

____/15

Student comments:

 

_____/15

 

 

I hope that this letter serves to clarify what will be expected of you in this advanced course.  Students who have previously been in this course have suggested that I write this letter to let you know in advance what it entails.  Attached are your course syllabus and other pertinent information you need to be ready for our first day of class.  Grab a highlighter and read through the attached syllabus carefully.  Be prepared with questions the first day as well as a 3-ring binder with index dividers pre-labeled, etc.  Be sure to list a few questions you might have at the end of the syllabus in the space provided.  In closing, I want you to know that this is a course that I love to teach and where I grow each time I work with students excited about growing personally as well as academically.  I can guarantee you will come away from the class ready to take on the challenge of college. 

Finally, welcome!  Let's begin!                          Linda Wallenberg (Wally)

 

______________________________________________________________________________

(rev. 2010)                                   

Instructor:  Linda Wallenberg 

            voice mail:  952 975-4303

            e-mail:  Lwallenberg@edenpr.k12.mn.us

 

  Advanced English 12: SYLLABUS

 

I. Course Content:         

The following is a BANK of material from which course content will be chosen .

               1.  Course Introduction and Philosophy and Building a Class Foundation

                              "Cultural Literacy Tidbit" research paper

               2.  Review of Writing Conventions

                    a.  MLA style

                    b.  Commas

                    c.  Styles of rhetoric

               3. Poetry terminology and British poems of the twentieth century

                            •Selections of Yeats, Eliot, Graves, Auden, Thomas, Smith, Larkin,

                                  Hughes, Heaney, Boland

                        •Literary Analysis paper

               4.  Literary Theories

                            •Evaluation paper:  Literary Theories paper

               5.  Anglo-Saxon and Medieval (450 AD-1485) periods

                     a.  Historical Background

                     b.  History of the English Language

                     c.  Beowulf and selections from Gardner’s Grendel

                     d.  Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales

                              •Narrative paper:  "Twenty-first Century Prologue"

                     e.  Gawain and the Green Knight

 

               6.  English Renaissance (1485-1625) period

                     a.  Historical Background

                     b.  Shakespeare’s Hamlet

                     c.  Perhaps another Shakespeare play (time permitting)

               7.  Poetry Classics

                     a.   The Seventeenth Century (1625-1660)

                           •  Selections of Donne, Jonson, Herrick, Lovelace, Milton

                     b.   The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century (1660-1798)

                           •  Selections of Swift, Pope, Johnson, Gray, Burns, Blake

                     c.   The Romantic Age (1798-1832)

                           •  Selections of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats

                     d.   The Victorian Age (1833-1900)

                           •Selections of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Hardy, Hopkins, Housman

               8.  Mary Shelley's Frankenstein 

                           Position paper

               9. Another novel or play (time permitting)

             10.  Course Final--"Meeting of the Minds"

                         

 

II. Course (not summer reading) Texts 

               •  Literature:  The British Tradition (LBT) (published by Prentice-Hall)

   

•  English Writing and Skills (Complete Course)--resource book for grammar, etc.

               •  Beowulf (translated by Seamus Heaney)—available for purchase in our school store

               •  Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (translated by R.M. Lumiansky)

               •  The Norton Anthology of English Literature (5th/6th ed. edited by M.H. Abrams)

               •  Hamlet  (Signet Classic edition) —available for purchase in our school store

               •  Frankenstein by Mary Shelley—available for purchase in our school store

               • Grendel by John Gardner

               • Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead by Tom Stoppard

               • Summer reading:  a novel and Shakespeare play

 

NOTE:  In addition, I would highly recommend you purchase Joseph Gibaldi’s MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, sixth edition.  It is the premiere handbook colleges use for MLA style when writing papers!

 

 COURSE POLICIES

III. Grading

      

               A.     Daily work, quizzes, tests, and journals are worth 40%.

               B.      Papers/major projects are worth 60%. Papers are 70 points.  Evaluation is based on

                        content (40 points), style (10 points), and writing conventions (20 points).

               C      Grade updates are given approximately every two weeks.

 

               D.     GRADING SCALEA   = 93 - 100          C+    =  77  -  79

                                                            A-  = 90 -  92          C      =  73  -  76

                                                                                            C-     =  70  -  71

                                                            B+ = 87 -  89          

                                                            B   = 83 -  86           D+    =  67  -  69

                                                            B-  = 80 -  82           D      =  63  -  66

                                                                                             D-    = 60  -  62

 

 

                E.  NOTE:  This is a semester course.  The final grade for this 2 credit course comes at the very end of the course.

 

 

   IV. Course Expectations

               A.     The Eden Prairie High School Registration Guide says this about Advanced English 12—Academic Composition Emphasis:

                        This is a course designed for the college-bound 12th grade student who will benefit from an advanced course in literature and composition.  Students will read extensively in major works drawn from British literature.  Composition assignments may include literary analysis, narrative, persuasive essays, research papers, creative papers, and critiques.  Students will continue to develop clarity, organization, style, and sentence structure.

 

               B.      Designed like a college course, this class is discussion-oriented; participation is an expectation! 

 

               C.     NOTE:  Do not expect any in-class reading, in-class research, or in-class work on homework time.

 

    V. Absences

               A.     Attendance must be consistent.  If you miss class, it's your responsibility to call your "study partner."  Exchange phone numbers and e-mail addresses.  Your study partner is expected to fill out a green Study Partner Absence Sheet and staple the day's handouts to it so you have all your missing work waiting for you when you return.

 

               B.     Make-up policy

                        1.     Papers, major projects, the JOURNAL collection must be turned in on time even if you are absent from class the day a major assignment is due.  If you are in school but miss our class (for example:  field trip), you must still turn in your major assignments.  You must arrange to have someone else turn the major assignment in for you or it will be counted late.  Late major assignments will be deducted 10% of the total point value for each day the paper is late.  WEEKENDS count as 2 days late.  Each individual day of a school vacation counts as a day late.  This major work is due by 3:00 on the due date.  You may not e-mail papers to me. 

2.      Daily work is worth 50% if turned in late on the day the assignment is due or on the following day.  The day after that, it is worth zero.  If you are in school but miss our class (example:  field trip) on the day an assignment is due, the assignment must be turned in directly to the teacher that day or else you will be assessed a late grade. 

3.      If you miss a quiz or exam due to absence, you will arrange a time agreed upon by the teacher for making up this quiz or exam.  Late deductions will apply to quizzes and exams which are not made up in the English Resource Center on the date prearranged by the teacher and student.

4.      Buybacks (if allowed) are technical corrections on papers.  They are due by 3:00 on the due date (located on your paper grading sheet) designated by the teacher.  They will only be given 50% of the buyback credit if turned in one day late.  They will not be accepted for any credit any longer than one day late.

      

   VI. Materials

      

               PERSONAL MATERIALS:

               A.     Highlighter (for active reading/marking handouts, books, notes) and red pen for editing.

               B.      File folder to log papers/essay progress

               C.     Your own copy of the Signet Classic edition of Hamlet   (available at our school store)

               D.     Three-ring binder with dividers and loose-leaf paper for journals (not a spiral-bound notebook)

Have your 15 dividers labeled this way for the first day of class:

 

A WHAT'S UP? (misc. stuff) F COURSE INTRO K GAWAIN & THE GREEN KNIGHT
B

SURVIVAL PAC. & WRITING CONVENTIONS

G POETRY L CHAUCER
C JOURNALS (and applicable hand-outs) H LITERARY THEORY M FRANKENSTEIN
D VOCABULARY I HISTORICAL BACKGROUND N HAMLET
E PAPERS (hand-outs, drafts, etc.) J BEOWULF & GRENDEL O MISCELLANEOUS

  

VII. Papers (both research and analytical essays)       

              

               These will make up the major portion of your grade.  It is required that they are typed.  Each paper    assignment will be explained in a separate purple hand-out with a grading sheet.

 

               A.     FORMAT   You will receive many helpful handouts to follow proper manuscript form (msf).

                        The handouts are based on Modern Language Association (MLA) format.

 

               B.      IT IS REQUIRED THAT YOU TURN IN A CORRECTLY FORMATTED OUTLINE AND/OR WORKS CITED PAGE (BIBLIOGRAPHY) FOR ALMOST EVERY PAPER.

 

               C.     LATE PAPERS

                        As stated above in more detail, late papers will lose 10% of the total points the paper is worth for each day late.  Generally, late papers will receive little, if any, comment. 

 

               D.     STYLE

                        Aside from content and mechanics, you will be evaluated on “style” for every paper.  Most of the papers will be formal in nature.  The use of "I" and "we" and "you" (and their various forms) are not permitted unless specified otherwise.  In addition, colloquialisms and clichés will not be permitted.  This course will prepare you for the highest level of academic writing expected in college course.  It is expected that the essays will have solid introductions which introduce the topic in an interesting manner and include a clear thesis/controlling purpose.  A conclusion must bring the essay to closure (providing a summary of your discussion).  The language choices and Sophistication of  language, elevated use of vocabulary, and diction are expected to be at or near a "college level."  Most of the analytical essays will follow the FIVE-PARAGRAPH ESSAY STRUCTURE.

                       

               E.      PARENTHETICAL DOCUMENTATION

                        You will always need to support your discussion with concrete examples/quotes from the text or other sources used to write your paper.  You will be expected to use parenthetical documentation to do this.  You will be loaned a style manual, called the “SURVIVAL PACKET” (based on MLA manuscript form) for the rules. 

 

            F.         PLAGIARISM

                         Plagiarism will be penalized severely; paraphrased material must be cited!  You are required to print out all copies of the sources you use which are listed on your works cited page.  There will be a very specific format for this.  In addition, you are required to turn in a complete second copy of your paper, called the “SECURITY COPY,” for the teacher’s reference and to be kept on file at EPHS indefinitely.

 

VIII. THE JOURNAL  

 

               A.     There are THREE different types of journal entries:

                        WA     =    assigned prompt/topic from me (1-2 assigned daily)

                        CC =   topic determined by you--but must be class-connected; assigned either every other week or as determined by teacher.

                        PR      =    a typed peer-letter to which a peer will respond; assigned every other week or as determined by teacher.

               B.      LENGTH OF JOURNALS:  Each entry must be minimum of one side of a page unless determined otherwise by teacher.  This means single-spaced from 1" left margin to 1" right margin and every line filled--done in your own  handwriting. You may, of course, type your journals.  Please double-space them!

 

               C.     About JOURNAL DUE DATES:

                        It is expected that each journal entry is done the day teacher says it's due.  I may or may not collect it that day.  Be prepared to turn it in, however.  The purpose of the journal is to have you do some pre-thinking on the literature or topics of the day's discussion.  Often times, we will begin class with partner, trio, small group or large group sharing of journals.  The less productive discussion is, the more frequently journals will be collected.  It makes no sense to do journals on topic for today's discussion two weeks from now.  Keep up on the daily work!

 

D.     HOW ARE JOURNALS GRADED?  If I collect a journal on the day it's due, it's worth 5 points per full page.  You can receive 1/2 credit the next day.  After than, no points are given.  It is important, however, to do the journal for the re-collection of the entire journal later in the term.

 

E.      SOME FINAL WORDS ON THE JOURNALS

I hope you will have fun with your journal--that you see it as a way of learning something about yourself.  Try different kinds of entries.  Be sensible sometimes, but sometimes crazy.  Invent your own ways of responding to the stories, plays, poems.  Do some additional reading about the authors or works if you wish.  Respond to class discussions (small or large group) as part of your journal.  Allow your intellect and imagination to go to work.  Remember:  our purpose is to enjoy, to feel, and to think more deeply as a result of our encounters with the literature.

 

IX. NOW IT’S YOUR TURN TO RESPOND TO ALL OF THIS!

After reading this "welcome letter" and reading the syllabus/course overview, jot down any questions/comments you have now (which you might want to bring up in class):

1. _____________________________________________________________

 

2. _____________________________________________________________

 

 

A FINAL REMINDER:

Bring this letter and syllabus with you the first day of class!

Don’t forget to have your binder all set up and to bring a file folder with you.

 

 

ONE LAST THING--ABOUT OUR CLASS WEBSITE!!!

Check out our very cool (and very busy!) Advanced 12 Lit. and Comp. website!

Here’s the URL:  http://teachers.edenpr.org/~lwallenberg/ADV12masterfolder/index.htm

The website has a wealth of materials and links to help you with class.

Here are some of the features:

a.WALLY’S “BIO”

b.HOW TO ACCESS CALENDAR/YOUR ASSIGNMENTS (be sure to look at the link!)  The calendar feature of this website is continuously in progress.  My goal is to post each day's class activities, what homework/assignments are collected that day, and what homework is given for that evening.  Remember that this isn't a perfect system.  Always go with what you wrote down in class if there is a discrepancy. You can always e-mail me to check on homework: lwallenberg@edenpr.org

c.  HOW TO CONTACT WALLY

d. HOW TO ACCESS CALENDAR/YOUR ASSIGNMENTS

e. COURSE TEXTS

f.    ADVANCED ENG. 12 COURSE SYLLABUS

g.  WALLY’S “FAMOUS” GREEN WELCOME LETTER (a copy of this letter)

h.  COURSE POLICIES

i.    SURVIVAL PACKET DOCUMENTS

j.    OTHER HELPFUL LINKS

k.   PHOTO GALLERY

l.    100 MOST RECOMMENDED WORKS FOR YOU TO READ!!

m.    EPHS TEACHERS' ALL-TIME "MUST READ" BOOKS AND "MUST SEE" MOVIES

n.   SHAKESPEARE RESEARCH TOPICS WEBSITES

EPHS ENGLISH DEP'T SURVIVAL MANUAL DOCUMENTS:

For $5.00 you can purchase or you will be loaned a style manual, called the SURVIVAL PACKET (based on the 7th edition of the MLA Handbook of manuscript form). 

 Many of the documents included in this SURVIVAL PACKET (SP) are available from the 

our -ENGLISH DEPARTMENT HOMEPAGE WITH ALL DOCUMENTS NAVIGATIONAL.  Y

ou can then print these documents out at home.

CHECK THIS OUT AT:

 http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/english/index.html

For copies of sections from the new

EPHS ENGLISH DEPARTMENT SURVIVAL MANUAL (rev. 11.23.09),

Click HERE for the entire manual full size

or HERE for the entire manual half size.

click HERE for the COVER with table of contents  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the GRS (Grammar Rules Summary) section--yellow

click HERE for the MSF (Manuscript Formatting Rules) section--yellow

click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) SHORT FORM--pink

Buybacks (rev. 2010)!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

 If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.

 (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

 

SOME OTHER HELPFUL SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS:

  1. ELEMENTS OF SCREEN WRITING (originally goldenrod) CLICK HERE.

  2. Parts of Speech Review and COMMA REFRESHER PACKET (originally gray) CLICK HERE.

 

OTHER CLASSROOM MATERIALS

BLUE POETRY PACKET, click HERE!

POETRY TERMS LIST,

POETRY TONE AND MOOD WORDS,

POETRY RESPONSE SHEETS,

LITERARY THEORY PACKET,

BEOWULF PACKET,

CHAUCER PACKET, GAWAIN PACKET,

gray Frankenstein HW packet, click HERE!

 FRANKENSTEIN PACKET PART 1,

FRANKENSTEIN PACKET PART 2,

F.I.G. QUESTION PACKET 

HAMLET INTRO PACKET Click HERE to get a pdf. copy of the entire Hamlet Intro Packet.

 

 

PAPER PACKETS!!!

If you have misplaced or need to reference a paper packet, click on the link below for each paper:      

  1. CLT paper packet, click HERE. For a copy of just the grading sheet for the CLT paper, click HERE.

  2. Lit. Theory Paper  

  3. Beowulf Lit. Analysis Paper                                  

  4. dCT Narrative Paper with Buybacks OR  CT Narrative Paper without Buybacks

  5. Position Paper

 

OTHER HELPFUL LINKS:

 As I develop this website, I will begin to put helpful links that would be available for our class.

Here are a few:

  1. Vocabulary building:  http://www.wordsmith.org (once you "sign up," you will receive an e-mail daily with a "word of the day" and other fun!) OTHER GREAT WORD resources: http://www.wordsmith.org or http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/ (for vocabulary building; once you "sign up," you will receive an e-mail daily with a "word of the day" and other fun!) and http://thesaurus.reference.com/   and http://thesaurus.reference.com/features/thesaurusalphabet2005  and Wally's favorite online thesaurus: http://www.visualthesaurus.com/landing/  and for etymology work:   http://www.etymonline.com/ and for idioms: http://www.tjtaylor.net/tools-idioms-phrasal-verbs.htm

  2. COLORS!!!  https://www.advisorteam.com/temperament_sorter/register.asp (the Kiersey TEMPERAMENT SORTER which you can do online to find out what "color" (orange, gold, blue, green) you are when we do work with color groups

  3. Taylor Hartman's COLOR Code website & test http://www.thecolorcode.com/

  4. Daily Celebrations of COLORS http://www.dailycelebrations.com/092499.htm

  5. Try the "colorgenics" test! It's cool:  http://www.paulgoldinresearch.com/cg/index.htm

  6. Fun "tests" to see which characters you are most like in the works of literature we read-- http://www.selectsmart.com

  7. POETRY TERMS!  http://www.poeticbyway.com/glossary2.html  or http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88/poetic-terms.html or  http://www.k-state.edu/english/baker/english320/cc.htm  or http://ethnicity.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Terms/  or http://www.northern.edu/hastingw/terms.htm   or  http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_I.html

  8. Wally's fun poetry site link!  CLICK HERE!

  9. Where to find cool quotes?   For ideas for quotes/sayings, try these websites:  http://www.quotegarden.com  OR http://www.quoteworld.org/browse.php  OR http://quoteland.com/ 

  10. A WEBSITE TO BUY THE CLASSICS CHEAP:  http://store.doverpublications.com/

  11. ONLINE THESAURUS SITES: http://thesaurus.reference.com/   and http://thesaurus.reference.com/features/thesaurusalphabet2005  and Wally's favorite http://www.visualthesaurus.com/landing/

  12. For an extra copy of the blank yellow HW calendar, click HERE.
  13. For a copy of the 2007 LIST OF JOURNALS, click HERE.
  14. For some fun youtube Shakespeare video links, click HERE.
  15. FREE download for MANY, not all, famous works of literature. These are not professional readers, but they are still quite usable.

    http://librivox.org/newcatalog/

     

  16. Need to/Want to find a GREAT BOOK to read (or movie)?  Try the English Department homepage for EPHS staff favorite pics!   http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/english/favorite_books_movies.pdf  Here's another idea:  http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/english/novels_short_stories.pdf 

    See the Radcliffe list of the 100 best Eng. Language Novels of the 20th century!  http://www.cnn.com/books/news/9807/22/radcliffe.list/list.html

    Another place to find a GREAT BOOK:  See the YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association) recommended book lists for an idea for an outside reading book that TEENS recommend: http://www.ala.org/ala/yalsa/booklistsawards/booklistsbook.htm

 

 

 

 

 

THE CLASS of 2007!

 

 

 

If you have any questions about this assignment, please contact Wally (952 975-4303  or Lwallenberg@edenpr.org