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  Week 13:  Nov. 30-Dec. 3, 2010

GUTHRIE THEATRE FIELD TRIP THIS THURSDAY, Dec. 2nd!
A Christmas Carol
 

Schedule:

8:15 Leave EPHS--meet in Activity Center
9:30 Tour of the Guthrie
11:00 Lunch
1:00-approx. 3:15 Play
3:30 leave for home
 

 

Gardner's Grendel

and

 HELLO, MR. CHAUCER!!!!

on to Chaucer and his Canterbury Tales!

 

Chaucer: "The Knight's Tale," "The Miller's Tale," "The Reeve's Tale," "The Wife of Bath's Tale," "Nun's Priest's Tale," "The Pardoner's Tale," "The Physician's Tale," and Partner Poems

Click HERE if you need a copy of the yellow CHAUCER PACKET.

Beowulf paper (due Wednesday, Dec. 1 ) If you want to create your own topic, a proposed thesis and preliminary outline is required by ASAP! Click HERE for a copy of the new 2011 Beowulf paper packet Click HERE for the credentials for the editor/writers of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, vol. 1.  BEOWULF PAPER--the ORDER:  1. outline  2. paper itself  3.  works cited   4.  any supplementary articles/texts (pre-highlighted) which Wally didn't supply  5.  any supplementary articles/texts (no need to pre-highlight) which Wally supplied  6.  security copy (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight on day the paper is due!) Click HERE for the credentials of Donaldson and David who authored the chapter about the heroic ideal from "The Middle Ages" in the Norton Anthology of English Literature (It's the blue chapter copied in your Beowulf packet).

BEOWULF PAPER DUE FRIDAY, Dec. 5th

ORDER:

1. outline

2. paper itself

3.  works cited

4.  any articles/texts (pre-highlighted)

5.  security copy  (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight

Click HERE if you need a copy of the buff-colored BEOWULF 2010 packet Click HERE  if you need any hand-outs from the packet (NOTE:  it has the old cover assignment sheet on the top.  Just scroll past those pages to get to the hand-outs you need.)

 

EPHS ENGLISH DEPARTMENT SURVIVAL MANUAL  (rev. 11.22.09)

Click HERE for the entire manual full size

or  HERE for the entire manual half size.

click HERE for the COVER with table of contents  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the GRS (Grammar Rules Summary) section--yellow

click HERE for the MSF (Manuscript Formatting Rules) section--yellow

click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) SHORT FORM--pink

CLICK HERE for the BUYBACK PACKET (rev. 2008) 

  For a sample template, click HERE--> SAMPLE TEMPLATE FOR BUYBACKS (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  CLICK HERE FOR THE ACE simplified version without the categories of errors.

Buybacks (rev. 2010)!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

 If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.

 (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

 

DATE In-Class plan Homework (due next day almost always):

Monday, NOV. 29 

DAY 52

BEOWULF FINALE:  BE vs. DO!

 

BE!  Don't just "DO" this term!    

and

Gardner's Grendel

Today's Quote of the Day:

"We are no longer human beings.  We should be called human doings"  

~Richard Carlson in his book Don't Sweat the Small Stuff

And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count.  It's the life in your years.  ~Abraham Lincoln

Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking. -John Maynard Keynes, economist (1883-1946)

 

Today's allusion:

let the cat out of the bag

Today's Words of the Day:

defile

inordinate

bemused

incredulous

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group Check-in:
  • Thanksgiving break?
  • Progress on paper?
  • LIT TABLE TOPICS: Pick a question for your group and another group that would have applicability to Beowulf and/or Grendel
  •   Exchange with on another classmate's Gardner's Grendel journal. Tonight,  provide "meaty feedback"!  This is worth 3 more points on the journal!
  • Check out CT books
  • Turn in Grendel books
  • NEW GROUPS--CT/monster groups!
  • Play Alex Doud's Beowulf rap and Gilmore Girls season 6 episode 10. min.)
  • Reactions to Gardner
  1. Intro to Canterbury Tales and tonight's assignment--explain how to do the WA Chaucerian Shadowing activity and debrief--physiognomy and the humors--ASSIGNMENT C2: WA  24 "Chaucerian Shadowing" (2 sider--front side observation notes and predictions/back side about physiognomy/humors and YOU!)  Follow the linked hand-out on how to do this (click HERE)   If you were absent today and missed our explaining the shadowing experience, follow the instructions outlined HERE.  Click HERE for a copy of the Chaucer Packet (the front cover has the Chaucerian Shadowing assignment explained).
  2. Gardner's Grendel----group agenda and philosophies.  divide into 4 groups according to your WA 23 choices. Compare the characters, endings, etc.  Read excerpts from Gardner's letter to Susan Lewis & students, etc. Astrological Wheel

    Who or what is Grendel--really?  Meet Grendel p. 26 Raffel and p. 9 in the Heany--Listen on tape 

    Cain & Abel story If not before, watch Cain and Abel video (22 min.)GRENDEL: Who or what is Grendel--really?  Meet Grendel p. 26 Raffel and p. 9 in the Heany--Listen on tape    Cain & Abel story If not before, watch Cain and Abel video (22 min.) 

  3. Gardner's Grendel  "The Nature of Grendel" as a pagan and Christian monster , story of Cain and Abel?, Gardner's Grendel:  What did you think of Gardner's Grendel? What might Grendel be symbolic of?  C/C WA  Gardner's Grendel--reaction and the 5 Q's, Gardner's Grendel, share what it was like if you started to read it
  4.  Maybe show Collins' "The Lanyard" or "Seventh-Grade Viking Warrior"  Taylor Mali
  5. HERO??? Did Beowulf do it?  Was his life meaningful? Who are the true Grendels?  the ending  Beowulf's journey to lead a good life--Hrothgar's advice, etc.  What are today's notions of HEROES?--SHARE CHARTS!!!  
  6. BE!  Don't just "DO" this term!    Review Hero column and round-robin sharing--Do "when you were little? question" and add to WA 1 Reflections, Bill Doherty "Help for Hurried families" notes, Brian willette, Schultz obituary, Todd Bachmann funeral program, Starfish story, chicken soup teacher story, color differences, hero test, "Millionaire Mind" article, Heroes Quiz , 6 degrees, "The Journey" Wixon jewely ads.  After AS heroes discuss modern ideas and share from your WA on heroes--incl male/female differences. Starfish story, Jordan's email, Show 3 min. clip from movie ACROSS THE UNIVERSE--25 min. into it--dinner table scene

  7. BEOWULF FUN THINGS: Memory Dean song--"Beowulf, Captain Hook, & the Albatross"  Shrinklets Beowulf and Beowulf cartoons Woody Allen quote & other Beowulf cartoons, Wixon Jewelry ads  CLICK HERE FOR COPIES    Beowulf cartoon movie:  http://www.newgrounds.com/portal/view/468319  Play Alex Doud's Beowulf rap and Gilmore Girls season 6 episode 10.

  8. LIT TABLE TOPICS: Pick a question for your group and another group that would have applicability to Beowulf and/or Grendel
  9. Gardner's Grendel----group agenda and philosophies.  divide into 4 groups according to your WA 23 choices. Compare the characters, endings, etc.  Read excerpts from Gardner's letter to Susan Lewis & students, etc. Astrological Wheel
  10. Reactions to Gardner

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. Grendel HW

  2. PR #3

  3. Beowulf paper outlines

 

  1. REMINDER!  We have the GUTHRIE THEATRE A Christmas Carol FIELD TRIP THIS THURSDAY, Dec. 2nd!  Tell your teachers!
    Click HERE if you need the forms to drive yourself.  Click HERE if you need a parent to pick you up early.
  2. Assignment   C2: WA  24 "Chaucerian Shadowing" (2 sider--front side observation notes and predictions.   Then on the back side about physiognomy/humors and YOU!)  Follow the linked hand-out on how to do this (click HERE)  

    Click HERE for a copy of the yellow Chaucer Packet (the front cover has the Chaucerian Shadowing assignment explained).

    NOTE:  If you were absent today and missed our explaining the shadowing experience, follow the instructions outlined HERE. 

  3. BEOWULF PAPER DUE Friday, Dec. 3rd!

    ORDER:

    1. outline

    2. paper itself

    3.  works cited

    4.  any articles/texts (pre-highlighted)

    5.  security copy  (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight

  4. Buybacks Note:  All buybacks are due on the date it says for you on your individual grading sheet. Remember to record results in the pink chart Notes: 1.  Record your results on the yellow and pink sheets in your folder.  You must summarize the teacher comments in the pink boxes and write a goal for the next paper.  Then, record your number of errors in Lit. Analysis Paper column on the yellow technical sheet.) 2.   Be sure to follow directions! There will be a lot less "mercy" for not doing correcting the error correctly this time.   3.  YOU ARE REQUIRED TO WRITE OUT THE WHOLE SENTENCE THAT HAS THE ERROR(S).  DO NOT USE ELLIPSES!  4.  Make sure you do not make ANY NEW ERRORS.  If two or more errors occur in the same sentence, follow the specific directions on how to correct them all together.  5.   TURN BUYBACKS IN ON TIME!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  5.  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE. (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample (NOT PERFECT) of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

     

     

TUESDAY, day 53

BEOWULF FINALE:  BE vs. DO!

 

BE!  Don't just "DO" this term!    

and

Gardner's Grendel

 

startChaucer

Click HERE if you need a copy of the yellow CHAUCER PACKET.

 HELLO, CHAUCER!

CHARACTERIZATION, PHYSIOGNOMY, THE HUMORS, and

CHAUCER'S LIFE

THE ELLESMERE

Check out this website to learn more about the Ellesmere:

http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

If you would like to see more of the Canterbury Cathedral, including an interactive tour, go to this website:

http://www.canterbury-cathedral.org/

the very spot where St. Thomas Becket was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral

Do you see Robby up in the corner teasing me that he was going to throw something on the "hallowed spot"?  Oh, those kids!

Here beginnith the Tales of Canterbury:

1: Whan that aprill with his shoures soote
2: The droghte of march hath perced to the roote,
3: And bathed every veyne in swich licour
4: Of which vertu engendred is the flour;
5: Whan zephirus eek with his sweete breeth
6: Inspired hath in every holt and heeth
7: Tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne
8: Hath in the ram his halve cours yronne,
9: And smale foweles maken melodye,
10: That slepen al the nyght with open ye
11: (so priketh hem nature in hir corages);
12: Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,
13: And palmeres for to seken straunge strondes,
14: To ferne halwes, kowthe in sondry londes;

To see Wally's 1988 and 2006 pictures from Canterbury, the Canterbury Cathedral, and Geoffrey Chaucer School, click HERE!

FOR FUN!  Here are some Chaucer websites to check out:

http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

 

Chaucer: He will rock you!

Today's Quote of the Day:

Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking. -John Maynard Keynes, economist (1883-1946)

Today's allusion:

Lot's wife / Pillar of Salt

Today's Words of the Day:

malleable

attainment

Group Check-in:
  • Progress on paper?
  • LIT TABLE TOPICS: Pick a question for your group and another group that would have applicability to Beowulf and/or Grendel
  •   Exchange with on another classmate's Gardner's Grendel journal. Give "meaty feedback"!  This is worth 3 more points on the journal!
  • Check out CT books
  • Turn in Grendel books
  • Play Alex Doud's Beowulf rap and Gilmore Girls season 6 episode 10. min.)
  • Reactions to Gardner
  1. Canterbury Tales explain tonight's assignment
  2. Gardner's Grendel  "The Nature of Grendel" as a pagan and Christian monster , story of Cain and Abel?, Gardner's Grendel:  What did you think of Gardner's Grendel? What might Grendel be symbolic of?  C/C WA  Gardner's Grendel--reaction and the 5 Q's, Gardner's Grendel, share what it was like if you started to read it
  3. LIT TABLE TOPICS: Pick a question for your group and another group that would have applicability to Beowulf and/or Grendel
  4. Discuss Gardner's Grendel----Reactions to Gardner, follow group agenda and philosophies.    Read excerpts from Gardner's letter to Susan Lewis & students, etc. Astrological Wheel
  5. LIT TABLE TOPICS: Pick a question for your group and another group that would have applicability to Beowulf and/or Grendel
  6. BE!  Don't just "DO" this term!    Review Hero column and round-robin sharing--Do "when you were little? question" and add to WA 1 Reflections, Bill Doherty "Help for Hurried families" notes, Brian willette, Schultz obituary, Todd Bachmann funeral program, Starfish story, chicken soup teacher story, color differences, hero test, "Millionaire Mind" article, Heroes Quiz , 6 degrees, "The Journey" Wixon jewely ads.  After AS heroes discuss modern ideas and share from your WA on heroes--incl male/female differences. Starfish story, Jordan's email, Show 3 min. clip from movie ACROSS THE UNIVERSE--25 min. into it--dinner table scene--HERO??? Did Beowulf do it?  Was his life meaningful? Who are the true Grendels?  the ending  Beowulf's journey to lead a good life--Hrothgar's advice, etc.  What are today's notions of HEROES?--SHARE CHARTS!!!   Maybe show Collins' "The Lanyard" or "Seventh-Grade Viking Warrior"  Taylor Mali

  7. LIT TABLE TOPICS: Pick a question for your group and another group that would have applicability to Beowulf and/or Grendel

  8. BEOWULF FUN THINGS: Memory Dean song--"Beowulf, Captain Hook, & the Albatross"  Shrinklets Beowulf and Beowulf cartoons Woody Allen quote & other Beowulf cartoons, Wixon Jewelry ads  CLICK HERE FOR COPIES    Beowulf cartoon movie:  http://www.newgrounds.com/portal/view/468319  Play Alex Doud's Beowulf rap and Gilmore Girls season 6 episode 10.

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. Grendel HW (25 points)

  2. stamp WA 24 Chaucerian Shadowing (2 sides)

  3. stamp WA 23 Gardner's Grendel (2 sides)

 

 

  1. Respond to PR #3
  2. Assignment  C1:  Chaucer Background Notes & Prologue & Epilogue (10 HW points-- 1-2 sides of a page of notes (6 pts) and answer 4 questions (4 pts)                                                             TASK #1:  Take notes (about 1-2 sides minimum) the Chaucer background info from the "Introduction" (pages xii-xxix) in our CT book. Follow directions in the HW packet.                                                                                   As you do tasks 2, 3, & 4, answer the four questions outlined in the HW packet.  Put the answers right AFTER your notes.  Clearly mark the questions "4 Questions."                                                                          TASK #2:   read Chaucer's prologue in the various versions

     a.)  Middle English in back of your CT book (pages 343 to top of 348)

    Say, can you read the following?  Any clue what's being said?

    "Whan that Aprille with his shoures soote / The droghte of March hath perced to the roote, / And bathed every veyne in swich licour / Of which vertu engendred is the flour;"

       Click on the picture of the Canterbury Cathedral to listen to the first part of Canterbury Tales in Middle English!

                                                                                 b.)  Modern English poetry translation in our black LBT text (pp. 115-119)

     c.)  finally in Modern prose translation in the CT book (pages 1-17)

    TASK #3:    read Chaucer's Retraction (epilogue)  in the CT book(see page  341-342).        

    Finally, do WA 25  "Getting to Know You" for your assigned Chaucer character (1/2 page minimum) and for yourself--presume you are a pilgrim on Chaucer's pilgrimage-- (1/2 page minimum).  NOTE: If you were absent today and didn't get a character assigned to you, choose any character that strikes your fancy!  Do not read the character's tale--just the prologue description.

  3. BEOWULF PAPER DUE FRIDAY, Dec. 5th If you want to create your own topic, a proposed thesis and preliminary outline is required by ASAP!

    Click HERE for a copy of the new 2011 Beowulf paper packet Click HERE for the credentials for the editor/writers of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, vol. 1.   (It's the blue chapter copied in your Beowulf packet).

    BEOWULF PAPER DUE Friday!

    ORDER:

    1. outline

    2. paper itself

    3.  works cited

    4.  any articles/texts (pre-highlighted)

    5.  security copy  (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight

FOR FUN!  Here are some Chaucer websites to check out:

http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

http://www.courses.fas.harvard.edu/~chaucer/cantales.html

http://www.frontiernet.net/~mblow/elahistory.htm

Here's more:

 

 

 

 

WEDNESDAY, day 54

To learn about Baba Brinkman's "lit-hop" inspired by Canterbury Tales, http://www.babasword.com/

To learn about Baba Brinkman's "lit-hop" inspired by Canterbury Tales, http://www.babasword.com/

To learn about Baba Brinkman's "lit-hop" inspired by Canterbury Tales, http://www.babasword.com/

 

 

 

 

 

a Canterbury Tales museum featuring the major tales 

To see this museum's homepage, click here:

http://www.canterburytales.org.uk/home.htm

To learn about Baba Brinkman's "lit-hop" inspired by Canterbury Tales, http://www.babasword.com/

 

 

 

 

 

a Canterbury Tales museum featuring the major tales 

To see this museum's homepage, click here:

http://www.canterburytales.org.uk/home.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group Check-in:
  • Return partner WA 24-26-- Gardner's Grendel journal--give EC coupon for commentary
  • WA 27 "Getting to Know You"  and answer assigned group questions together

  1. Discuss Gardner's Grendel----Reactions to Gardner, follow group agenda and philosophies.    Read excerpts from Gardner's letter to Susan Lewis & students, etc. Astrological Wheel
  2. LIT TABLE TOPICS: Pick a question for your group and another group that would have applicability to Beowulf and/or Grendel
  3. Schultz obituary, Todd Bachmann funeral program, Starfish story, chicken soup teacher story, color differences, hero test, "Millionaire Mind" article, Heroes Quiz , 6 degrees, "The Journey" Wixon jewely ads.  After AS heroes discuss modern ideas and share from your WA on heroes--incl male/female differences. Starfish story, Jordan's email, Show 3 min. clip from movie ACROSS THE UNIVERSE--25 min. into it--dinner table scene--HERO??? Did Beowulf do it?  Was his life meaningful? Who are the true Grendels?  the ending  Beowulf's journey to lead a good life--
  4. Discuss Gardner's Grendel----Reactions to Gardner, follow group agenda and philosophies.    Read excerpts from Gardner's letter to Susan Lewis & students, etc. Astrological Wheel
  5. LIT TABLE TOPICS: Pick a question for your group and another group that would have applicability to Beowulf and/or Grendel

    HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

    1. stamp WA 25 Getting to Know You
    2. Chaucer background notes (6 pts) and 4 Questions (4 pts) = 10 pts

 

  1. FANTASTIC HEALTHY FOOD FRIDAY
  2. DUE FRIDAY!   Assignment C3:   #1.  Read "The Knight's Tale" (pages 18-58--IT'S LONG!) and  #2  do WA 26:  "About the 'Knight's Tale."  (ONE SIDE MINIMUM ADDRESSING 2 TOPICS LISTED BELOW; they are also listed in HW packet).

    1.         Re-read the section in the prologue which introduces the knight (pp. 1-2).

    2.         Now read "The Knight's Tale" in the Lumiansky pp. 18-58.

    As you read, keep track of the characters and their relationships/connections to the gods.  If you haven't studied much mythology, I suggest you look up these gods:  Zeus, Mars, Venus, Diana, Pluto, Saturn.  (Some have Greek names as well as Roman names.

    3.        Do journal entry  WA  “About ‘The Knight’s Tale’” Now reflect on this tale.  Think about your first impressions or reactions or things that make you say "hmmm" or "aha." In your minimum of one side of a page journal entry, respond to the following:

     

    1. TOPIC ONE

     FIRST, CHOOSE ONE OF THESE 6 TOPICS TO RESPOND TO.  You must write at least 1/2 a page on your topic of choice!

     A. Your own observations. . . What struck you as you read the tale?  What bothered you? Which characters seem most important?  With which characters did you identify?  What did you like or dislike about the tale?

    B. Relationship of the teller to the tale. Look back tat the description of the teller in the prologue.  In what ways does this tale “suit the teller”?  In what ways might the teller of the tale connect with the tale’s message or plot?

     C.  Characters  Who are the major characters in the tale?  Who is the protagonist? Who are possible antagonists?  What is the central conflict?  How is it resolved?  What does anyone learn throughout or by the end of the tale?

    D. The tale as a reflection of the Medieval Period  What do we learn about the Medieval Period through the reading of this tale:  What does the tale seem to tell us about what Medieval people were like, what they held as important, how they interacted, what they did with their time?

     E.  Motifs (recurring situations, plot elements, character types, etc.  An example would be the "lovers' triangle.")   What plot elements do you recognize from other works of literature?  What things are repeated within the story itself?  Are there any stereotypes?

    F.  Literary Theory   Which literary theorist(s) (formalist, psychoanalytic, reader response theorist, feminist, Marxist, deconstructor, or New Historicist) would be most interested in this tale?  Why?  About what aspects would the theorist have an interest in?  Now, choose a theory and discuss how that theorist might interpret at least one part of the story or the story as a whole?  your above WA___.


    2. TOPIC TWO

     NOW, CHOOSE ONE OF THESE 5 TOPICS TO RESPOND TO.  You must write at least 1/2 a page on this second topic of choice!

     A.  MEDIEVAL ROMANCE   This story is an example of the most popular literary genre in the Middle Ages called "medieval romance."  Without looking up the definition of "medieval romance," give a thoughtful guess of the definition and characteristics you think a medieval romance has.  What elements in this story are examples of this definition?

    B.  GODS  Discuss the importance/significance of the gods in this story.  What does their intervention suggest about theme?

     C.  GENDER ROLES  Discuss the gender roles in the story.  What do the ways that men and women conduct themselves suggest about the way people of the middle ages viewed men?  women?

     D.   STORY OF THESEUS?   The story was originally 5 times as long as Chaucer's version.  It was written by an Italian poet named Baccaccio.  Chaucer liked it and decided to trim it down and "improve" upon it.  Baccaccio originally titled the story "The Story of Theseus."  Why might that have been a better title in terms of theme?  What is Theseus' role in this story?

     E.  THEME & UNIVERSAL QUESTIONS   Choose ONE of the following popular medieval (and universally age-old) themes.  Discuss what is said about ONE of these in "The Knight's Tale." What universal truths/questions emerge from the tale?  These could relate as much to our lives today as they did to the people of the Medieval Period.  Does Chaucer seem to advocate/promote a certain way of life or viewpoint towards something in the tale?  What's in it for ALL of us?

     •the conflict of free will vs. destiny (fate or fortune)

    •the restoration of order

    •adherence to a chivalric code or a code of honor

    •the tension between head and heart

     

  3. Beowulf paper (due Monday, Dec. 6)  

    Click HERE for a copy of the new 2011 Beowulf paper packet Click HERE for the credentials for the editor/writers of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, vol. 1.   (It's the blue chapter copied in your Beowulf packet).

    BEOWULF PAPER

    ORDER:

    1. outline

    2. paper itself

    3.  works cited

    4.  any articles/texts (pre-highlighted)

    5.  security copy  (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight

 

FOR FUN!  Here are some Chaucer websites to check out:

   Click on the picture of the Canterbury Cathedral to listen to the first part of Canterbury Tales in Middle English!

ABOUT THE ELLESMERE MANUSCRIPT:

http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

To take the humors test!

 www.oneishy.com/personality

MORE!

http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

 

Here is a website Mrs. Stiever suggested you might check out:  www.ala.org  Check this out, too:  http://www.nwaonline.net/articles/2005/08/19/front/01fzbanned.tx

Nikki Hilton with Carina and friends!

 

 

 

 

 

 

THURSDAY, DAY 55
GUTHRIE THEATRE FIELD TRIP THIS THURSDAY, Dec. 2nd!
A Christmas Carol
 

GUTHRIE FIELD TRIP SCHEDULE

Leave:  8:30 a.m. NORTH ENTRANCE

Tour: 10:00-11:00

Lunch 11:00-12:30

PLAY 1:00-3:30

Home by 4:30ish

 

Today's Quotes of the Day: both from A Christmas Carol!

"It is required of every man," the ghost returned, "that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide; and, if that spirit goes not forth in life, it is condemned to do so after death."

and

It is a fair, even-handed, noble adjustment of things, that while there is infection in disease and sorrow, there is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good-humour.

 

Today's allusion:

Bah humbug!

Today's Words of the Day:

none


 

 

 
  1. FANTASTIC HEALTHY FOOD FRIDAY
  2. DUE FRIDAY!   Assignment C3:   #1.  Read "The Knight's Tale" (pages 18-58--IT'S LONG!) and  #2  do WA 26:  "About the 'Knight's Tale." (ONE SIDE MINIMUM ADDRESSING 2 TOPICS LISTED BELOW; they are also listed in HW packet). Click HERE for a copy of this assignment.

    1.         Re-read the section in the prologue which introduces the knight (pp. 1-2).

    2.         Now read "The Knight's Tale" in the Lumiansky pp. 18-58.

     

    As you read, keep track of the characters and their relationships/connections to the gods.  If you haven't studied much mythology, I suggest you look up these gods:  Zeus, Mars, Venus, Diana, Pluto, Saturn.  (Some have Greek names as well as Roman names.

    3.        Do journal entry  WA  “About ‘The Knight’s Tale’” Now reflect on this tale.  Think about your first impressions or reactions or things that make you say "hmmm" or "aha." In your minimum of one side of a page journal entry, respond to the following:

    1. TOPIC ONE

     FIRST, CHOOSE ONE OF THESE 6 TOPICS TO RESPOND TO.  You must write at least 1/2 a page on your topic of choice!

     A. Your own observations. . . What struck you as you read the tale?  What bothered you? Which characters seem most important?  With which characters did you identify?  What did you like or dislike about the tale?

    B. Relationship of the teller to the tale. Look back tat the description of the teller in the prologue.  In what ways does this tale “suit the teller”?  In what ways might the teller of the tale connect with the tale’s message or plot?

     C.  Characters  Who are the major characters in the tale?  Who is the protagonist? Who are possible antagonists?  What is the central conflict?  How is it resolved?  What does anyone learn throughout or by the end of the tale?

    D. The tale as a reflection of the Medieval Period  What do we learn about the Medieval Period through the reading of this tale:  What does the tale seem to tell us about what Medieval people were like, what they held as important, how they interacted, what they did with their time?

     E.  Motifs (recurring situations, plot elements, character types, etc.  An example would be the "lovers' triangle.")   What plot elements do you recognize from other works of literature?  What things are repeated within the story itself?  Are there any stereotypes?

    F.  Literary Theory   Which literary theorist(s) (formalist, psychoanalytic, reader response theorist, feminist, Marxist, deconstructor, or New Historicist) would be most interested in this tale?  Why?  About what aspects would the theorist have an interest in?  Now, choose a theory and discuss how that theorist might interpret at least one part of the story or the story as a whole?  your above WA___.


    2. TOPIC TWO

     NOW, CHOOSE ONE OF THESE 5 TOPICS TO RESPOND TO.  You must write at least 1/2 a page on this second topic of choice!

     A.  MEDIEVAL ROMANCE   This story is an example of the most popular literary genre in the Middle Ages called "medieval romance."  Without looking up the definition of "medieval romance," give a thoughtful guess of the definition and characteristics you think a medieval romance has.  What elements in this story are examples of this definition?

    B.  GODS  Discuss the importance/significance of the gods in this story.  What does their intervention suggest about theme?

     C.  GENDER ROLES  Discuss the gender roles in the story.  What do the ways that men and women conduct themselves suggest about the way people of the middle ages viewed men?  women?

     D.   STORY OF THESEUS?   The story was originally 5 times as long as Chaucer's version.  It was written by an Italian poet named Baccaccio.  Chaucer liked it and decided to trim it down and "improve" upon it.  Baccaccio originally titled the story "The Story of Theseus."  Why might that have been a better title in terms of theme?  What is Theseus' role in this story?

     E.  THEME & UNIVERSAL QUESTIONS   Choose ONE of the following popular medieval (and universally age-old) themes.  Discuss what is said about ONE of these in "The Knight's Tale." What universal truths/questions emerge from the tale?  These could relate as much to our lives today as they did to the people of the Medieval Period.  Does Chaucer seem to advocate/promote a certain way of life or viewpoint towards something in the tale?  What's in it for ALL of us?

     •the conflict of free will vs. destiny (fate or fortune)

    •the restoration of order

    •adherence to a chivalric code or a code of honor

    •the tension between head and heart

     

  3. Beowulf paper (due Monday, Dec. 6)  

    Click HERE for a copy of the new 2011 Beowulf paper packet Click HERE for the credentials for the editor/writers of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, vol. 1.   (It's the blue chapter copied in your Beowulf packet).

    BEOWULF PAPER

    ORDER:

    1. outline

    2. paper itself

    3.  works cited

    4.  any articles/texts (pre-highlighted)

    5.  security copy  (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight

 

FOR FUN!  Here are some Chaucer websites to check out:

   Click on the picture of the Canterbury Cathedral to listen to the first part of Canterbury Tales in Middle English!

ABOUT THE ELLESMERE MANUSCRIPT:

http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

To take the humors test!

 www.oneishy.com/personality

MORE!

http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

 

Here is a website Mrs. Stiever suggested you might check out:  www.ala.org  Check this out, too:  http://www.nwaonline.net/articles/2005/08/19/front/01fzbanned.tx

 

 
FRIDAY, day 53

The KNIGHT'S TALE

 

Arcite and Palomon:

The Knight from A Knight's Tale

Arcite and Palomon:

     

Today's Quotes of the Day:

As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.  ~John Fitzgerald Kennedy

We often take for granted the very things that most deserve our gratitude.  ~Cynthia Ozick

Today's allusion:

stealing someone's thunder

Today's Words of the Day:

sanguine

indignant

phillip

morose

 

Group Check-in:
  • How's the Beowulf paper coming?
  • How did you like the play?
  1.  
    1. Discuss Gardner's Grendel----Reactions to Gardner, follow group agenda and philosophies.    Read excerpts from Gardner's letter to Susan Lewis & students, etc. Astrological Wheel
    2. LIT TABLE TOPICS: Pick a question for your group and another group that would have applicability to Beowulf and/or Grendel
    3. Start Chaucer background-CT packet, p. 8  Discuss Chaucer's Life--methods of characterization, Chaucer's approval/disapproval of characters, sample charactersCT enigmatic nature, Medieval triangle, premise for the pilgrimage, how Chaucer fits in historically (see CT packet p. 6), etc. 

      Tell about Ellesmere Manuscript and Huntingdon Library--show websites:

      http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

      http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

      http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

      IF NOT DONE WITH HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, DO THIS: MIDDLE ENGLISH, etc. Samuel Johnson's Dictionary. Early Modern English and Shakespeare's impact.  Talk about slurvish.   maybe (or do with Chaucer) Modern English--Marketplace activity--Yes, Mother I have 3 activity, cognates, dialect vs. legitimate language, härma, Folke Hedblom's research, pinka, Chaucer school incidents with language, "w" in Swedish and å, ä, and ö letters. Immersion language teaching?  CLV www.concordialanguagevillages.org If time, read "English is a Crazy Language" (assign 5 people to help) and Brian Russell's poem, "The Fall of English"

      1. Teaching in Canterbury--show pictures
      2. WHY IS THIS PROLOGUE SO IMPORTANT? (list ideas such as social document, "tale suits the teller," foreshadows later events and themes in the tales, shows us Chaucer's biases and introduces A/R theme--the prioress--read in between the linesRoles of Women and importance of prologue--
      3. Show A Knight’s Tale film clip—Stories for the People (2 min. 10 sec)
      4. The genres reflected in Canterbury Tales
      5. Ch. Packet pp. 9-10 Physiognomy and the Humors. More in Chaucer Packet pp. 3-5 articles:  TEEN magazine physiognomy ex. & Twin Cities personalities,  Lookism articles, “dress for success” articles, Goldsworthy, bus story about Minnesota sanguine, Julia's website to find out more about the humors
      6. The PROLOGUE!  What is "PHYSIOGNOMY"? Define physiognomy (use  p. 9 Ch. Packet) and jot down examples from CT AND define humors (CT pac. p. 9) and use overheads.  Talk about husband/wife (melancholy & sanguine) who go around country lecturing on the this. Discuss ex. of humors in CT:  p. 10 physician, franklin, Chanticleer (red bile), Goldsworthy, bus story about Minnesota sanguine  If time, show Shallow Hal film clip—3 min. 20 sec. (ff to 37:00)   More in Chaucer Packet pp. 3-5 articles:  TEEN magazine physiognomy ex. & Twin Cities personalities,  Lookism articles, “dress for success” articles, Goldsworthy, bus story about Minnesota sanguine, Julia's website to find out more about the humors  MORE HUMORS STUFF:  Click HERE for HUMORS and DIET article and HERE for historical way HUMORS turned into COLORS and HERE for Humor Me Folger article.
      7. STUDENTS READ HUMORS POEM ALOUD--Click HERE or HERE for a copy of the HUMORS poem.
      8.  FIG questions for "The Knight's Tale" 1 of each level--pink = level 1 factual, blue = level 2 interpretive, green = level 3 global.   Click HERE to refresh your memory as to how to do FIG Q's.   Click HERE if you need a copy of the yellow CHAUCER PACKET.     Also, if assigned, do the BLUE 2-SIDED WORKSHEET (10 pts) ON THIS TALE.  CLICK HERE IF YOU NEED A COPY.
    Teaching in Canterbury--show pictures
  2. Continue Chaucer background-CT packet, p. 8  Discuss Chaucer's Life--methods of characterization, Chaucer's approval/disapproval of characters, sample charactersCT enigmatic nature, Medieval triangle, premise for the pilgrimage, how Chaucer fits in historically (see CT packet p. 6), etc. 

    Tell about Ellesmere Manuscript and Huntingdon Library--show websites:

    http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

    http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

    http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

    IF NOT DONE WITH HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, DO THIS: MIDDLE ENGLISH, etc. Samuel Johnson's Dictionary. Early Modern English and Shakespeare's impact.  Talk about slurvish.   maybe (or do with Chaucer) Modern English--Marketplace activity--Yes, Mother I have 3 activity, cognates, dialect vs. legitimate language, härma, Folke Hedblom's research, pinka, Chaucer school incidents with language, "w" in Swedish and å, ä, and ö letters. Immersion language teaching?  CLV www.concordialanguagevillages.org If time, read "English is a Crazy Language" (assign 5 people to help) and Brian Russell's poem, "The Fall of English"

     

  3. WHY IS THIS PROLOGUE SO IMPORTANT? (list ideas such as social document, "tale suits the teller," foreshadows later events and themes in the tales, shows us Chaucer's biases and introduces A/R theme--the prioress--read in between the lines Roles of Women and importance of prologue--
  4. Show A Knight’s Tale film clip—Stories for the People (2 min. 10 sec)
  5. WHY IS THIS PROLOGUE SO IMPORTANT? (list ideas such as social document, "tale suits the teller," foreshadows later events and themes in the tales, shows us Chaucer's biases and introduces A/R theme--the prioress--read in between the lines Roles of Women and importance of prologue--
  6. The genres reflected in Canterbury Tales
  7. Teaching in Canterbury--show pictures
  8. WHY IS THIS PROLOGUE SO IMPORTANT? (list ideas such as social document, "tale suits the teller," foreshadows later events and themes in the tales, shows us Chaucer's biases and introduces A/R theme--the knight, squire, prioress--read in between the lines Roles of Women and importance of prologue--
  9. Show A Knight’s Tale film clip—Stories for the People (2 min. 10 sec) and Sports Herald
  10. The genres reflected in Canterbury Tales
  11. Intro to CT paper--brainstorm places  Chaucer packet p. 7 #4.  Do #2 and #3 in Chaucer packet p. 7--
  12. If time, "THE KNIGHT'S TALE" Small groups--work on your assigned questions from "The Knight's Tale" agenda(ONE PER GROUP)
  13. If time, "Knight's Tale" discussion:  initial reactions,  Boethius, Boccacio poem, medieval romance genre characteristics, group work on assigned questions: roles of women, role of gods/goddesses, universal questions,  themes (free will vs. destiny, chivalric duty & honor), why the original story was called the "Story of Theseus."  Use AGENDA.

 

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. WA 30 Miller and Reeve's tales (10 [pts.)

 

 

 

 

 

  1.  Study for Monday's ALLUSION TEST Click HERE for a copy of all the allusions, their background, and their meanings.
  2. WA 27 "The Miller's Tale" & "The Reeve's Tale" and CENSORSHIP--2 sides MINIMUM (10 pts.) OVER  3 TOPICS: "Thin Gruel," "Miller's Tale" & "Reeve's Tale", Sal's Thesis! (OLD ASSIGNMENT C6)   TODAY YOU GOT A SALMON SET OF HAND-OUTS TO USE FOR THIS JOURNAL.  FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS ON THE COVER PAGE CAREFULLY!  Make sure you label everything clearly!  YOU WILL DEVOTE ABOUT 1/3 OF THE JOURNAL TO EACH OF THE THREE TOPICS.  IF YOU MISSED THIS COMPLETE PACKET, CLICK HERE.                                                                                          First, for the FRONT SIDE OF THE JOURNAL--2 topics: Read "Thin Gruel" and respond.  Then, read "the Miller's Tale" and "the Reeve's Tale" and write on a topic of the choices listed in on the cover of the salmon hand-out.                                                                       Now, for the BACK SIDE--Read Bill Salinger's master's thesis. Answer the Q's about Salinger's thesis and respond.  If you only need a copy of "Thin Gruel," click HERE.  If you only need a copy of Salinger's thesis, click HERE.   If you were absent and didn't get a copy of the yellow CT packet about the Prologue/Physiognomy/Chaucer Background, click here---> CT packet  If you need a copy of "Thin Gruel" and Mr. Salinger's essay, click HERE
  3. Beowulf paper (due Monday, Dec. 6)  

    Click HERE for a copy of the new 2011 Beowulf paper packet Click HERE for the credentials for the editor/writers of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, vol. 1.  BEOWULF PAPER--the ORDER:  1. outline  2. paper itself  3.  works cited   4.  any supplementary articles/texts (pre-highlighted) which Wally didn't supply  5.  any supplementary articles/texts (no need to pre-highlight) which Wally supplied  6.  security copy (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight on day the paper is due!) Click HERE for the credentials of Donaldson and David who authored the chapter about the heroic ideal from "The Middle Ages" in the Norton Anthology of English Literature (It's the blue chapter copied in your Beowulf packet).

    BEOWULF PAPER

    ORDER:

    1. outline

    2. paper itself

    3.  works cited

    4.  any articles/texts (pre-highlighted)

    5.  security copy  (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight

  4. CHAUCER PAPER COMING UP NEXT!  If you like, read the purple packet outlining the CT paper (due December 22).  For a copy of this packet, click HERE. Start familiarizing yourself with the CT paper (remember NO BUYBACKS!!!) (technical aspects graded by avg. errors per page!) Read the purple packet outlining the CT paper  For a copy of this packet, click HERE.  To see a copy of the packet and/or print off the grading sheet, click HERE.  Click HERE for a copy of brainstormed IDEAS FOR MEETING PLACES.