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 Week 11: November 15-18, 2010

A Midsummer Night's Dream Field Trip PICTURES!

Wednesday Nov. 17, 2010

To see all the Park Square Field Trip pictures I took Nov. 17th,

click on the link below for the WEB ALBUM

http://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011ImmersionDayAtParkSquareTheatreNov172010?authkey=Gv1sRgCNuJmrKL6bv6dQ&feat=email#

or click HERE for the WEB PAGE.

To see all the Park Square Field Trip pictures I took Nov. 17th,

click on the link below for the WEB ALBUM

http://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011ImmersionDayAtParkSquareTheatreNov172010?authkey=Gv1sRgCNuJmrKL6bv6dQ&feat=email#

or click HERE for the WEB PAGE.

To see our latest class pictures, click HERE or

http://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011Adv12ClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIjW1u22xe2A3gE#

A Midsummer Night's Dream Field Trip!

Wednesday Nov. 17, 2010

Schedule of events

7:45 a.m. MEET AT ACTIVITY CENTER DOORS

                                    8:40      Students arrive and get settled

                            8:40-8:50       Welcome students, explain the day and introduce workshop instructors

                            8:50-8:55       Students move to small group workshop sessions

    

                8:55-9:55       Students attend small group workshops of their choice

              9:55-10:00       Students return to theatre

            10:00-10:30       Students attend Build a Moment in the theatre

            10:35-11:15       Lunch at surrounding cafes

            11:15-11:30       Students seated in reserved seats for performance

              11:30-2:05       Performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream

                2:05-2:40       Post Show Discussion with A Midsummer Night’s Dream cast members.

DUE MONDAY! +3 point EXTRA CREDIT COUPON--Write a one page (TYPED and DOUBLE-SPACED) letter to Park Square Theatre. Give your thanks or  feedback on your experience or even your ideas on the themes and universal questions or even personal connections to the production of A Midsummer Night's Dream  .  Address the letter to either Mary Finnerty (educational director), or  Jeff Hal-Flavin (director), or to one of the actors (Click http://www.parksquaretheatre.org for a cast list) or to one of the workshop teachers (Rapier = Brian Hessler, Unarmed Stage Combat, Makeup = Tessie Bundick, Acting  = Andrea Wollenberg, Improv = Jen Scott).    Don't forget to keep your ticket to use for a FREE ticket for a future Park Square evening show sometime this year.  Click http://www.parksquaretheatre.org/plays/index.php  for their website to see what's coming up!

AND

The End of BEOWULF,

Gardner's Grendel

 

To see our latest class pictures, click HERE or

http://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011Adv12ClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIjW1u22xe2A3gE#

For a copy of the 2010 LIST OF JOURNALS, click  HERE.

Click HERE if you need a copy of the yellow CHAUCER PACKET.

Lit. Theory paper is due on Tuesday, Nov. 16th

To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE.  To print a copy of reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE.

ORDER TO TURN IN THE PAPER:

  • everything goes in folder (if partners, put both folders inside each other)
  • grading sheet with comment box filled out
  • the paper (with 3 doc. checks highlighted & label them clearly doc. check 1, 2, 3 in the body of the paper AND on the actual photocopies)
  • works cited
  • source(s) from class used (highlight doc. check)
  • all other sources  (highlight doc. check)
  • the folk/fairy tale  (highlight doc. check)
  • SOME LIT THEORY PAPER REMINDERS (rev. 11.11.10):

    1.  NOTE ABOUT THE SOURCES WALLY PROVIDED: the Bressler, Appleman, and Dobie TITLED articles are from books on literary theory.  The TITLED articles by Smith and Murfin appear in the back of either Frankenstein by Mary Shelley or Hamlet by William Shakespeare.  Follow the format in the Survival Manual pp. WC 17-18 for "When you use only a titled chapter or titled article in a book or pamphlet." 

    Mary Shelley's name and William Shakespeare's name will appear on your works-cited page but NOT in any parenthetical references.  By the way, her name is spelled SHELLEY.

    2.  Stories in anthologies are in quotation marks.   ex. "Cinderella"    Stories that are published as books are italicized.   ex.  Cinderella

    3.  For a copy of how the paper should be organized, click HERE.

    4.  If you do the paper with a partner, turn in one copy of the paper, with both names listed in the heading.  For the pagination, type both last names with an "and" in between them.  Turn in one grading sheet, but make sure both of you have put your comments in the comment box.  The paper should be slipped into both folders.

    5.  Here's how you write the following:  PhD or  master's degree or MA.

    6.  Be consistent with capitalization.  Either use "Reader Response" or "reader response."  Pay attention to how your sources capitalize the theories.  Pick a style and be consistent.

    7.  ABOUT HIGHLIGHTING ON PAPER AND SOURCES!  Do not highlight anything in the actual paper.  Photocopy the pages from the sources you have used.  Only highlight what you used in the sources you have borrowed from the bins AND those YOU have located on your own so that I may easily locate the place on the source for the doc. checks.  You do not have to highlight anything from the folk/fairy tales.  If the folk/fair tales are not paginated, please do so in pencil on the pages OR using post-its.

    8.  Make sure you punctuate dialogue and any stage directions correctly.  Make sure you use the Survival Manual pages GRS 11-13 to help you do this.

    9.  Be sure you document the storyline frequently in the section where you are retelling the story.  Unless you have a direct quote, it is best to do it episodically.

    10.  Read the GRADING SHEET carefully,  so you don't miss anything required.  Be sure to establish credibility--both for your narrator as well as the REAL sources you use.

    11.  E-mail or voice mail Wally (952 975-4303) if you have any questions.

    12. The paper must be turned in by 3:00 on the due date or it's late (-10% per day late)!

    13.  Including THOUGHTS can be tricky. The thoughts are indicated in BLUE.

    Example writing the paper in 1st person:

    I walk into the classroom really excited about the hour I am about to spend with the students in Ms. Anderson's Literary Theory 101 class.  I hope they will enjoy hearing about Thumbelina through feminist perspective and maybe will want to take my own online course as a result. 

    I clear my throat and say, "Good morning, class." I wonder if anyone is listening.  I yell, "Hello!  My name is Sara Madison."  They are still talking!  Is there no discipline in the college classrooms today?  I'll try again.  "Quiet!" I screamed. Finally, I get their attention.

    Example writing the paper in 3rd person:

    The professor thought, "I wonder if he is actually going to ask that question."   
     
    Then Professor Madison asked, "How many of you have read the story?"  She speculated that no one had.  Then she added, "Let me phrase it another way, then." She wondered if the hour would ever end and whether teaching was really her calling after all.

    14. NOTE:  Be careful with tense!  Are you going to write the paper as the hour enfolds?  If so, you will be writing primarily in the present tense when it comes to the classroom events.  You can also choose to write the paper as if the event has already transpired; you would be reflecting back on how the events unfolded.  In that case, you would write primarily in the past tense.

    15.  Pay special attention to stories that are "compiled by" or "retold by" or "adapted by."  They require special treatment for works cited and parenthetical documentation. See page WC 12 for how to do a translator, editor, compiler, or adapter.  

    Click  HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)  Also, check out the section WITH EDITOR or TRANSLATOR or COMPILER   in the PDQ section of the Survival Manual.  Click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

  1. Beowulf paper (due Wednesday, Dec. 1 ) If you want to create your own topic, a proposed thesis and preliminary outline is required by ASAP! Click HERE for a copy of the new 2011 Beowulf paper packet Click HERE for the credentials for the editor/writers of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, vol. 1.  BEOWULF PAPER--the ORDER:  1. outline  2. paper itself  3.  works cited   4.  any supplementary articles/texts (pre-highlighted) which Wally didn't supply  5.  any supplementary articles/texts (no need to pre-highlight) which Wally supplied  6.  security copy (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight on day the paper is due!) Click HERE for the credentials of Donaldson and David who authored the chapter about the heroic ideal from "The Middle Ages" in the Norton Anthology of English Literature (It's the blue chapter copied in your Beowulf packet).

    BEOWULF PAPER DUE Wed., Dec. 1st!

    ORDER:

    1. outline

    2. paper itself

    3.  works cited

    4.  any articles/texts (pre-highlighted)

    5.  security copy  (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight

Click HERE if you need a copy of the buff-colored BEOWULF 2010 packet Click HERE  if you need any hand-outs from the packet (NOTE:  it has the old cover assignment sheet on the top.  Just scroll past those pages to get to the hand-outs you need.)

EPHS ENGLISH DEPARTMENT SURVIVAL MANUAL  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the COVER with table of contents  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the GRS (Grammar Rules Summary) section--yellow

click HERE for the MSF (Manuscript Formatting Rules) section--yellow

click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) SHORT FORM--pink

CLICK HERE for the BUYBACK PACKET (rev. 2008) 

  For a sample template, click HERE--> SAMPLE TEMPLATE FOR BUYBACKS (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  CLICK HERE FOR THE ACE simplified version without the categories of errors.

Buybacks (rev. 2010)!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

 If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.

 (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

 

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    As Chaucer would say,  "Whan that Aprille with his shoures soote / The droghte of March hath perced to the roote, / And bathed every veyne in swich licour / Of which vertu engendred is the flour;"

    DATE In-Class plan Homework (due next day almost always):
    MONDAY, day 45

    NEW CLASSES--2nd term!  Welcome!

    BE!  Don't just "DO" this term! 

     

    BEOWULF MEETS THE DRAGON!

    Wiglaf is my hero!

          

    For a goofy youtube English project based on Beowulf, click here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shfMUInPxDw

    playdough GRENDELS!

     

    To see our latest class pictures, click HERE or

    http://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011Adv12ClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIjW1u22xe2A3gE#

    For a current list of all 2010 journals assigned, click HERE!

    synchronicity--ASU website and Charlie Bethel calls: 

    http://asunews.asu.edu/20081030_beowulf

     

    Today's Quote of the Day:

    Ink is handicapped, in a way, because you can blow up a man with gunpowder in half a second, while it may take twenty years to blow him up with a book. But the gunpowder destroys itself along with its victim, while a book can keep on exploding for centuries. -Christopher Morley, writer (1890-1957)

    Today's allusion:

    Lot's Wife/Pillar of Salt

    Today's Words of the Day:

    demogogue

    dessicate

    schism

     

    1. Group Check-in:
      • Weekend?
      • Progress on paper?
      • Group work on parts  1-3 and compare battle charts
      • CC WA 19 Gardner's Grendel
      • Cain and Abel story?
    2. BEOWULF INTRO

      1. What's in a name? & HEROES

        Share WA 17:  How did you get your name?

        How to write your name in runes!

        http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/vikings/runesright.html Click HERE for a copy of the Runic Writing Hand-out!

        and HEROES

      2. BEOWULF INTRO! Initial reactions to reading Beowulf, parts 1 and 2? What worked?  What didn't?  Woody Allen Annie Hall clip and Gilmore Girls season 6 episode 10.  For a copy of the Beowulf family tree, click HERE! 
      3. BEOWULF TRANSLATIONS: Show the words in the first 11 lines.  Play lines 1-11 in Old English, read the first 11 in Raffel version, then play the first 11 lines in Heaney.  Swedish version, too.   Check out this cool Beowulf translation website!  http://www.beowulftranslations.net/journey.shtml
      4. BEOWULF:  FIRST WORD ("in medias res"--typical of epics) Look at three translations of the first page and how they differ--the first words (OE—Hwaet , Heany—so, Raffel—hear me, Kennedy—Lo!, Abrams prose—Yes!, Bethel—Listen up, Quiet! others?)
      5. Look at the kennings--nagellacksborttagningsmedel, the caesura, the alliteration
      6. Look at Raffel's translation and how hints of culture, themes, etc., occur in the first page!
      7. Announcement of the theme--"what makes a good king?"  What makes a good life? 
      8. Share WA 19  part 1--make transparencies--AS/MED charts, quotes, heroic ideal, and compare battle charts
      9. Define the AS idea of an EPIC HERO--use the worksheet in the Beowulf packet and chapter from the Norton Anthology on "The Heroic Ideal" maybe: Watch "The Epic Hero" video--take notes!
      10. BEOWULF  Who or what is Grendel--really?  Meet Grendel p. 26 Raffel and p. 9 in the Heany--Listen on tape 
      11. Cain & Abel story If not before, watch Cain and Abel video (22 min.)
      12. Gardner's Grendel "The Nature of Grendel" as a pagan and Christian monster
      13. Play Alex Doud's Beowulf rap and Gilmore Girls season 6 episode 10.
      1. g
      2. Beowulf Battle Chart--c/c column 1--Fight with Grendel Click HERE for the chart
      3. Zemeckis Beowulf--Watch 10 min. of battle with Grendel

       

      Wally and Adv. 12 at the I-Max to see the opening of the Zemecki's Beowulf Movie at Midnight Nov. 2007

      For Roger Ebert's review of the new 3-D Zemeckis Beowulf movie, click here: http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071114/REVIEWS/71115001

      BEOWULF  Who or what is Grendel--really?  Meet Grendel p. 26 Raffel and p. 9 in the Heany--Listen on tape 
    3. Cain & Abel story If not before, watch Cain and Abel video (22 min.)
    4. What is Grendel--really?  Meet Grendel p. 26 Raffel and p. 9 in the Heany--Listen on tape 
    5. BEOWULF BATTLE CHART--Begin to discuss the differences between the first and second battles--venue, use of weapons, etc.  Click HERE for the battle chart
    6. REACTION TO GARDNER'S GRENDEL Gardner's Grendel "The Nature of Grendel" as a pagan and Christian monster , story of Cain and Abel?, Gardner's Grendel:  What did you think of Gardner's Grendel? What might Grendel be symbolic of?  C/C WA  Gardner's Grendel--reaction and the 5 Q's, Gardner's Grendel, share what it was like if you started to read it

    HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

    1. WA 20  Beowulf part 2--2nd side (Quote and Lay)

    1. Work on your Lit. Theory paper.  Due date on Tuesday, Nov. 16th--the day before our field trip!   For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper, click HERE.  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE.

      ORDER TO TURN IN THE PAPER:

      • everything goes in folder (if partners, put both folders inside each other)
      • grading sheet with comment box filled out
      • the paper
      • works cited
      • source(s) from class used (no need to highlight)
      • allother sources (no need to highlight)
      • the folk/fairy tale (no need to highlight)
      • security copy or e-mail toWally by midnight lwallenberg@edenpr.org

        To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE 

        SOME LIT THEORY PAPER REMINDERS (rev. 11.11.10):

        1.  NOTE ABOUT THE SOURCES WALLY PROVIDED: the Bressler, Appleman, and Dobie TITLED articles are from books on literary theory.  The TITLED articles by Smith and Murfin appear in the back of either Frankenstein by Mary Shelley or Hamlet by William Shakespeare.  Follow the format in the Survival Manual pp. WC 17-18 for "When you use only a titled chapter or titled article in a book or pamphlet." 

        Mary Shelley's name and William Shakespeare's name will appear on your works-cited page but NOT in any parenthetical references.  By the way, her name is spelled SHELLEY.

        2.  Stories in anthologies are in quotation marks.   ex. "Cinderella"    Stories that are published as books are italicized.   ex.  Cinderella

        3.  For a copy of how the paper should be organized, click HERE.

        4.  If you do the paper with a partner, turn in one copy of the paper, with both names listed in the heading.  For the pagination, type both last names with an "and" in between them.  Turn in one grading sheet, but make sure both of you have put your comments in the comment box.  The paper should be slipped into both folders.

        5.  Here's how you write the following:  PhD or  master's degree or MA.

        6.  Be consistent with capitalization.  Either use "Reader Response" or "reader response."  Pay attention to how your sources capitalize the theories.  Pick a style and be consistent.

        7.  ABOUT HIGHLIGHTING ON PAPER AND SOURCES!  Do not highlight anything in the actual paper.  Photocopy the pages from the sources you have used.  Only highlight what you used in the sources you have borrowed from the bins AND those YOU have located on your own so that I may easily locate the place on the source for the doc. checks.  You do not have to highlight anything from the folk/fairy tales.  If the folk/fair tales are not paginated, please do so in pencil on the pages OR using post-its.

        8.  Make sure you punctuate dialogue and any stage directions correctly.  Make sure you use the Survival Manual pages GRS 11-13 to help you do this.

        9.  Be sure you document the storyline frequently in the section where you are retelling the story.  Unless you have a direct quote, it is best to do it episodically.

        10.  Read the GRADING SHEET carefully,  so you don't miss anything required.  Be sure to establish credibility--both for your narrator as well as the REAL sources you use.

        11.  E-mail or voice mail Wally (952 975-4303) if you have any questions.

        12. The paper must be turned in by 3:00 on the due date or it's late (-10% per day late)!

        13.  Including THOUGHTS can be tricky. The thoughts are indicated in BLUE.

        Example writing the paper in 1st person:

        I walk into the classroom really excited about the hour I am about to spend with the students in Ms. Anderson's Literary Theory 101 class.  I hope they will enjoy hearing about Thumbelina through feminist perspective and maybe will want to take my own online course as a result. 

        I clear my throat and say, "Good morning, class." I wonder if anyone is listening.  I yell, "Hello!  My name is Sara Madison."  They are still talking!  Is there no discipline in the college classrooms today?  I'll try again.  "Quiet!" I screamed. Finally, I get their attention.

        Example writing the paper in 3rd person:

        The professor thought, "I wonder if he is actually going to ask that question."   
         
        Then Professor Madison asked, "How many of you have read the story?"  She speculated that no one had.  Then she added, "Let me phrase it another way, then." She wondered if the hour would ever end and whether teaching was really her calling after all.

        14. NOTE:  Be careful with tense!  Are you going to write the paper as the hour enfolds?  If so, you will be writing primarily in the present tense when it comes to the classroom events.  You can also choose to write the paper as if the event has already transpired; you would be reflecting back on how the events unfolded.  In that case, you would write primarily in the past tense.

        15.  Pay special attention to stories that are "compiled by" or "retold by" or "adapted by."  They require special treatment for works cited and parenthetical documentation. See page WC 12 for how to do a translator, editor, compiler, or adapter.  

        Click  HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)  Also, check out the section WITH EDITOR or TRANSLATOR or COMPILER   in the PDQ section of the Survival Manual.  Click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

    2. By Monday, November 22nd, read Gardner's Grendel.  For a copy of the "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet," click HERE! As you read, do the following on your own notebook paper (unless you buy your own book--available in the school store--in which case you can do this note-taking right on the covers and extra pages in the book):   1. keep a character list, 2. on the Zodiac Wheel (the second page of the hand-out "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet"), jot down a quick plot synopsis for each chapter.  3. 3 Chapter Analyses Charts on Grendel Worksheet:  Each Beowulf group will be assigned 3 chapters to become experts on.   Here are the assigned chapters:  BEOWULF--chaps. 1-3, GRENDEL--chaps.  4-6, MOMMY--chaps. 7-9, DRAGONS--chaps. 10-12. On the front of the "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet" (click HERE for a copy of this worksheet),  there is a a chart for you to fill out for your group's assigned chapters.  Note that there are only two columns when there should be three.  So, for your 3rd assigned chapter, draw one more column on the back of the first page to put your comments.  4. consult a copy of  a zodiac chart (see HERE for a list of the zodiac signs, or click http://www.psychicguild.com/horoscopes_explained.php or click HERE for the Zodiac wheel in your "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet") and discuss how one of the zodiac signs is present/symbolic in each of the 12 chapters.  5. Also, as you read, jot down a list of your personal questions. NOTE:  When you finish the novel, you also will do 2 WA's: (worth 5 journal points each.  You are to choose  3 of the 5 choices "GG" Journal Topics.  4 choices are listed on the page 2 of the Beowulf packet.  The 5th topic (not listed on your blue Beowulf packet) is to read the  last blue essay  in the Beowulf packet which addresses Gardner's Grendel and Beowulf's Grendel as both monster and human.  It's really interesting!  Write a page response.  For a copy of the topics, click HERE.
    3. Read and highlight purple Beowulf paper packet carefully.  You may want to re-read part oneof Beowulf marking and noting possibilities for this paper.  NOTE! An outline for this paper is required.  If you want to create your own topic, a proposed thesis and preliminary outline is required a week in advance. The Beowulf paper will be due Wednesday, Dec. 1st (after Thanksgiving).  Click HERE for a copy of the Beowulf paper packet.
    4. Beowulf paper (due Wednesday, Dec. 1 ) If you want to create your own topic, a proposed thesis and preliminary outline is required by ASAP! Click HERE for a copy of the new 2011 Beowulf paper packet Click HERE for the credentials for the editor/writers of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, vol. 1.  BEOWULF PAPER--the ORDER:  1. outline  2. paper itself  3.  works cited   4.  any supplementary articles/texts (pre-highlighted) which Wally didn't supply  5.  any supplementary articles/texts (no need to pre-highlight) which Wally supplied  6.  security copy (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight on day the paper is due!) Click HERE for the credentials of Donaldson and David who authored the chapter about the heroic ideal from "The Middle Ages" in the Norton Anthology of English Literature (It's the blue chapter copied in your Beowulf packet).

      BEOWULF PAPER DUE Wed., Dec. 1st!

      ORDER:

      1. outline

      2. paper itself

      3.  works cited

      4.  any articles/texts (pre-highlighted)

      5.  security copy  (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight

    5.  

    For a copy of the 2010 LIST OF JOURNALS, click  HERE.

     

     

    TUESDAY, day 46

    Lit theory paper

    due TODAY

    • ORDER TO TURN IN THE PAPER:

      • everything goes in folder (if partners, put both folders inside each other)
      • grading sheet filled out
      • paper
      • works cited
      • source from class used (no need to highlight)
      • all other sources (no need to highlight)
      • the folk/fairy tale (no need to highlight)
      • SECURITY copy--not in folder email to Wally by midnight lwallenberg@edenpr.org

        

    Lit. Theory paper

    DUE 

    To print a copy of reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE.

    ORDER TO TURN IN THE PAPER:

    • everything goes in folder (if partners, put both folders inside each other)
    • grading sheet with comment box filled out
    • the paper (with 3 doc. checks highlighted & label them clearly doc. check 1, 2, 3 in the body of the paper AND on the actual photocopies)
    • works cited (highlight doc. check sources)
    • source(s) from class used (highlight doc. check)
    • all other sources  (highlight doc. check)
    • the folk/fairy tale  (highlight doc. check)

    For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper, click HERE.  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERETo print a copy of reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE.

    Today's Quote of the Day:

    Every man dies.  Not every man really lives.  ~Braveheart
     

    Today's allusion:

    burning bush

    Today's Words of the Day:

    refulgent

    jetty

    petard

    brevity

     

    1. Group Check-in:
      • progress on Lit Theory paper,
      • battle chart columns 2-3 Click HERE for the battle chart
      • Play BNL "Celebrity" song & "You're so Vain"

       

    2. BEOWULF TRANSLATIONS: Show the words in the first 11 lines.  Play lines 1-11 in Old English, read the first 11 in Raffel version, then play the first 11 lines in Heaney.  Swedish version, too.   Check out this cool Beowulf translation website!  http://www.beowulftranslations.net/journey.shtml
    3. BEOWULF:  FIRST WORD ("in medias res"--typical of epics) Look at three translations of the first page and how they differ--the first words (OE—Hwaet , Heany—so, Raffel—hear me, Kennedy—Lo!, Abrams prose—Yes!, Bethel—Listen up, Quiet! others?)
    4. Look at the kennings--nagellacksborttagningsmedel, the caesura, the alliteration
    5. Look at Raffel's translation and how hints of culture, themes, etc., occur in the first page!
    6. Announcement of the theme--"what makes a good king?"  What makes a good life? 
    7. Share WA 19  part 1--make transparencies--AS/MED charts, quotes, heroic ideal, and compare battle charts
    8. Define the AS idea of an EPIC HERO--use the worksheet in the Beowulf packet and chapter from the Norton Anthology on "The Heroic Ideal" maybe: Watch "The Epic Hero" video--take notes!
    9. BEOWULF  Who or what is Grendel--really?  Meet Grendel p. 26 Raffel and p. 9 in the Heany--Listen on tape 
    10. Cain & Abel story If not before, watch Cain and Abel video (22 min.)
    11. Gardner's Grendel "The Nature of Grendel" as a pagan and Christian monster
    12. Play Alex Doud's Beowulf rap and Gilmore Girls season 6 episode 10.
    1. g
    2. Beowulf Battle Chart--c/c column 1--Fight with Grendel Click HERE for the chart
    3. Zemeckis Beowulf--Watch 10 min. of battle with Grendel

     

    Wally and Adv. 12 at the I-Max to see the opening of the Zemecki's Beowulf Movie at Midnight Nov. 2007

    For Roger Ebert's review of the new 3-D Zemeckis Beowulf movie, click here: http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071114/REVIEWS/71115001

    BEOWULF  Who or what is Grendel--really?  Meet Grendel p. 26 Raffel and p. 9 in the Heany--Listen on tape 

      1. Cain & Abel story If not before, watch Cain and Abel video (22 min.)
      2. What is Grendel--really?  Meet Grendel p. 26 Raffel and p. 9 in the Heany--Listen on tape 
      3. BEOWULF BATTLE CHART--Begin to discuss the differences between the first and second battles--venue, use of weapons, etc.  Click HERE for the battle chart
      4. REACTION TO GARDNER'S GRENDEL Gardner's Grendel "The Nature of Grendel" as a pagan and Christian monster , story of Cain and Abel?, Gardner's Grendel:  What did you think of Gardner's Grendel? What might Grendel be symbolic of?  C/C WA  Gardner's Grendel--reaction and the 5 Q's, Gardner's Grendel, share what it was like if you started to read it

      HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

      1. WA 20  Beowulf part 2--2nd side (Quote and Lay)
     
    1. CARPE DIEM! (if you are all caught up, of course!  You can also read Grendel r or even start your Beowulf paper!) P.S. Get psyched for the field trip tomorrow!
    2. DUE MONDAY, November 22nd, read Gardner's Grendel.  For a copy of the "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet," click HERE! As you read, do the following on your own notebook paper (unless you buy your own book--available in the school store--in which case you can do this note-taking right on the covers and extra pages in the book):   1. keep a character list, 2. on the Zodiac Wheel (the second page of the hand-out "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet"), jot down a quick plot synopsis for each chapter.  3. 3 Chapter Analyses Charts on Grendel Worksheet:  Each Beowulf group will be assigned 3 chapters to become experts on.   Here are the assigned chapters:  BEOWULF--chaps. 1-3, GRENDEL--chaps.  4-6, MOMMY--chaps. 7-9, DRAGONS--chaps. 10-12. On the front of the "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet" (click HERE for a copy of this worksheet),  there is a a chart for you to fill out for your group's assigned chapters.  Note that there are only two columns when there should be three.  So, for your 3rd assigned chapter, draw one more column on the back of the first page to put your comments.  4. consult a copy of  a zodiac chart (see HERE for a list of the zodiac signs, or click http://www.psychicguild.com/horoscopes_explained.php or click HERE for the Zodiac wheel in your "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet") and discuss how one of the zodiac signs is present/symbolic in each of the 12 chapters.  5. Also, as you read, jot down a list of your personal questions. NOTE: When you finish the novel, you also will do 3 WA's: (worth 5 journal points each.  You are to choose  3 of the 5 choices "GG" Journal Topics--WA 24, 25, 26.  4 choices are listed on the page 2 of the Beowulf packet.  The 5th topic (not listed on your blue Beowulf packet) is to read the  last blue essay  in the Beowulf packet which addresses Gardner's Grendel and Beowulf's Grendel as both monster and human.  It's really interesting!  Write a page response.  For a copy of the topics, click HERE.
    3. Beowulf paper (due Wednesday, Dec. 1 ) If you want to create your own topic, a proposed thesis and preliminary outline is required by ASAP! Click HERE for a copy of the new 2011 Beowulf paper packet Click HERE for the credentials for the editor/writers of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, vol. 1.  BEOWULF PAPER--the ORDER:  1. outline  2. paper itself  3.  works cited   4.  any supplementary articles/texts (pre-highlighted) which Wally didn't supply  5.  any supplementary articles/texts (no need to pre-highlight) which Wally supplied  6.  security copy (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight on day the paper is due!) Click HERE for the credentials of Donaldson and David who authored the chapter about the heroic ideal from "The Middle Ages" in the Norton Anthology of English Literature (It's the blue chapter copied in your Beowulf packet).

      BEOWULF PAPER DUE Wed., Dec. 1st!

      ORDER:

      1. outline

      2. paper itself

      3.  works cited

      4.  any articles/texts (pre-highlighted)

      5.  security copy  (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight

    4.  

       

       

       

    WEDNESDAY, day 47

    Midsummer Night's Dream Field Trip

               Schedule of Events on

    Wednesday,  November 17th, 2010

                                        8:40     Students arrive and get settled

                                8:40-8:50     Welcome students, explain the day and introduce workshop instructors

                                8:50-8:55     Students move to small group workshop sessions

                    8:55-9:55     Students attend small group workshops of their choice

                  9:55-10:00     Students return to theatre

                10:00-10:30     Students attend Build a Moment in the theatre

                10:35-11:15     Lunch at surrounding cafes

                11:15-11:30     Students seated in reserved seats for performance

                  11:30-2:10     Performance

                    2:15-2:45     Post Show Discussion with  cast member

    Today's Quotes of the Day:

    We have a natural right to make use of our pens as of our tongue, at our peril, risk and hazard.  ~Voltaire, Dictionnaire Philosophique, 1764

     What progress we are making.  In the Middle Ages they would have burned me.  Now they are content with burning my books.  ~Sigmund Freud, 1933

    Today's allusion:

    none

    Today's Words of the Day:

    timorous

    indefatigable

    refulgent

    jetty

     

     

     

     

     

     

    1. Group Check-in:
      • none
    2. Field Trip

     

    HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

    1. nothing

     

     

    1. CARPE DIEM! (if you are all caught up, of course!  You can also read Grendel r or even start your Beowulf paper!) P.S. Get psyched for the field trip tomorrow!
    2. DUE MONDAY, November 22nd, read Gardner's Grendel.  For a copy of the "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet," click HERE! As you read, do the following on your own notebook paper (unless you buy your own book--available in the school store--in which case you can do this note-taking right on the covers and extra pages in the book):   1. keep a character list, 2. on the Zodiac Wheel (the second page of the hand-out "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet"), jot down a quick plot synopsis for each chapter.  3. 3 Chapter Analyses Charts on Grendel Worksheet:  Each Beowulf group will be assigned 3 chapters to become experts on.   Here are the assigned chapters:  BEOWULF--chaps. 1-3, GRENDEL--chaps.  4-6, MOMMY--chaps. 7-9, DRAGONS--chaps. 10-12. On the front of the "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet" (click HERE for a copy of this worksheet),  there is a a chart for you to fill out for your group's assigned chapters.  Note that there are only two columns when there should be three.  So, for your 3rd assigned chapter, draw one more column on the back of the first page to put your comments.  4. consult a copy of  a zodiac chart (see HERE for a list of the zodiac signs, or click http://www.psychicguild.com/horoscopes_explained.php or click HERE for the Zodiac wheel in your "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet") and discuss how one of the zodiac signs is present/symbolic in each of the 12 chapters.  5. Also, as you read, jot down a list of your personal questions. NOTE: When you finish the novel, you also will do 3 WA's: (worth 5 journal points each.  You are to choose  3 of the 5 choices "GG" Journal Topics--WA 24, 25, 26.  4 choices are listed on the page 2 of the Beowulf packet.  The 5th topic (not listed on your blue Beowulf packet) is to read the  last blue essay  in the Beowulf packet which addresses Gardner's Grendel and Beowulf's Grendel as both monster and human.  It's really interesting!  Write a page response.  For a copy of the topics, click HERE.
    3. Beowulf paper (due Wednesday, Dec. 1 ) If you want to create your own topic, a proposed thesis and preliminary outline is required by ASAP! Click HERE for a copy of the new 2011 Beowulf paper packet Click HERE for the credentials for the editor/writers of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, vol. 1.  BEOWULF PAPER--the ORDER:  1. outline  2. paper itself  3.  works cited   4.  any supplementary articles/texts (pre-highlighted) which Wally didn't supply  5.  any supplementary articles/texts (no need to pre-highlight) which Wally supplied  6.  security copy (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight on day the paper is due!) Click HERE for the credentials of Donaldson and David who authored the chapter about the heroic ideal from "The Middle Ages" in the Norton Anthology of English Literature (It's the blue chapter copied in your Beowulf packet).

      BEOWULF PAPER DUE Wed., Dec. 1st!

      ORDER:

      1. outline

      2. paper itself

      3.  works cited

      4.  any articles/texts (pre-highlighted)

      5.  security copy  (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight

    4.  

      Randy Pausch

      Are you a Tigger or an Eyeore?

      CBS announcement of Randy's death

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SwZQlzZRtk&feature=related

      Randy Pausch & Eric Hutchinson music (3 min. 31 sec)

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7O6AWwLyAk&NR

      Wall Street Journal  tribute to Randy Pausch (5:13 min.)

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mIysXLiA5s0&feature=related

      Randy Pausch Carnegie-Mellon grad speech  (6 min)

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RcYv5x6gZTA&NR=1

      Inspirational Speech by Dr. Randy Pausch On the Oprah Winfrey Show: The Last Lecture. Dr. Pausch Passed Away On July 25, 2008  (10 min.)

    5.  

     

     

    THURSDAY, day 48

    Grendel

    Zemeckis' Grendel

      

    Gardner's Grendel

    BEOWULF MEETS GRENDEL'S MOTHER!

    Today's Quotes of the Day:

    O Liberty! how many crimes are committed in thy name! -Jeanne-Marie Roland, revolutionary (1754-1793)

    Heroes are not known by the loftiness of their carriage; the greatest braggarts are generally the merest cowards.
    Jean Jacques Rousseau

    How many famous and high-spirited heroes have lived a day too long?
    Jean Jacques Rousseau

    Man is born free, and everywhere he is in shackles.
    Jean Jacques Rousseau

    I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.  ~Voltaire

    Today's allusion:

    non sequiter

    Today's Words of the Day:

    defile

    inordinate

    panoply

    patriarch

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    1. Group Work
      • Debrief the play from yesterday

         

    2. BEOWULF TRANSLATIONS: Show the words in the first 11 lines.  Play lines 1-11 in Old English, read the first 11 in Raffel version, then play the first 11 lines in Heaney.  Swedish version, too.   Check out this cool Beowulf translation website!  http://www.beowulftranslations.net/journey.shtml
    3. BEOWULF:  FIRST WORD ("in medias res"--typical of epics) Look at three translations of the first page and how they differ--the first words (OE—Hwaet , Heany—so, Raffel—hear me, Kennedy—Lo!, Abrams prose—Yes!, Bethel—Listen up, Quiet! others?)
    4. Look at the kennings--nagellacksborttagningsmedel, the caesura, the alliteration
    5. Look at Raffel's translation and how hints of culture, themes, etc., occur in the first page!

      Announcement of the theme--"what makes a good king?"  What makes a good life? 

       

     

    HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

    1. none

     

    1. Fantastic Heathy Food Friday!

       

    2.  

       BEOWULF ASSIGNMENT E:

      WA 21_   Beowulf  PART THREE (pp. 149-213)  (minimum of 2 sides)

      SIDE 1:

      A.  Now read part three of Beowulf (pp.149-213). 

      After reading, consider the following question: “TO BE MOVED OR NOT—by Beowulf?”

      J. R. R. Tolkien, known to most of you as the author of that fantastical trilogy, The Lord of the Rings, was by training an academician--in fact, a medieval scholar.  In his now famous 1936 essay, "Beowulf:  The Monsters and the Critics," Tolkien writes:

      It [Beowulf] is an heroic-elegiac poem; and in a sense all of its first 3136 lines are a prelude to a dirge [. . . ] one of the most moving ever written.

      Write about this quote in your entry.  What do you imagine he meant by such a statement?  You might begin by considering what it makes it a "heroic" poem.

      What does it show us of the "heroic ideal"?  And what is elegiac about it?  (Be sure to look up “elegiac” and “elegy.”) The phrase "heroic-elegiac" is paradoxical, no?  And there's the idea of a dirge.  (Be sure to look up “dirge.”) How so?

      Finally, where are you on the moving part?  Think about what constitutes "moving" to you.  To others?

      Tolkien actually calls it--yes, the same Beowulf we read--"most moving ever written."  What do you think?  Was Beowulf moving to you?  What would most people find it moving?  Why or why not?

      B. On WA 19 (Beowulf part 1) Complete BATTLE CHART COLUMN 3

      After reading, go back to your part 1 WA .  Now, complete the second column of the BATTLE CHART for the battle with the dragon.

      Beowulf vs. Grendel

      Beowulf vs. Mom

      Beowulf vs. Dragon

      1.  no weapons

      1. etc.

      1. etc.

      SIDE 2:

      C. Beowulf part 3: Quotes 30-51 and LAY

      SIGNIFICANT QUOTE:  Look over quotes 30-51 (or find your own quotes from part 3), and choose the ONE quote that you think is MOST significant for part 3.  Write the quotation in its entirety on your journal entry (along with its page number) and underneath it, comment on  each of the following:

      a.        the quote's context

      b.        its possible meaning and relevance to part 3

      c.        possible larger meaning for us today or you personally

      SIGNIFICANT LAY: Before writing up the significance of the lay, review the lays in part 3: 

      "The Lay of the Last Survivor"  p. 151-155

      "The Lay of Heardred"  pp. 161-163

      "The Lay of the Three Brothers:  Herbald, Hathcyn, Higlac," pp.  163-169

      "The Messenger Lay of Ongentho"   pp. 197-203

      Now focus on the most important lay of all: "The Lay of the Last Survivor"  pp. 151-155

                              Discuss the significance of this lay to Beowulf (the character) or any of the other characters AND/OR to the plot or themes you are seeing surface  in the story.  Why was the lay included?  How necessary is it?

       
    3. DUE MONDAY! +3 point EXTRA CREDIT COUPON--Write a one page (TYPED and DOUBLE-SPACED) letter to Park Square Theatre. Give your thanks or  feedback on your experience or even your ideas on the themes and universal questions or even personal connections to the production of A Midsummer Night's Dream  .  Address the letter to either Mary Finnerty (educational director), or  Jeff Hal-Flavin (director), or to one of the actors (Click http://www.parksquaretheatre.org for a cast list) or to one of the workshop teachers (Rapier = Brian Hessler, Unarmed Stage Combat,  Makeup = Tessie Bundick, Acting Shakespeare = Andrea Wollenberg, Improv = Jen Scott).    Don't forget to keep your ticket to use for a FREE ticket for a future Park Square evening show sometime this year.  Click http://www.parksquaretheatre.org/plays/index.php  for their website to see what's coming up!
    4. Beowulf paper (due Wednesday, Dec. 1 ) If you want to create your own topic, a proposed thesis and preliminary outline is required by ASAP! Click HERE for a copy of the new 2011 Beowulf paper packet Click HERE for the credentials for the editor/writers of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, vol. 1.  BEOWULF PAPER--the ORDER:  1. outline  2. paper itself  3.  works cited   4.  any supplementary articles/texts (pre-highlighted) which Wally didn't supply  5.  any supplementary articles/texts (no need to pre-highlight) which Wally supplied  6.  security copy (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight on day the paper is due!) Click HERE for the credentials of Donaldson and David who authored the chapter about the heroic ideal from "The Middle Ages" in the Norton Anthology of English Literature (It's the blue chapter copied in your Beowulf packet).

      BEOWULF PAPER DUE Wed., Dec. 1st!

      ORDER:

      1. outline

      2. paper itself

      3.  works cited

      4.  any articles/texts (pre-highlighted)

      5.  security copy  (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight

    5.  
    6. DUE NEXT TUESDAY!   Read Gardner's Grendel, do the prep work on the green worksheet, and do a 2 sided journal:  WA 23:Gardner's Grendel--2 topics.  For a copy of the "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet," click HERE! As you read, do the following on your own notebook paper (unless you buy your own book--available in the school store--in which case you can do this note-taking right on the covers and extra pages in the book):  

       1. keep a character list,

      2. on the Zodiac Wheel (the second page of the hand-out "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet"), jot down a quick plot synopsis for each chapter. 

       3. 3 Chapter Analyses Charts on Grendel Worksheet:  Each group will be assigned 2 chapters to become experts on.   Here are the assigned chapters:  GROUP 1--chaps. 1-3, GROUP 2--chaps.  4-6, GROUP 3--chaps. 7-9, GROUP 4--chaps. 10-12. 

      On the front of the "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet" (click HERE for a copy of this worksheet),  there is a a chart for you to fill out for your group's assigned chapters.  

      4. consult a copy of  a zodiac chart (see HERE for a list of the zodiac signs, or click http://www.psychicguild.com/horoscopes_explained.php or click HERE for the Zodiac wheel in your "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet") and discuss how one of the zodiac signs is present/symbolic in each of the 12 chapters.

      5. Also, as you read, jot down a list of your personal questions. NOTE:  When you finish the novel, you also will do WA___: (worth 10 journal points--a 2 sider!).  You are to choose  2 of the 5 choices "GG" Journal Topics.  For a copy of the topics, click HERE.

      John Gardner’s Grendel JOURNAL TOPICS

      GG (Gardner’s Grendel) #1: Personal Response  Patrick Galloway, who has a B.A.in English Literature from San Francisco State University, said, “As much as I enjoyed reading the exploits of the great Geat, I must say that Grendel resonated at a deeper level for me. In the title character's first-person narrative I found a personal corollary: Gardner's Grendel, though man-eating beast, is a thinker, an intellectual trapped (isolated) in a world without peers. As strange as it might sound to say that I identified with a monster, that is exactly how I felt reading this novel. To experience acutely the scorn and/or fear of a world with which one feels no affinity, and yet, at the same time, to perceive the vapidity and obviousness of that world; to feel ostracized by a race of beings whose own fatuity and turpitude makes one ashamed for having relished the thought of acceptance; to be lonely. This, to me, is the crux of the matter regarding Grendel. Loneliness can drive an individual to monstrous extremes. Eating Danes, for instance.”

      What was your personal reaction to reading Grendel?   How did it compare to reading Beowulf?  Comment on Galloway’s quote and how much his reaction to Grendel resonated with your own experience with the novel as well as the idea of being “an intellectual trapped (isolated) in a world without peers.”

      GG (Gardner’s Grendel) #2: Four Characters  Patrick Galloway also states, “The most intriguing aspect of Grendel is the background we receive on primary characters such as Hrothgar, Wealtheow, Unferth, and, of course, Grendel. Gardner, while admittedly taking full advantage of his poetic licence [sic], provides biographical data for each of these individuals which lays a groundwork for subtle, psychological insights into the personalities and actions of each.”  Take these four primary characters, and based on what you already know from reading Beowulf, comment on what it is that Gardner’s Grendel does to enhance, shed deeper insight on, and further develop these characters.

      GG (Gardner’s Grendel) #3: Choose a Topic  Take one of the following topics and trace its presence in Grendel

      • Grendel’s attitude toward language
      • Choose an astrological sign and follow it through its associated chapter.  Look at its relevance and what it comes to signify in Grendel as a whole.
      • Trace Gardner’s use of “cartoon imagery” throughout the novel.  Why is the use of grotesque, exaggerated humor appropriate in the novel?

      NOT AN OPTION!  GG (Gardner’s G Grendel) #4: Extra Credit or Required?  Take up the idea of this being an extra credit option during our study of Beowulf, not a required assignment.  After reading Grendel, thinking about it, and doing a few journals, do you think this should be extra credit or required?  Give a full account as to why it should be required or extra credit.

      GG (Gardner’s Grendel) #5: Humanizing the Monster?  Read Jay Ruud’s article “Gardner’s Grendel and Beowulf:  Humanizing the Monster”--the last green essay in the Beowulf packet which addresses Gardner's Grendel and Beowulf's Grendel as both monster and human.  Jot down some of Ruud’s main points, and write a page response.  

       

     

    FRIDAY, day 49

    BEOWULF vs. the DRAGON!

    Wiglaf is my hero!

    Who is yours?

    Today's Quote of the Day:

    Every man dies.  Not every man really lives.  ~Braveheart
     

    Today's allusion:

    Narcissism/Narcissus

    Today's Words of the Day:

    refulgent

    jetty

    petard

    brevity

     

     "The Last Lecture"

    highlights of "The Last Lecture"  (8:48 min.)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bw3G9_Ysg2E&NR=1

    We don't beat the grim reaper by living longer; we beat the grim reaper by living well.

    1. Group Check-in:
      • plans for the weekend
      • Did Beowulf make it?
       
    2. Group work on part 3 (make transparency) --Beowulf group:  "Moved?"  Grendel:  Quotes   Mommies:  Lay of the Last Survivor  Dragons: battle charts column 3 Click HERE for the battle chart 
    3. BEOWULF TRANSLATIONS: "That was a good king" Listen to Seamus Heaney reading the first 52 lines.   then read last 11 lines to look at how Beowulf ends up.  C/C the two.   Check out this cool Beowulf translation website!  http://www.beowulftranslations.net/journey.shtml
    4. Define the AS idea of an EPIC HERO--use the worksheet in the Beowulf packet and chapter from the Norton Anthology on "The Heroic Ideal" maybe: Watch "The Epic Hero" video--take notes!

    HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

    WA 19 Battle charts

    WA 21 Beowulf part 3

    1. DUE NEXT TUESDAY!   Read Gardner's Grendel, do the prep work on the green worksheet, and do a 2 sided journal:  WA 23:Gardner's Grendel--2 topics.  For a copy of the "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet," click HERE! As you read, do the following on your own notebook paper (unless you buy your own book--available in the school store--in which case you can do this note-taking right on the covers and extra pages in the book):  

       1. keep a character list,

      2. on the Zodiac Wheel (the second page of the hand-out "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet"), jot down a quick plot synopsis for each chapter. 

       3. 3 Chapter Analyses Charts on Grendel Worksheet:  Each group will be assigned 2 chapters to become experts on.   Here are the assigned chapters:  GROUP 1--chaps. 1-3, GROUP 2--chaps.  4-6, GROUP 3--chaps. 7-9, GROUP 4--chaps. 10-12. 

      On the front of the "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet" (click HERE for a copy of this worksheet),  there is a a chart for you to fill out for your group's assigned chapters.  

      4. consult a copy of  a zodiac chart (see HERE for a list of the zodiac signs, or click http://www.psychicguild.com/horoscopes_explained.php or click HERE for the Zodiac wheel in your "Gardner's Grendel Discussion Prep. Worksheet") and discuss how one of the zodiac signs is present/symbolic in each of the 12 chapters.

      5. Also, as you read, jot down a list of your personal questions. NOTE:  When you finish the novel, you also will do WA 23: (worth 10 journal points--a 2 sider!).  You are to choose  2 of the 5 choices "GG" Journal Topics.  For a copy of the topics, click HERE.

      John Gardner’s Grendel JOURNAL TOPICS

      GG (Gardner’s Grendel) #1: Personal Response  Patrick Galloway, who has a B.A.in English Literature from San Francisco State University, said, “As much as I enjoyed reading the exploits of the great Geat, I must say that Grendel resonated at a deeper level for me. In the title character's first-person narrative I found a personal corollary: Gardner's Grendel, though man-eating beast, is a thinker, an intellectual trapped (isolated) in a world without peers. As strange as it might sound to say that I identified with a monster, that is exactly how I felt reading this novel. To experience acutely the scorn and/or fear of a world with which one feels no affinity, and yet, at the same time, to perceive the vapidity and obviousness of that world; to feel ostracized by a race of beings whose own fatuity and turpitude makes one ashamed for having relished the thought of acceptance; to be lonely. This, to me, is the crux of the matter regarding Grendel. Loneliness can drive an individual to monstrous extremes. Eating Danes, for instance.”

      What was your personal reaction to reading Grendel?   How did it compare to reading Beowulf?  Comment on Galloway’s quote and how much his reaction to Grendel resonated with your own experience with the novel as well as the idea of being “an intellectual trapped (isolated) in a world without peers.”

      GG (Gardner’s Grendel) #2: Four Characters  Patrick Galloway also states, “The most intriguing aspect of Grendel is the background we receive on primary characters such as Hrothgar, Wealtheow, Unferth, and, of course, Grendel. Gardner, while admittedly taking full advantage of his poetic licence [sic], provides biographical data for each of these individuals which lays a groundwork for subtle, psychological insights into the personalities and actions of each.”  Take these four primary characters, and based on what you already know from reading Beowulf, comment on what it is that Gardner’s Grendel does to enhance, shed deeper insight on, and further develop these characters.

      GG (Gardner’s Grendel) #3: Choose a Topic  Take one of the following topics and trace its presence in Grendel

      • Grendel’s attitude toward language
      • Choose an astrological sign and follow it through its associated chapter.  Look at its relevance and what it comes to signify in Grendel as a whole.
      • Trace Gardner’s use of “cartoon imagery” throughout the novel.  Why is the use of grotesque, exaggerated humor appropriate in the novel?

      NOT AN OPTION!  GG (Gardner’s G Grendel) #4: Extra Credit or Required?  Take up the idea of this being an extra credit option during our study of Beowulf, not a required assignment.  After reading Grendel, thinking about it, and doing a few journals, do you think this should be extra credit or required?  Give a full account as to why it should be required or extra credit.

      GG (Gardner’s Grendel) #5: Humanizing the Monster?  Read Jay Ruud’s article “Gardner’s Grendel and Beowulf:  Humanizing the Monster”--the last green essay in the Beowulf packet which addresses Gardner's Grendel and Beowulf's Grendel as both monster and human.  Jot down some of Ruud’s main points, and write a page response.  

       

    2. Beowulf paper (due Wednesday, Dec. 1 ) If you want to create your own topic, a proposed thesis and preliminary outline is required by ASAP! Click HERE for a copy of the new 2011 Beowulf paper packet Click HERE for the credentials for the editor/writers of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, vol. 1.  BEOWULF PAPER--the ORDER:  1. outline  2. paper itself  3.  works cited   4.  any supplementary articles/texts (pre-highlighted) which Wally didn't supply  5.  any supplementary articles/texts (no need to pre-highlight) which Wally supplied  6.  security copy (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight on day the paper is due!) Click HERE for the credentials of Donaldson and David who authored the chapter about the heroic ideal from "The Middle Ages" in the Norton Anthology of English Literature (It's the blue chapter copied in your Beowulf packet).

      BEOWULF PAPER DUE Wed., Dec. 1st!

      ORDER:

      1. outline

      2. paper itself

      3.  works cited

      4.  any articles/texts (pre-highlighted)

      5.  security copy  (or e-mailed to lwallenberg@edenpr.org before midnight

    3.  
    4. DUE MONDAY! +3 point EXTRA CREDIT COUPON--Write a one page (TYPED and DOUBLE-SPACED) letter to Park Square Theatre. Give your thanks or  feedback on your experience or even your ideas on the themes and universal questions or even personal connections to the production of A Midsummer Night's Dream .  Address the letter to either Mary Finnerty (educational director), or  Jeff Hal-Flavin (director), or to one of the actors (Click http://www.parksquaretheatre.org for a cast list) or to one of the workshop teachers (Rapier = Brian Hessler), Unarmed Stage Combat, Makeup = Tessie Bundick, Acting Shakespeare = Andrea Wollenberg, Improv = Jen Scott).    Don't forget to keep your ticket to use for a FREE ticket for a future Park Square evening show sometime this year.  Click http://www.parksquaretheatre.org/plays/index.php  for their website to see what's coming up!
    5. BEOWULF EXTRA CREDIT +5 COUPON ASSIGNMENTS  DUE TUESDAY!

      NOTE!  You may do ONE assignments, and you may do this with ONE other person!

      CHOICE 1   Journal Entry: “WANTED”

       

      After reading part 1 in Beowulf, do this entry.  You do not have to do both choice A and B.  Choose the one below in which you are most interested. 

       

      ·          CHOICE A   Write a want ad or write/design a job description poster for the monster-slayer Hrothgar might have advertised for in order to restore peace in his kingdom.

       

      ·          CHOICE B   Design the resume and/or the completed job application that you think Beowulf would have turned in if necessary to do such a job or a job like killing Grendel.

      (HINT!  Quality/creativity are highly encouraged.)

       NOTE   This does not have to be a traditional full-page of writing.  You may choose to illustrate, use graphics, write a poem, song, etc.  This would be a good time to see what your computer can create.

       NOTE   To make sure both choices are covered, be sure to discuss ahead of time who wants to do which choice so your group has at least one of each choice represented.

       

       

      CHOICE 2  Journal Entry: BEOWULF VS. ___________: Another Point of View

       

      Choose  one  of the two first battles and rewrite the battle from either Grendel's point  of view or Grendel's mom's point of view .  Really try to imagine what might be going on inside their heads.  Have fun with this one!  Parody is welcome.  Don't spare the gore! 

       

      ---------> IMPORTANT NOTE:  WRITE THE BATTLE IN FIRST PERSON! 

       

      CHOICE 3   Journal Entry: SOME POETRY CONNECTIONS TO BEOWULF

      1.          Read these poems which can be connected to Beowulf:  Shelley's "Ozymandias" (on p. 638 in our black LBT text), Gray's "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard" (on p. 531--intro; 532-536--poem in our black LBT text), and Wilbur's "Beowulf" (if your teacher gives you a copy of this last one).

      2.          Now respond to the ideas in TWO of these three poems and how each connects to Beowulf and/or Beowulf.

      CHOICE 4  Create The Game of Beowulf       

      Knowing what you know of popular board games  and  the story of Beowulf, create a board game that would re-enact the story's events, characters, and themes.  Actually create the rules, board, playing pieces, etc. YOU MAY COLLABORATE AND PRODUCE THIS GAME WITH ONE OTHER STUDENT IN OUR CLASS IF YOU WANT.

     

             CHOICE 5:  Beowulf Soundtrack  Choose 10 songs and make a play list, CD cover, and explain why you chose each of the songs on the playlist. 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

        EXTRA:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    2009--maybe do the following

    1. WA ___ 4 OTHER TALES: RESPONSE & FIG'S (2 sides total = 10 pts)  Read the 4 other tales the other groups were assigned.  For each tale, devote 1/4 page in which you do the following:  write a quick response and make up 3 FIG questions for each tale.   1 of each level--pink = level 1 factual, blue = level 2 interpretive, gold= level 3 global.   Click HERE to refresh your memory as to how to do FIG Q's.Click HERE for the assigned tales.
    2. WA 37:ASSIGNED TOPIC ON MY GROUP TALE:________  Read the tale your group has been assigned. Click HERE for the assigned tales.  In your minimum of a one page journal entry,  discuss three things:

      First, write a quick response to your tale:  think about your first impressions or reactions or things that make you say "hmmm" or "aha." 

      Second, do the topic  that your group has assigned you. Click HERE for the topics.

      Third, make up a journal topic (this would warrant about ½ page response) for the rest of the class.