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2nd hour 2010 CLASS DISCUSSION GUIDELINES:

FUN

COMMUNICATION

Positive Mental Attitude

ENCOURAGEMENT & SUPPORT

COMMITMENT--involvement & participation

UNITY

 

 

 

 

 Week 9: November 1-5, 2010 HELLO!

To see our latest class pictures, click HERE or

http://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011Adv12ClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIjW1u22xe2A3gE#

History of Eng. Language and preview to

 Beowulf

 

and

Anglo-Saxon Medieval History

and

(Translation:  if you can read this, you must be a Viking!)

 Check out this cool Beowulf translation website!  http://www.beowulftranslations.net/journey.shtml

Click HERE if you need a copy of the buff-colored BEOWULF 2010 packet Click HERE  if you need any hand-outs from the packet (NOTE:  it has the old cover assignment sheet on the top.  Just scroll past those pages to get to the hand-outs you need.)

Got Beowulf?  If you like, get your own copy so you can actively read it!  Get Beowulf from school store--the Seamus Heaney translation (about 15.00 Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders?) or you can buy it USED for a couple of bucks + shipping.  Sweet deal!    Here's the Amazon link:  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0393320979/102-8754601-7566560?v=glance&n=283155&n=507846&s=books&v=glance

Literary Theory Paper

 

To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE.  To print a copy of reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE.  For a copy of a paper by Andy Malone, class of ?, click HERE.

  • SOME LIT THEORY PAPER REMINDERS (rev. 11.11.10):

    1.  NOTE ABOUT THE SOURCES WALLY PROVIDED: the Bressler, Appleman, and Dobie TITLED articles are from books on literary theory.  The TITLED articles by Smith and Murfin appear in the back of either Frankenstein by Mary Shelley or Hamlet by William Shakespeare.  Follow the format in the Survival Manual pp. WC 17-18 for "When you use only a titled chapter or titled article in a book or pamphlet." 

    Mary Shelley's name and William Shakespeare's name will appear on your works-cited page but NOT in any parenthetical references.  By the way, her name is spelled SHELLEY.

    2.  Stories in anthologies are in quotation marks.   ex. "Cinderella"    Stories that are published as books are italicized.   ex.  Cinderella

    3.  For a copy of how the paper should be organized, click HERE.

    4.  If you do the paper with a partner, turn in one copy of the paper, with both names listed in the heading.  For the pagination, type both last names with an "and" in between them.  Turn in one grading sheet, but make sure both of you have put your comments in the comment box.  The paper should be slipped into both folders.

    5.  Here's how you write the following:  PhD or  master's degree or MA.

    6.  Be consistent with capitalization.  Either use "Reader Response" or "reader response."  Pay attention to how your sources capitalize the theories.  Pick a style and be consistent.

    7.  ABOUT HIGHLIGHTING ON PAPER AND SOURCES!  Do not highlight anything in the actual paper.  Photocopy the pages from the sources you have used.  Only highlight what you used in the sources you have borrowed from the bins AND those YOU have located on your own so that I may easily locate the place on the source for the doc. checks.  You do not have to highlight anything from the folk/fairy tales.  If the folk/fair tales are not paginated, please do so in pencil on the pages OR using post-its.

    8.  Make sure you punctuate dialogue and any stage directions correctly.  Make sure you use the Survival Manual pages GRS 11-13 to help you do this.

    9.  Be sure you document the storyline frequently in the section where you are retelling the story.  Unless you have a direct quote, it is best to do it episodically.

    10.  Read the GRADING SHEET carefully,  so you don't miss anything required.  Be sure to establish credibility--both for your narrator as well as the REAL sources you use.

    11.  E-mail or voice mail Wally (952 975-4303) if you have any questions.

    12. The paper must be turned in by 3:00 on the due date or it's late (-10% per day late)!

    13.  Including THOUGHTS can be tricky. The thoughts are indicated in BLUE.

    Example writing the paper in 1st person:

    I walk into the classroom really excited about the hour I am about to spend with the students in Ms. Anderson's Literary Theory 101 class.  I hope they will enjoy hearing about Thumbelina through feminist perspective and maybe will want to take my own online course as a result. 

    I clear my throat and say, "Good morning, class." I wonder if anyone is listening.  I yell, "Hello!  My name is Sara Madison."  They are still talking!  Is there no discipline in the college classrooms today?  I'll try again.  "Quiet!" I screamed. Finally, I get their attention.

    Example writing the paper in 3rd person:

    The professor thought, "I wonder if he is actually going to ask that question."   
     
    Then Professor Madison asked, "How many of you have read the story?"  She speculated that no one had.  Then she added, "Let me phrase it another way, then." She wondered if the hour would ever end and whether teaching was really her calling after all.

    14. NOTE:  Be careful with tense!  Are you going to write the paper as the hour enfolds?  If so, you will be writing primarily in the present tense when it comes to the classroom events.  You can also choose to write the paper as if the event has already transpired; you would be reflecting back on how the events unfolded.  In that case, you would write primarily in the past tense.

    15.  Pay special attention to stories that are "compiled by" or "retold by" or "adapted by."  They require special treatment for works cited and parenthetical documentation. See page WC 12 for how to do a translator, editor, compiler, or adapter.  

    Click  HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)  Also, check out the section WITH EDITOR or TRANSLATOR or COMPILER   in the PDQ section of the Survival Manual.  Click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

EPHS ENGLISH DEPARTMENT SURVIVAL MANUAL  (rev. 11.22.09)

To print off the entire manual half size or full size or to use the manual online in "navigational mode," go to the EPHS English department home page and click on the buttons to the left of the screen:

http://ephs.edenpr.org/index.php?option=com_qcontacts&view=category&catid=76&Itemid=123

click HERE for the COVER with table of contents  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the GRS (Grammar Rules Summary) section--yellow

click HERE for the MSF (Manuscript Formatting Rules) section--yellow

click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) SHORT FORM--pink

Click HERE to check on the current list of JOURNALS.

Buybacks (rev. 2010)!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

 If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.

 (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

 

3rd hour 2010 CLASS DISCUSSION GUIDELINES:

RESPECT

CREATIVITY

FUN

ACCURACY

ORGANIZATION & GOOD PLANNING

OPEN-MINDEDNESS

 

 

 

DATE In-Class plan Homework (due next day almost always):
MONDAY, day 36

Literary Theory

 

NEW BEOWULF GROUPS--Beowulf, Grendel, Mom, Dragon, Hrothgar

Start Anglo-Saxon and Medieval HISTORY and HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

 

 

Click HERE for a copy of the Runic Writing Hand-out!

Today's Quote of the Day:

"I wanted you to see what courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a  man with a gun in his hand.  It's when you know you're licked before you  begin but you begin anyway and see it through no matter what."

from To Kill A Mockingbird  Harper Lee

Today's Quote of the Day:

Dissent is what rescues democracy from a quiet death behind closed doors.

-Lewis H. Lapham, editor (1935- )

Today's allusion:

Svengali

Today's Words of the Day:

ambivalence

anomaly

solecism

stentorian

  1. Group Check-in:
    • Weekend?
    • PICK FROM FATE CAN NEW BEOWULF GROUPS--Beowulf, Grendel, Mom, Dragon, Hrothgar
  2. LIT THEORY finish feminism (read a few pages from "Little Red Riding Hood" in Politically Correct Bedtime Stories, show Tell Me a Story book by Adler, show Bedtime Stories for Grown-ups, Feminist Fairy Tale books, read 1st page of 2 papers), marxism (show video clip of Antz) and/or    Rolf does (or show videotape--10 min.) Marxist "Hansel & Gretel"--demo of lit theory paper) and go over paper requirements at the same time--show outline.  Then do new historicism, deconstruction (read 1st page of Adam Neary's paper), if time, read Ada Alden's column about "Slovenly Peter"   and Lit. Theory quiz
  3. If time, show Rolf's video & samples of Lit Theory Paper-

    HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

    1. WA 16 Modern English Language issues (2 stamps)

     

  1. Assignment  T #1only: DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT AS/MED HISTORY? Take the 50 point salmon Anglo-Saxon and Medieval History pretest! Click HERE if you need a copy of this test. Do not consult any outside sources.  Just do your best.  You will not get points off for wrong answers, but there may be a prize for the best group score!  You will get points for simply doing the test as along as the answers are somewhat plausible.

  2. Assignment  T #2 only:  Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Notes and 5 Q's and A's!  Skim or read closely (depending on your background knowledge) pp. 1-11 and pp. 69-81 in our black LBT text.  Take two sides of a page of notes. (10 pts.) Then write 5 Q's and A's over the material on notebook paper. (worth 5 points--1/2 point per Q and 1/2 point per A).
  3.  Work on your Lit. Theory paper.  Due date Tuesday, Nov. 16th (the day before our first field trip)!   For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper, click HERE.  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE.

  4. Work on your Lit. Theory paper.  Due date on Tuesday, Nov. 16th--the day before our field trip!   For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper, click HERE.  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE.

    ORDER TO TURN IN THE PAPER:

    • everything goes in folder (if partners, put both folders inside each other)
    • grading sheet with comment box filled out
    • the paper
    • works cited
    • source(s) from class used (no need to highlight)
    • allother sources (no need to highlight)
    • the folk/fairy tale (no need to highlight)
    • security copy or e-mail toWally by midnight lwallenberg@edenpr.org

      To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE 

      SOME LIT THEORY PAPER REMINDERS (rev. 11.11.10):

      1.  NOTE ABOUT THE SOURCES WALLY PROVIDED: the Bressler, Appleman, and Dobie TITLED articles are from books on literary theory.  The TITLED articles by Smith and Murfin appear in the back of either Frankenstein by Mary Shelley or Hamlet by William Shakespeare.  Follow the format in the Survival Manual pp. WC 17-18 for "When you use only a titled chapter or titled article in a book or pamphlet." 

      Mary Shelley's name and William Shakespeare's name will appear on your works-cited page but NOT in any parenthetical references.  By the way, her name is spelled SHELLEY.

      2.  Stories in anthologies are in quotation marks.   ex. "Cinderella"    Stories that are published as books are italicized.   ex.  Cinderella

      3.  For a copy of how the paper should be organized, click HERE.

      4.  If you do the paper with a partner, turn in one copy of the paper, with both names listed in the heading.  For the pagination, type both last names with an "and" in between them.  Turn in one grading sheet, but make sure both of you have put your comments in the comment box.  The paper should be slipped into both folders.

      5.  Here's how you write the following:  PhD or  master's degree or MA.

      6.  Be consistent with capitalization.  Either use "Reader Response" or "reader response."  Pay attention to how your sources capitalize the theories.  Pick a style and be consistent.

      7.  ABOUT HIGHLIGHTING ON PAPER AND SOURCES!  Do not highlight anything in the actual paper.  Photocopy the pages from the sources you have used.  Only highlight what you used in the sources you have borrowed from the bins AND those YOU have located on your own so that I may easily locate the place on the source for the doc. checks.  You do not have to highlight anything from the folk/fairy tales.  If the folk/fair tales are not paginated, please do so in pencil on the pages OR using post-its.

      8.  Make sure you punctuate dialogue and any stage directions correctly.  Make sure you use the Survival Manual pages GRS 11-13 to help you do this.

      9.  Be sure you document the storyline frequently in the section where you are retelling the story.  Unless you have a direct quote, it is best to do it episodically.

      10.  Read the GRADING SHEET carefully,  so you don't miss anything required.  Be sure to establish credibility--both for your narrator as well as the REAL sources you use.

      11.  E-mail or voice mail Wally (952 975-4303) if you have any questions.

      12. The paper must be turned in by 3:00 on the due date or it's late (-10% per day late)!

      13.  Including THOUGHTS can be tricky. The thoughts are indicated in BLUE.

      Example writing the paper in 1st person:

      I walk into the classroom really excited about the hour I am about to spend with the students in Ms. Anderson's Literary Theory 101 class.  I hope they will enjoy hearing about Thumbelina through feminist perspective and maybe will want to take my own online course as a result. 

      I clear my throat and say, "Good morning, class." I wonder if anyone is listening.  I yell, "Hello!  My name is Sara Madison."  They are still talking!  Is there no discipline in the college classrooms today?  I'll try again.  "Quiet!" I screamed. Finally, I get their attention.

      Example writing the paper in 3rd person:

      The professor thought, "I wonder if he is actually going to ask that question."   
       
      Then Professor Madison asked, "How many of you have read the story?"  She speculated that no one had.  Then she added, "Let me phrase it another way, then." She wondered if the hour would ever end and whether teaching was really her calling after all.

      14. NOTE:  Be careful with tense!  Are you going to write the paper as the hour enfolds?  If so, you will be writing primarily in the present tense when it comes to the classroom events.  You can also choose to write the paper as if the event has already transpired; you would be reflecting back on how the events unfolded.  In that case, you would write primarily in the past tense.

      15.  Pay special attention to stories that are "compiled by" or "retold by" or "adapted by."  They require special treatment for works cited and parenthetical documentation. See page WC 12 for how to do a translator, editor, compiler, or adapter.  

      Click  HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)  Also, check out the section WITH EDITOR or TRANSLATOR or COMPILER   in the PDQ section of the Survival Manual.  Click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

  5. Buybacks (rev. 2010)!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.

     (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

     

  6. Got Beowulf?  If you like, get your own copy so you can actively read it!  Get Beowulf from school store--the Seamus Heaney translation (about 15.00 Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders?) or you can buy it USED for a couple of bucks + shipping.  Sweet deal!    Here's the Amazon link:  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0393320979/102-8754601-7566560?v=glance&n=283155&n=507846&s=books&v=glance

Stonehenge

  

  

The Swedish version of Stonehenge in Skåne (a.k.a. "Geatland" or "Götaland" in southern Sweden where Beowulf comes from.)

 

TUESDAY, day 37

If time, start Anglo-Saxon and Medieval HISTORY and HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

   

Today's Quotes of the Day:

Ignorance, allied with power, is the most ferocious enemy justice can have.

-James Baldwin, writer (1924-1987)

Dissent is what rescues democracy from a quiet death behind closed doors.

-Lewis H. Lapham, editor (1935- )

Today's allusion:

magnum opus

 

  1. GROUP CHECK IN--Share WA 16--Share your own experiences with learning English, reading, foreign language

     

    1. LIT THEORY finish feminism (read a few pages from "Little Red Riding Hood" in Politically Correct Bedtime Stories, show Tell Me a Story book by Adler, show Bedtime Stories for Grown-ups, Feminist Fairy Tale books, read 1st page of 2 papers), marxism (show video clip of Antz) and/or    Rolf does (or show videotape--10 min.) Marxist "Hansel & Gretel"--demo of lit theory paper) and go over paper requirements at the same time--show outline.  Then do new historicism, deconstruction (read 1st page of Adam Neary's paper), if time, read Ada Alden's column about "Slovenly Peter"   and Lit. Theory quiz
    2. Show Rolf's video & samples of Lit Theory Paper-
    3. Start HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE! --Share WA 16--your own experiences.  Students highlight a few things from your notes on History of Eng. Language notes (assignment V) and share with your group.  Large group: Share most interesting things and "nuts and bolts" material. If you need a copy of the History of the English Language packet, click HERE  or HERE.  Click HERE for a copy of the Runic Writing Hand-out!

      HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

      1. LOTS OF ARTICLES:  all Hist of Eng Lang. articles (blue and green) as well as modern English language articles (yellow and ivory).
      2. stamp Hist of the English Language notes (15 points)--LBT (2 sides) and green/blue articles

 
  1. Assignment  T #1only: DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT AS/MED HISTORY? Take the 50 point salmon Anglo-Saxon and Medieval History pretest! Click HERE if you need a copy of this test. Do not consult any outside sources.  Just do your best.  You will not get points off for wrong answers, but there may be a prize for the best group score!  You will get points for simply doing the test as along as the answers are somewhat plausible.

  2. Assignment  T #2 only:  Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Notes and 5 Q's and A's!  Skim or read closely (depending on your background knowledge) pp. 1-11 and pp. 69-81 in our black LBT text.  Take two sides of a page of notes. (10 pts.) Then write 5 Q's and A's over the material on notebook paper. (worth 5 points--1/2 point per Q and 1/2 point per A).
  3.  Work on your Lit. Theory paper.  Due date Tuesday, Nov. 16th (the day before our first field trip)!   For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper, click HERE.  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE.

  4. Buybacks (rev. 2010)!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.

     (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

     

  5. Got Beowulf?  If you like, get your own copy so you can actively read it!  Get Beowulf from school store--the Seamus Heaney translation (about 15.00 Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders?) or you can buy it USED for a couple of bucks + shipping.  Sweet deal!    Here's the Amazon link:  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0393320979/102-8754601-7566560?v=glance&n=283155&n=507846&s=books&v=glance

 

Carina and Robby summer 2007 in Aarhus, Denmark, at Moesgård Museum,

the museum of the Bog People!  It was sooooooooooo cool! 

  1.   

     

    Click HERE for a copy of the Runic Writing Hand-out!

    a real Rune Stone in southern Sweden (summer 2006)

     

     

     

     

     Carina, Wally, and Robby standing in front of an

    overlook of the Baltic Sea in Geatland

     

     

     

    That's Robby, Carina, and Wally hiding

    behind a real Rune Stone in Geatland

    (where Beowulf actually comes from)!

     

     

     

     

WEDNESDAY, day 38

Modern Issues of the English Language

Wally up at camp on her 25th year celebration and "Linda's Stig,"

 

I am wearing a Swedish folk costume from the village my grandfather Folke came from.           

They honored me by building a path called Lindas stig (Linda's Path)

  

Jag var så glad!!    I was so happy!                            

 

For fun:  Check out the Concordia Language Village Program (CLV) to see how the program works:   http://www.concordialanguagevillages.org/  

Concordia College Language Villages home page

http://www.concordialanguagevillages.org/newsite/

 

Sjölunden Swedish Language Village:

general information about Swedish Village:

http://www.concordialanguagevillages.org/newsite/Languages/swedish1.php

our homepage

You have to pull down menus to see various activities and pictures from the days at camp.

http://sjolunden.villagepages.org/

Here is opening day, for example. 

http://sjolunden.villagepages.org/wb62-wb64-pics/opening-day-19-augusti/

http://sjolunden.villagepages.org/wb82-wb64-pics/2-augusti-opening-day/

the village "virtual tour"

http://sjolunden.villagepages.org/about/virtual-tour/

staff

http://sjolunden.villagepages.org/staff/

 

 

Today's Quote of the Day:

I love being a writer. What I can't stand is the paperwork. -Peter De Vries, editor, novelist (1910-1993)

Today's allusion:

loaves & fishes

 

Today's Words of the Day:

macabre

abysmal

hie

iconoclast

Here's where the expression "to put a lady on a pedestal" came from!

The part under the shoe was called the "pedestal."

  1. Group Check-in:
    • Share 5Q's and A's--a.  Identify the "best  5" (criteria?  bingo?  historically relevant? can you find categories?) and highlight them to be given to another group  What categories did you come up with?  Why study "history" in a lit. class?  (read e-mail) Categories?
    •   Share HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE NOTES   on History of Eng. Language notes (assignment V) and share with your group.  Large group: Share most interesting things and "nuts and bolts" material. If you need a copy of the History of the English Language packet, click HERE  or HERE.  Click HERE for a copy of the Runic Writing Hand-out!
    • Share your History of Anglo-Saxon and Medieval England notes (On a group  transparency, jot down 5 interesting things from your readings on the history of the English language) and 5 Q's and A's--decide on 10 Q's for another group on English history background

     

  2. Explain WA 17 Names
  3.   DEBRIEF WA 16:  Modern English Language Issues--FOLLOW AGENDA!  CLICK HERE! Highlight a few things from your own experiences notes on Modern English Language Issues and share with your group.  Share most interesting things and "nuts and bolts" material.  On a group  transparency, jot down 5 interesting things from your readings on the history of the English language.

    HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

    1. stamp Hist of AS/MED England notes and 5 Q's and A's

    2. salmon AS/MEDHistory pretest

    3. collect articles

    4. post-its

 

PICTURES FROM THE SWEDISH EMBASSY EVENT IN DC LAST WEEK

Click HERE to see some pix and to see all the pix, click on this link:

http://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2010102326SjoWashingtonDC?authkey=Gv1sRgCOrtkbuXre6dZg#

with Ambassador Jonas Hafstrom

with Mrs. Hafstrom

our Sjolunden Swedish staff who attended

Click HERE to see more pictures!

  1. BEOWULF ASSIGNMENT A:THEME JOURNAL #1: WA 17: "What's in a Name?" (1 side min.)

 a   Read through the NAMES PACKET.  Choose a few you feel strongly about.  Think about this concept of names.

Names were a big deal during the Anglo-Saxon times and in Beowulf.  Is this also true still in our society today?    Where did you get your name?  What weight has your name been given through-out your life?  Has your name ever brought you privilege or the cause of a negative situation?  What name would you rather have?  Do you have a nickname?  How/why did that come about?  Will you change your name after marriage?  What do you think of the increasingly popular option of a woman (man?) retaining her (his) childhood family name?  What about double or hyphenated last names?  "What's in a name, anyway?"

 b   Taking into consideration the ideas reflected in the paragraph above, the articles you just read on names, and your own ideas on the topic of names, write at least a one-sided page response for your WA .  Make sure you identify the name of the article you are reacting to before your actual reaction to each specific article.

  If you need a copy of the yellow NAMES PACKET, click HERE and HERE.  

For fun!  Check out this website on names:   www.behindthename.com    Find out why so many women born in the early 1950's are named "Linda."  For more fun!  Find how to write your name in runes  http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/vikings/runesright.html  Click HERE for a copy of the Runic Writing Hand-out!  But wait!  There's more! CELEBRATE YOUR NAME DAY!  In Sweden, you celebrate your birthday and a separate day, called a "namnsdag" or "NAME DAY." (Wally's is June 20th.)  Read more about this:  http://stjarnhimlen.se/ndag/namedays.html    To find what day to celebrate your "NAME DAY," go to http://stjarnhimlen.se/ndag/ndag_alf.html  JUST RELEASED--info on names from the Social Security Office!  Check these out to learn more about names! 

http://www6.comcast.net/articles/news-national/20080510/Baby.Names/print/ 

soc security office   http://www.socialsecurity.gov/ 

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/cgi-bin/popularnames.cgi 

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/pressoffice/pr/baby-names2007-pr.htm 

by year http://www.socialsecurity.gov/cgi-bin/popularnames.cgi

popular names for twins  http://www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/babynames/twins.html 

video on names  http://www.comcast.net/a/

Click HERE to check on the current list of JOURNALS.

Work on your Lit. Theory paper.  Due date on Tuesday, Nov. 16th--the day before our field trip!   For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper, click HERE.  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE.

ORDER TO TURN IN THE PAPER:

  • everything goes in folder (if partners, put both folders inside each other)
  • grading sheet with comment box filled out
  • the paper
  • works cited
  • source(s) from class used (no need to highlight)
  • allother sources (no need to highlight)
  • the folk/fairy tale (no need to highlight)
  • security copy or e-mail toWally by midnight lwallenberg@edenpr.org

    To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE 

    SOME LIT THEORY PAPER REMINDERS (rev. 11.11.10):

    1.  NOTE ABOUT THE SOURCES WALLY PROVIDED: the Bressler, Appleman, and Dobie TITLED articles are from books on literary theory.  The TITLED articles by Smith and Murfin appear in the back of either Frankenstein by Mary Shelley or Hamlet by William Shakespeare.  Follow the format in the Survival Manual pp. WC 17-18 for "When you use only a titled chapter or titled article in a book or pamphlet." 

    Mary Shelley's name and William Shakespeare's name will appear on your works-cited page but NOT in any parenthetical references.  By the way, her name is spelled SHELLEY.

    2.  Stories in anthologies are in quotation marks.   ex. "Cinderella"    Stories that are published as books are italicized.   ex.  Cinderella

    3.  For a copy of how the paper should be organized, click HERE.

    4.  If you do the paper with a partner, turn in one copy of the paper, with both names listed in the heading.  For the pagination, type both last names with an "and" in between them.  Turn in one grading sheet, but make sure both of you have put your comments in the comment box.  The paper should be slipped into both folders.

    5.  Here's how you write the following:  PhD or  master's degree or MA.

    6.  Be consistent with capitalization.  Either use "Reader Response" or "reader response."  Pay attention to how your sources capitalize the theories.  Pick a style and be consistent.

    7.  ABOUT HIGHLIGHTING ON PAPER AND SOURCES!  Do not highlight anything in the actual paper.  Photocopy the pages from the sources you have used.  Only highlight what you used in the sources you have borrowed from the bins AND those YOU have located on your own so that I may easily locate the place on the source for the doc. checks.  You do not have to highlight anything from the folk/fairy tales.  If the folk/fair tales are not paginated, please do so in pencil on the pages OR using post-its.

    8.  Make sure you punctuate dialogue and any stage directions correctly.  Make sure you use the Survival Manual pages GRS 11-13 to help you do this.

    9.  Be sure you document the storyline frequently in the section where you are retelling the story.  Unless you have a direct quote, it is best to do it episodically.

    10.  Read the GRADING SHEET carefully,  so you don't miss anything required.  Be sure to establish credibility--both for your narrator as well as the REAL sources you use.

    11.  E-mail or voice mail Wally (952 975-4303) if you have any questions.

    12. The paper must be turned in by 3:00 on the due date or it's late (-10% per day late)!

    13.  Including THOUGHTS can be tricky. The thoughts are indicated in BLUE.

    Example writing the paper in 1st person:

    I walk into the classroom really excited about the hour I am about to spend with the students in Ms. Anderson's Literary Theory 101 class.  I hope they will enjoy hearing about Thumbelina through feminist perspective and maybe will want to take my own online course as a result. 

    I clear my throat and say, "Good morning, class." I wonder if anyone is listening.  I yell, "Hello!  My name is Sara Madison."  They are still talking!  Is there no discipline in the college classrooms today?  I'll try again.  "Quiet!" I screamed. Finally, I get their attention.

    Example writing the paper in 3rd person:

    The professor thought, "I wonder if he is actually going to ask that question."   
     
    Then Professor Madison asked, "How many of you have read the story?"  She speculated that no one had.  Then she added, "Let me phrase it another way, then." She wondered if the hour would ever end and whether teaching was really her calling after all.

    14. NOTE:  Be careful with tense!  Are you going to write the paper as the hour enfolds?  If so, you will be writing primarily in the present tense when it comes to the classroom events.  You can also choose to write the paper as if the event has already transpired; you would be reflecting back on how the events unfolded.  In that case, you would write primarily in the past tense.

    15.  Pay special attention to stories that are "compiled by" or "retold by" or "adapted by."  They require special treatment for works cited and parenthetical documentation. See page WC 12 for how to do a translator, editor, compiler, or adapter.  

    Click  HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)  Also, check out the section WITH EDITOR or TRANSLATOR or COMPILER   in the PDQ section of the Survival Manual.  Click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

 

 

 

 

 

 

THURSDAY, day 39

Anglo-Saxon and Medieval HISTORY and HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

 

The English Language Tree

    

   

 

 

What's in a name?

Here's the Story of the Day:

Real Name

I can remember walking down the street, saying my name over & over, until all of a sudden, it didn't sound like my name anymore. It didn't even sound like a word at all & then I stopped & the silence rushed in & whispered words that sounded more like my real name & I smiled & thought to myself how surprised my parents would be when they found out what a mistake they had made.

WHEN TO CELEBRATE YOUR NAME DAY!  

In Sweden, you celebrate your birthday and a separate day, called a "namnsdag" or "NAME DAY." Read more about this:  http://stjarnhimlen.se/ndag/namedays.html    To find what day to celebrate your "NAME DAY," go to http://stjarnhimlen.se/ndag/ndag_alf.html 

For fun!  Check out this website on names:         www.behindthename.com

For more fun!  Find how to write your name in runes  http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/vikings/runesright.html

So where did Beowulf's name come from?

  

CHARLIE BETHEL

 Beowulf = Bee-Wolf ( a kenning = BEAR)

Henry Sweet, a philologist and early linguist specializing in Germanic languages, proposed that the name Beowulf literally means in Old English "bee-wolf" or "bee-hunter" and that it is a kenning for "bear".[1] This etymology is mirrored in recorded instances of similar names. Biuuuwulf is recorded as a name in the 1031 AD Liber Vitae. The name is attested to a monk from Durham and literally means bee wolf in Northumbrian.[2] The 11th century English Domesday Book contains a recorded instance of the name Beulf.[2]

Check this out!

 http://www.svenskanamn.se/visa/Beowulf

JUST RELEASED--info on names from the Social Security Office!  Check these out to learn more about names! 

http://www6.comcast.net/articles/news-national/20080510/Baby.Names/print/ 

soc security office   http://www.socialsecurity.gov/ 

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/cgi-bin/popularnames.cgi 

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/pressoffice/pr/baby-names2007-pr.htm 

by year http://www.socialsecurity.gov/cgi-bin/popularnames.cgi

popular names for twins  http://www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/babynames/twins.html 

video on names  http://www.comcast.net/a/

Today's Quotes of the Day:

Testing can show the presence of errors, but not their absence. -Edsger Dijkstra, computer scientist (1930-2002)

All wholesome food is caught without a net or trap. -William Blake, poet, engraver, and painter (1757-1827)

Today's allusion:

Janus

JANUS

Today's Words of the Day:

eschew

accord

complacent

relegate

efficacy

insurgent

Protean

puerile

PACO DOES INTERPRETIVE DANCE TO HONOR BEOWULF!

 

  1. Group Check-in:
    • AS/Medieval History GROUP WORK:  Share 5Q's and A's--a.  Identify the "best 5"  questions (Think about criteria?  bingo?  historically relevant? fulfill's assignment's goal--the "nuts and bolts" of the time period) and highlight them or rewrite the quiz to be given to another group.
    • Write your name in runes on WA Names  Click HERE for a copy of the Runic Writing Hand-out!  Look up the meaning of your name:         www.behindthename.com  sss   How to write your name in runes  http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/vikings/runesright.html
    • C/C salmon pretest on AS/Med times
  2. Explain WA 19 Heroes Journal (15 point journal = 3 sides when done) after reading the required articles in your salmon HEROES packet and another article called "Heroes for Our Age" by Peter Gibbon.  
  3.   FINISH DEBRIEF OF WA 16:  Modern English Language Issues--YELLOW, IVORY, SALMON, PINK PACKETS CLICK HERE! Highlight a few things from your own experiences notes on Modern English Language Issues and share with your group.  Share most interesting things and "nuts and bolts" material.  On a group  transparency, jot down 5 interesting things from your readings on the history of the English language.
  4. IF TIME, Modern English--Marketplace activity--Yes, Mother I have 3 activity, cognates, dialect vs. legitimate language, härma, Folke Hedblom's research, pinka, Chaucer school incidents with language, "w" in Swedish and å, ä, and ö letters. Immersion language teaching?  CLV www.concordialanguagevillages.org
  5. ENGLISH LANGUAGE HISTORY and TREE--Proto-Indo European, Romans, Angles/Saxons/Jutes, Viking invasions, St. Augustine 597, 1066 Norman Conquest (Battle of Hastings)  Days of the week, rune stones  
  6. Discuss POST-ITS on the Tree:  OE-ME-early modern-modern English activity--Use the yellow packet to point out the differences
  7. OE--Listen to tape Show German, French, Swedish Lord's Prayer and discuss RUNES. Maybe how to write your name in runes (use hand-out): http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/vikings/runesright.html

                 OLD ENGLISH WEBSITE:

    http://www.omniglot.com/writing/oldenglish.htm<http://www.omniglot.com/writing/oldenglish.htm

     

  8. Middle English version of prayer, talk middle English influences
  9. Early Modern English--Samuel Johnson's Dictionary. Early Modern English and Shakespeare's impact.  Talk about slurvish.  If time, read "English is a Crazy Language" (assign 5 people to help) and Brian Russell's poem, "The Fall of English" and Swedish idioms.
  10. maybe:  Modern English--Marketplace activity--Yes, Mother I have 3 activity, cognates, dialect vs. legitimate language, härma, Folke Hedblom's research, pinka, Chaucer school incidents with language, "w" in Swedish and å, ä, and ö letters. Immersion language teaching?  CLV www.concordialanguagevillages.org
  11. Debrief AS/Medieval History:  Share 5Q's and A's--a.  Identify the "best 10"  questions (Think about criteria?  bingo?  historically relevant? fulfill's assignment's goal--the "nuts and bolts" of the time period) and highlight them or rewrite the quiz to be given to another group. b.  Why study "history" in a lit. class?  (read e-mail)  c. Write up a list of 5 categories that you think most Q's getting at an era's characteristics would involve--events, people, culture, religion/philosophy?  c. Write Code each question by category looking one more time about each question's relevance. d. Exchange 10 Q's and A's with another group.  e. Take quiz and evaluate the significance of the questions and "grade" how well it did its job--explain!  f. Return quiz to original group's volunteer who for EC will take quiz home and "grade" it and respond to the evaluation then go over it with the group during group check in tomorrow. Maybe show Collins' "The Lanyard" or "Seventh-Grade Viking Warrior"  Taylor Mali

 

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. WA 18 NAMES
  2. 2nd hour:  TONE EXERCIES
 

 

  1. Any leftover Halloween candy?  Bring it in because tomorrow it's FANTASTIC HEALTHY FOOD FRIDAY!  Extra Challenge--bring a treat for your new Beowulf groups which starts with the first letter of your group!  Example:  Mommies-- M & M's,  mangos, melons, mixed nuts, etc.!
  2. BEOWULF ASSIGNMENT B: THEME JOURNAL #2: WA 18: "Heroes" (2 sides min.)

    You will use a packet of articles (as well as one article about a female "hero" and a male "hero") as a basis for this  HEROES JOURNAL ENTRY .   CLICK HERE IF YOU NEED THE HEROES PACKET! Furthermore, one of the most popular topics regarding Beowulf is  the concept of "heroism" and whether Beowulf, the character, measures up to the Anglo-Saxon definition, a modern definition, and, ultimately, your personal definition.  This packet of articles helps tremendously in reviewing the concepts out there in our world today regarding a "MODERN HERO."  So, again, read the articles carefully. 

    For this minimum of 3 sided journal entry, comment on EACH of the following:

    a.     the article entitled "Learning the Power and the Point of Communication" on the reverse side of the salmon cover sheet

    b.     the article in the packet by Paul Levy entitled "What Makes a Hero?"

    c.     the article in the packet from Psychology Today entitled "How to Be Great!" 

    d.     at least ONE other article from this packet (or another cool article you find on your own about a "hero"--be sure to attach a copy of this article to your journal)

    e.     "Heroes for Our Age" by Peter Gibbon

    Taking these articles into consideration and your own ideas about what a hero is, address all or any of the following:  Talk about your own as well as what you think our society's perceptions of a hero are.  In addition, reflect on what you think the early English people thought of when defining a hero.  Think about who your heroes were  (and why) as you were growing up and how those people might have faded from your memory.  What heroes do you have now (or would like to have)?  What heroes would you wish for your children to have?  What heroes do you think they will have (regardless of your input)?

     NOTE  You might even take Professor Chiodo's suggestion (as mentioned in Dale Dauten's article on the reverse side) and turn what you have written into a letter to actually send to your personal "hero" (or someone you admire most if the word "hero" sounds too weird/powerful/trendy.) 

    ☺What better gift to give that special person during your senior year??????  ☺

     

  3.  Work on your Lit. Theory paper.  Due date on November 16!   For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper, click HERE.  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE.

    ORDER TO TURN IN THE PAPER:

    • everything goes in folder (if partners, put both folders inside each other)
    • grading sheet with comment box filled out
    • the paper
    • works cited
    • source(s) from class used (no need to highlight)
    • allother sources (no need to highlight)
    • the folk/fairy tale (no need to highlight)

     

Here's the Story of the Day:

Real Reason

There are things you do because they feel right & they may make no sense & they may make no money & it may be the real reason we are here: to love each other & to eat each other's cooking & say it was good.

Here are pictures from Moesgard Museum; here are some pictures I took of the skeletons and the Bog People from 2,000 years ago!  The Graubelle Man is the oldest preserved body in the world!  Click http://www.moesmus.dk/page.asp?sideid=410&zcs=6  to read more about him and his story.

 http://www.moesmus.dk/default.asp?contentsection=BA1B43EF2CB240209869E8ED2457E4D1&zcs=4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here's the Moesgard Museum's website to check it out: http://www.moesmus.dk/default.asp?contentsection=BA1B43EF2CB240209869E8ED2457E4D1&zcs=4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRIDAY, day 40

Here come the real Vikings!  Skål!!! 

 

 

Just call me, "Beowulf"!

Robby Andrew Wallenberg "Beowulf" Bragg

No!  Just call me "Beowulf"!

Just call me Beowulf!!!

Robby gets to try on real chain mail made by the smith beside him.

Now, he's ready to play Beowulf!

 

Robby and Carina at Warwick Castle summer 2006

Here's the Story of the Day:

Today's Quote of the Day:

The average pencil is seven inches long, with just a half-inch eraser - in case you thought optimism was dead. -Robert Brault, software developer, writer (1972- )

Today's allusion:

in medias res

Today's Words of the Day:

contrition

cursory

fodder

macabre

Our summer of 2006 visit to the Roman city of Bath!

Check out the green water!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Group Check-in:
    • Weekend plans?
    • Cain and Abel story?
    • Put ideas on transparency--Share WA 16 NAMES: how did you get your name?  the real stories about why you were named what you were named, look up names in baby names books and Share WA 17 Heroes
    • Group work on Beowulf part 1:  heroes, names, and individual group assignment.  Click HERE for agenda:  Beowulf, Grendel, Mom, Dragon, Hrothgar

     

  2. week, rune stones  
  3. Discuss POST-ITS on the Tree:  OE-ME-early modern-modern English activity--Use the yellow packet to point out the differences

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

1.  WA 18 Heroes (3 stamps)

2.  History of English Language Notes

CHARLIE BETHEL

 

  1. CC #2 (Class-Connected Journal) (at least one side of a page)   Remember, this is like a PR for Wally, but it doesn't have to be typed--much appreciated if you do, however, hint!--Julian :)--and you will put your name on it.  Remember that you MUST establish a clear Class-Connection in your journal. For directions on how to do a CC journal, go to Assignment H.2.b. in the pink homework packet for a detailed explanation.
  2.  Work on your Lit. Theory paper.  Due date on November 16!   For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper, click HERE.  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERETo print a copy of reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE.

    ORDER TO TURN IN THE PAPER:

    • everything goes in folder (if partners, put both folders inside each other)
    • grading sheet with comment box filled out
    • the paper
    • works cited
    • source(s) from class used (no need to highlight)
    • allother sources (no need to highlight)
    • the folk/fairy tale (no need to highlight)

      SOME LIT THEORY PAPER REMINDERS (rev. 11.11.10):

      1.  NOTE ABOUT THE SOURCES WALLY PROVIDED: the Bressler, Appleman, and Dobie TITLED articles are from books on literary theory.  The TITLED articles by Smith and Murfin appear in the back of either Frankenstein by Mary Shelley or Hamlet by William Shakespeare.  Follow the format in the Survival Manual pp. WC 17-18 for "When you use only a titled chapter or titled article in a book or pamphlet." 

      Mary Shelley's name and William Shakespeare's name will appear on your works-cited page but NOT in any parenthetical references.  By the way, her name is spelled SHELLEY.

      2.  Stories in anthologies are in quotation marks.   ex. "Cinderella"    Stories that are published as books are italicized.   ex.  Cinderella

      3.  For a copy of how the paper should be organized, click HERE.

      4.  If you do the paper with a partner, turn in one copy of the paper, with both names listed in the heading.  For the pagination, type both last names with an "and" in between them.  Turn in one grading sheet, but make sure both of you have put your comments in the comment box.  The paper should be slipped into both folders.

      5.  Here's how you write the following:  PhD or  master's degree or MA.

      6.  Be consistent with capitalization.  Either use "Reader Response" or "reader response."  Pay attention to how your sources capitalize the theories.  Pick a style and be consistent.

      7.  ABOUT HIGHLIGHTING ON PAPER AND SOURCES!  Do not highlight anything in the actual paper.  Photocopy the pages from the sources you have used.  Only highlight what you used in the sources you have borrowed from the bins AND those YOU have located on your own so that I may easily locate the place on the source for the doc. checks.  You do not have to highlight anything from the folk/fairy tales.  If the folk/fair tales are not paginated, please do so in pencil on the pages OR using post-its.

      8.  Make sure you punctuate dialogue and any stage directions correctly.  Make sure you use the Survival Manual pages GRS 11-13 to help you do this.

      9.  Be sure you document the storyline frequently in the section where you are retelling the story.  Unless you have a direct quote, it is best to do it episodically.

      10.  Read the GRADING SHEET carefully,  so you don't miss anything required.  Be sure to establish credibility--both for your narrator as well as the REAL sources you use.

      11.  E-mail or voice mail Wally (952 975-4303) if you have any questions.

      12. The paper must be turned in by 3:00 on the due date or it's late (-10% per day late)!

      13.  Including THOUGHTS can be tricky. The thoughts are indicated in BLUE.

      Example writing the paper in 1st person:

      I walk into the classroom really excited about the hour I am about to spend with the students in Ms. Anderson's Literary Theory 101 class.  I hope they will enjoy hearing about Thumbelina through feminist perspective and maybe will want to take my own online course as a result. 

      I clear my throat and say, "Good morning, class." I wonder if anyone is listening.  I yell, "Hello!  My name is Sara Madison."  They are still talking!  Is there no discipline in the college classrooms today?  I'll try again.  "Quiet!" I screamed. Finally, I get their attention.

      Example writing the paper in 3rd person:

      The professor thought, "I wonder if he is actually going to ask that question."   
       
      Then Professor Madison asked, "How many of you have read the story?"  She speculated that no one had.  Then she added, "Let me phrase it another way, then." She wondered if the hour would ever end and whether teaching was really her calling after all.

      14. NOTE:  Be careful with tense!  Are you going to write the paper as the hour enfolds?  If so, you will be writing primarily in the present tense when it comes to the classroom events.  You can also choose to write the paper as if the event has already transpired; you would be reflecting back on how the events unfolded.  In that case, you would write primarily in the past tense.

      15.  Pay special attention to stories that are "compiled by" or "retold by" or "adapted by."  They require special treatment for works cited and parenthetical documentation. See page WC 12 for how to do a translator, editor, compiler, or adapter.  

      Click  HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)  Also, check out the section WITH EDITOR or TRANSLATOR or COMPILER   in the PDQ section of the Survival Manual.  Click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

  3. Read Beowulf Part 1 (pp. 1-89--only the modern English translation pages, of course!)
  4. WA 19: Beowulf Part 1(minimum of 3 sides)  Click HERE if you need a copy of the buff-colored BEOWULF 2010 assignment sheet.  Click HERE  if you need any hand-outs from the packet (NOTE:  it has the old cover assignment sheet on the top.  Just scroll past those pages to get to the hand-outs you need.)

    SIDE 1:

    1. BACKGROUND NOTES on the Anglo-Saxon Heroic Ideal from blue pages in Beowulf Packet “The Middle Ages” (Norton Anthology)  (1 page minimum)

    SIDE 2:

    1. SET UP A BATTLE CHART LANDSCAPE!—list the key elements of battle #1 with GRENDEL.  Eventually, you will look specifically for comparisons and contrasts between the battles once the second battle and third battle take place.  Some say the battles mirror the three stages of life—adolescence, middle age, and old age.  You will be trying to look for elements of each battle which relate to the stages of life.  Also, you will be looking for elements which characterize Beowulf’s personality as well as Anglo-Saxon values.  ONLY DO THE FIRST COLUMN NOW!

    Beowulf vs. Grendel

    Beowulf vs. Mom

    Beowulf vs. Dragon

     

    1.  no weapons

     

    2.

     

    etc.

     

     

    1.

     

    2.

     

    etc.

     

     

    1.

     

    2.

     

    etc.

     

    SIDE 3:

    Beowulf part 1: Quotes 1 – 19 and LAYS

    1/2 page minimum: SIGNIFICANT QUOTE

     Your first task is also to focus on one significant quote in part 1.

    Look over quotes 1-19 (or find your own quotes from part one), and choose the ONE quote that you think is MOST significant for part one.

    Write the quotation in its entirety on your journal entry (along with its page number) and underneath it, comment on  each of the following:

    a.        the quote's context

    b.        its possible meaning and relevance to part 1

    c.        possible larger meaning for us today or you personally

    1/2 page minimum: SIGNIFICANT LAY:

     Your second  task is also to focus on one lay in part 1.

    Choose one of these three lays:

    "The Lay of Breca" pp.  35-39

    "The Lay of Siegmund and Hermod" pp.  59-61

    "The Lay of Finnsburg"  pp. 71-81

    For the lay you choose, discuss the significance of  the lay to Beowulf (the character) or any of the other characters AND/OR to the plot or themes you are seeing surface  in the story.  Why was the lay included?  How necessary is it? 

      Check out this cool Beowulf translation website!  http://www.beowulftranslations.net/journey.shtml

    HWÆT, WE GAR-DEna in geardagum,

    þeodcyninga þrym gefrunon,

    hu ða æþelingas ellen fremedon!

    oft Scyld Scefing sceaþena þreatum,

    monegum mægþum meodosetla ofteah,

    egsode eorlas, syððanærest wearð

    feasceaft funden; he þæs frofre gebad,

    weox under wolcnum? weorðmyndum þah,

    oð þæt him æghwylc ymbsittendra

    ofer hronrade hyran scolde,

    gomban gyldan; þæt wæs god cyning!

    CHECK OUT SOME BEOWULF WEBSITES RELATED TO TONIGHT'S HW:

     

    How do you see Grendel?

        

 

Beowulf 2007 (by director Roland Zemeckis--due out in theatres Nov. 16, 2007):

http://www.beowulfmovie.com/

http://www.beowulfmovie.com/?gclid=CNHAm8y8k48CFSZ7Igod8xXzJA

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beowulf_(2007_film)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0442933/

Beowulf 2007 (by director Roland Zemeckis--due out in theatres Nov. 16, 2007):

http://www.beowulfmovie.com/

http://www.beowulfmovie.com/?gclid=CNHAm8y8k48CFSZ7Igod8xXzJA

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beowulf_(2007_film)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0442933/

http://www.beowulfmovie.com/

http://www.beowulfmovie.com/?gclid=CNHAm8y8k48CFSZ7Igod8xXzJA

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beowulf_(2007_film)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0442933/

FOR FUN!  Check out more of the the

websites of Beowulf movies (such as Beowulf and Grendel--

filmed in Iceland)

http://www.beowulf-movie.com/

http://movies.monstersandcritics.com/archive/moviearchive.php?item_id=1034&action=images

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0402057/board/nest/14903204

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0402057/combined

http://www.beowulfandgrendel.com/trailer.html

Here's why! Check this one about about no American release :(  Going wild for Gerry: http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&call_pageid=971358637177&c=Article&cid=1144705811820

The new Beowulf movie did great in Canada (see article below).  Grendel eats the box?  Director Sturla Gunnarsson's Canada/U.K./Iceland copro Beowulf & Grendel has easily held the top spot in box office among Canadian films since its release on March 10.   The epic tale about the legendary hero Beowulf (Gerard Butler) and his clash with killer troll Grendel (Ingvar Eggert Sigurosson), did solid business from March 17-26, taking in $155,658 for a total of $346,852. Click here for the full story http://www.playbackmag.com/articles/magazine/20060403/beowulf.html

TO SEE MORE of this BEOWULF MOVIE PHOTOS, CLICK HERE!

 
Birthday Your Star Sign
March 21 - April 19 Aries Aries
April 20 - May 20 Taurus Taurus
May 21 - June 20 Gemini Gemini
June 21 - July 22 Cancer Cancer
July 23 - August 22 Leo Leo
August 23 - September 22 Virgo Virgo
September 23 - October 22 Libra Libra
October 23 - November 21 Scorpio Scorpio
November 22 - December 21 Sagittarius Sagittarius
December 22 - Januray 19 Capricorn Capricorn
January 20 - February 18 Aquarius Aquarius
February 19 - March 20 Pisces Pisces

   
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