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 Week 8: October 25-29, 2010

   HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

     

PUMPKIN GALLERY!

   

   

and

NEW PICTURES!

To see our latest class pictures, click HERE or

http://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011Adv12ClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIjW1u22xe2A3gE#

For a current list of all 2010 journals assigned, click HERE!

 

ONSITE COLLEGE ADMISSIONS DAY!

 

 

Literary Theory & History of the English Language

 

Literary Theory

 

To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE NOTE! For a complete copy of the Lit. Theory Packet (with the paper section at the end), click HERE.

  1. Work on your Lit. Theory paper.  Due date on Tuesday, Nov. 16th--the day before our field trip!   For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper, click HERE.  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE.

    ORDER TO TURN IN THE PAPER:

    • everything goes in folder (if partners, put both folders inside each other)
    • grading sheet with comment box filled out
    • the paper
    • works cited
    • source(s) from class used (no need to highlight)
    • allother sources (no need to highlight)
    • the folk/fairy tale (no need to highlight)
    • security copy or e-mail toWally by midnight lwallenberg@edenpr.org

      To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE 

      SOME LIT THEORY PAPER REMINDERS (rev. 11.11.10):

      1.  NOTE ABOUT THE SOURCES WALLY PROVIDED: the Bressler, Appleman, and Dobie TITLED articles are from books on literary theory.  The TITLED articles by Smith and Murfin appear in the back of either Frankenstein by Mary Shelley or Hamlet by William Shakespeare.  Follow the format in the Survival Manual pp. WC 17-18 for "When you use only a titled chapter or titled article in a book or pamphlet." 

      Mary Shelley's name and William Shakespeare's name will appear on your works-cited page but NOT in any parenthetical references.  By the way, her name is spelled SHELLEY.

      2.  Stories in anthologies are in quotation marks.   ex. "Cinderella"    Stories that are published as books are italicized.   ex.  Cinderella

      3.  For a copy of how the paper should be organized, click HERE.

      4.  If you do the paper with a partner, turn in one copy of the paper, with both names listed in the heading.  For the pagination, type both last names with an "and" in between them.  Turn in one grading sheet, but make sure both of you have put your comments in the comment box.  The paper should be slipped into both folders.

      5.  Here's how you write the following:  PhD or  master's degree or MA.

      6.  Be consistent with capitalization.  Either use "Reader Response" or "reader response."  Pay attention to how your sources capitalize the theories.  Pick a style and be consistent.

      7.  ABOUT HIGHLIGHTING ON PAPER AND SOURCES!  Do not highlight anything in the actual paper.  Photocopy the pages from the sources you have used.  Only highlight what you used in the sources you have borrowed from the bins AND those YOU have located on your own so that I may easily locate the place on the source for the doc. checks.  You do not have to highlight anything from the folk/fairy tales.  If the folk/fair tales are not paginated, please do so in pencil on the pages OR using post-its.

      8.  Make sure you punctuate dialogue and any stage directions correctly.  Make sure you use the Survival Manual pages GRS 11-13 to help you do this.

      9.  Be sure you document the storyline frequently in the section where you are retelling the story.  Unless you have a direct quote, it is best to do it episodically.

      10.  Read the GRADING SHEET carefully,  so you don't miss anything required.  Be sure to establish credibility--both for your narrator as well as the REAL sources you use.

      11.  E-mail or voice mail Wally (952 975-4303) if you have any questions.

      12. The paper must be turned in by 3:00 on the due date or it's late (-10% per day late)!

      13.  Including THOUGHTS can be tricky. The thoughts are indicated in BLUE.

      Example writing the paper in 1st person:

      I walk into the classroom really excited about the hour I am about to spend with the students in Ms. Anderson's Literary Theory 101 class.  I hope they will enjoy hearing about Thumbelina through feminist perspective and maybe will want to take my own online course as a result. 

      I clear my throat and say, "Good morning, class." I wonder if anyone is listening.  I yell, "Hello!  My name is Sara Madison."  They are still talking!  Is there no discipline in the college classrooms today?  I'll try again.  "Quiet!" I screamed. Finally, I get their attention.

      Example writing the paper in 3rd person:

      The professor thought, "I wonder if he is actually going to ask that question."   
       
      Then Professor Madison asked, "How many of you have read the story?"  She speculated that no one had.  Then she added, "Let me phrase it another way, then." She wondered if the hour would ever end and whether teaching was really her calling after all.

      14. NOTE:  Be careful with tense!  Are you going to write the paper as the hour enfolds?  If so, you will be writing primarily in the present tense when it comes to the classroom events.  You can also choose to write the paper as if the event has already transpired; you would be reflecting back on how the events unfolded.  In that case, you would write primarily in the past tense.

      15.  Pay special attention to stories that are "compiled by" or "retold by" or "adapted by."  They require special treatment for works cited and parenthetical documentation. See page WC 12 for how to do a translator, editor, compiler, or adapter.  

      Click  HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)  Also, check out the section WITH EDITOR or TRANSLATOR or COMPILER   in the PDQ section of the Survival Manual.  Click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

 

Wally gets her prince!!

Got Beowulf?  If you like, get your own copy so you can actively read it!  Get Beowulf from school store--the Seamus Heaney translation (about 15.00 Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders?) or you can buy it USED for a couple of bucks + shipping.  Sweet deal!    Here's the Amazon link:  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0393320979/102-8754601-7566560?v=glance&n=283155&n=507846&s=books&v=glance

For the latest in class pictures, click HERE

For a current list of all 2010 journals assigned, click HERE!

Click HERE if you need a copy of the entire blue BEOWULF packet.

To print more allusion and vocab sheets, click HERE!

EPHS ENGLISH DEPARTMENT SURVIVAL MANUAL  (rev. 11.22.09)

To print off the entire manual half size or full size or to use the manual online in "navigational mode," go to the EPHS English department home page and click on the buttons to the left of the screen:

http://ephs.edenpr.org/index.php?option=com_qcontacts&view=category&catid=76&Itemid=123

click HERE for the COVER with table of contents  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the GRS (Grammar Rules Summary) section--yellow

click HERE for the MSF (Manuscript Formatting Rules) section--yellow

click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) SHORT FORM--pink

Buybacks (rev. 2010)!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

 If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.

 (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

 

 

 

DATE In-Class plan Homework (due next day almost always):
MONDAY, day 31

PRESENTATIONS

Freedom Writers

(if time)

Today's Quotes of the Day:

There is no coming to consciousness without pain. -Carl Jung, psychiatrist (1875-1961)

The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails. -William Arthur Ward, college administrator, writer (1921-1994)

 

Today's Allusion of the Day:

none

Today's Words of the Day:

disdain

deign

impromptu

metonymy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Group Check-in:
    • weekend highs and lows
    • share what you know about Imperialism, George Orwell, Kate Mansfield

     

  2. POETRY PRESENTATIONS
     
  3. Watch Freedom Writers (if time)

     

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. none

 

 

  1. DUE WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 27th when Wally returns: Assignment  Q:  WA 14 Active Reading and Two Short Stories (3 parts over two sides = 10 points): A. Read the two articles "How to Read" and "Life in the Margins"  which are included in your new purple Lit. Theory Packet.  To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.   Jot down a response to these articles at the top of your journal.  B. Now read the short story "The Singing Lesson" (in your new purple Lit. Theory Packet) actively.  I suggest reading the whole story first without the active reading and then reading it again WITH active reading.  Click HERE for a copy of the story you can print out or just make your active reading notes on other sheets of paper set beside the text as you read the story.   In your WA 13 write a response to the active reading process AND what you think are the universal questions and ideas in this story.  What did you think of the story and the choices Miss Meadows makes?  B. Finally, read the story "Shooting an Elephant"  (in your new purple Lit. Theory Packet). Do NOT actively read it.  In your WA 13, write a response to NOT actively reading this story AND what you think are the universal questions and ideas in this story. What did you think of the story and the choices the protagonist makes

  2. Got Beowulf?  If you like, get your own copy so you can actively read it!  Get Beowulf from school store--the Seamus Heaney translation (about 15.00 Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders?) or you can buy it USED for a couple of bucks + shipping.  Sweet deal!    Here's the Amazon link:  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0393320979/102-8754601-7566560?v=glance&n=283155&n=507846&s=books&v=glance

     

     

 

TUESDAY, day 32

PRESENTATIONS

Freedom Writers

(if time)

 

Kate Mansfield

    

George Orwell

       

 

Today's allusion:

none

Today's Words of the Day:

adulate

matigate

supercilious

lugubrious

  1. GROUP CHECK-IN:
    • debrief

     

  2. POETRY PRESENTATIONS

     

     

  3. Watch Freedom Writers

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. none

 

 

 

 

  1. Finish WA7  What's My Color? Add the second side (now worth 10 pts.!)!  Write a least a page addressing the following:  1.) how did the poetry project go, 2.) how did your group/our class do during the poetry unit in terms of our class guidelines--grade your group & our class on how well you adhered to the class guidelines! (see below if you've forgotten them)--, 3.) how have your group's dynamics (in light of your "color" gone, and  what more you know now about yourself as a result of working with people who share your color code, and/or 4.) what else you've noticed about the whole color thing since you were first introduced to it. NOTE:  When you are done with this journal, the total req. for WA 6 is (1 side minimum) initial reaction to color tests and (1/2 side min.) reaction to color group

    2nd hour 2010 CLASS DISCUSSION GUIDELINES:

    FUN

    COMMUNICATION

    Positive Mental Attitude

    ENCOURAGEMENT & SUPPORT

    COMMITMENT--involvement & participation

    UNITY

     

    3rd hour 2010 CLASS DISCUSSION GUIDELINES:

    RESPECT

    CREATIVITY

    FUN

    ACCURACY

    ORGANIZATION & GOOD PLANNING

    OPEN-MINDEDNESS

     

     

     

  2. Assignment  R:  Do WA14 (3 parts over 3 sides = 15 pts.) after reading your assigned lit. theory article(s) very carefully.  Here are the three parts:  1. first side:  start by summarizing your assigned theory and its basic tenets (assume it's for someone to understand the theory without reading the articles.   2. 2nd side  Apply the theory to both  "Singing" or "Shooting." Describe what your literary theorist might find of interest/comment on.  3. 3rd side  Finally choose a scene or situation from either the summer novel or the Shakespeare play and describe what your literary theorist might find of interest/comment on. For example, a feminist critic might have a particular interest in the scene where Richard III woos Lady Anne beside her dead husband's coffin.  Think about how a feminist critic might view the actions of Charlotte in Pride & Prejudice.    If you were absent, call someone in your color group or e-mail Wally.  Here are the assigned theories per group:  reader response, feminist (gender) criticism Marxism,  psychoanalytic criticism  If you cannot get in touch with anyone, just choose a theory (see list below) to do the assignment.  To get a copy of the assigned articles, click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.   To print a copy of reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

 

Got Beowulf?  If you like, get your own copy so you can actively read it!  Get Beowulf from school store--the Seamus Heaney translation (about 15.00 Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders?) or you can buy it USED for a couple of bucks + shipping.  Sweet deal!    Here's the Amazon link:  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0393320979/102-8754601-7566560?v=glance&n=283155&n=507846&s=books&v=glance

 

 

WEDNESDAY, day 33

 

Lit Theory Intro

LITERARY THEORY GROUP WORK

 "Singing Lesson" and "Shooting an Elephant"

Kate Mansfield

    

George Orwell

       

 

 

 

 

Today's Quote of the Day:

The courage of the poet is to keep ajar the door that leads into madness.

-Christopher Morley, writer (1890-1957)

Today's Words of the Day:

Today's Words of the Day: click HERE for copy of these definitions.

hermeneutics--the study of the methodological principles of interpretation

part of speech:  noun

adj form:  hermeneutical (interpretative)

adv. form:  hermeneutically

sentence from Bressler article in tonight's reading:  "Put another way, if there is only once correct interpretation of a text, what are the hermeneutical principles readers must use to discover this interpretation?" (p. 3)

trick:  Hermes the Greek god of invention, travel, herald, messenger of the other gods.  He brings the interpretation

etymology:  Greek, early modern English

epistemology--the study, theory or science that investigates the origin, nature and grounds of knowledge especially with reference to its limits and validity

part of speech:  noun

other forms:  epistemological, epistemologically, epistemologist

epistemic--of or relating to knowledge or knowing, cognitive

sentence from Bressler reading:  "Providing the academic arena in which those interested in literary theory (literary theorists) can posit philosophical assumptions concerning the nature of the reading process, the epistemological nature of learning, the nature of reality itself, and a host of related concerns, literary theory offers a variety of methodologies that enable readers to interpret a text from different and often conflicting points of view." (p. 11)

trick:  stem--knowledge is the stem

etymology:  Greek, early Modern English

Today's Quote of the Day:

Criticism, like rain, should be gentle enough to nourish a man's growth without destroying his roots. -Frank A. Clark, writer (1911- )

Today's allusion:

none

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Group Check-in:
    •  "Singing" and "Shooting"
    • share back of WA 7 COLOR & POETRY UNIT DEBRIEFdebrief how your group did on the group guidelines--write up your evaluation of your group (worth one point on final poetry grade

     

  2. Watch Freedom Writers--finish

  3. Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure.  If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK section for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template to do your buybacks, click HERE. rehash CLT and How to do buybacks: If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK section for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template to do your buybacks, click HERE.

  4. Group work on Lit Theory homework  FOR AGENDA--Click HERE. Make transparency with the following:

    1. Bressler article and Appleman article--jot down 1-2 interesting points. 

    2. Discuss the idea of "savoir" vs. "connaitre" reading experiences.  Jot down books you have read that fit into these categories? summer reading connections

    3. hermeneutics--the study of the methodological principles of interpretation  VS.

      epistemology---the study, theory or science that investigates the origin, nature and grounds of knowledge especially with reference to its limits and validity

       

    4. FOR SHORTENED AGENDA ONLY ON THEORY, CLICK HERE: Critical attributes of your group's theory:

    5. Reactions to & Universal Q's in "Singing" and "Shooting"  FIG Q's ideas are also welcome!

    6. Ideas for folk/fairy tales your theorist would enjoy using

     

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. nothing

 

 

 

CARPE DIEM

(thanks to Minne-SNOW-ta weather)!!!!

THURSDAY, day 34

Lit Theory Intro

 

LITERARY THEORY GROUP WORK

 "Singing Lesson" and "Shooting an Elephant"

Today's allusion:

freudian slip

"Freudian slippers"

Today's Quote of the Day:

Ignorance, allied with power, is the most ferocious enemy justice can have.

-James Baldwin, writer (1924-1987)

Today's Words of the Day:

Today's Words of the Day: click HERE for copy of these definitions.

hermeneutics--the study of the methodological principles of interpretation

part of speech:  noun

adj form:  hermeneutical (interpretative)

adv. form:  hermeneutically

sentence from Bressler article:  "Put another way, if there is only once correct interpretation of a text, what are the hermeneutical principles readers must use to discover this interpretation?" (p. 3)

trick:  Hermes the Greek god of invention, travel, herald, messenger of the other gods.  He brings the interpretation

etymology:  Greek, early modern English

epistemology--the study, theory or science that investigates the origin, nature and grounds of knowledge especially with reference to its limits and validity

part of speech:  noun

other forms:  epistemological, epistemologically, epistemologist

 

 

 

 

  1. Group Check-in:
    •  "Singing" and "Shooting"
    • share back of WA 6 COLOR & POETRY UNIT DEBRIEFdebrief how your group did on the group guidelines--write up your evaluation of your group (worth one point on final poetry grade

     

  2. Read poem by Collins' "Marginalia"  Taylor Mali

  3.      Discuss "Singing" and "Shooting"

  4. Discuss Bressler & Appleman articles and the concept of Lit. Theory:   Bressler article and Appleman article--jot down 1-2 interesting points.  Discuss the idea of "savoir" vs. "connaitre" reading experiences.  Jot down books you have read that fit into these categories? summer reading connections

    hermeneutics--the study of the methodological principles of interpretation  VS.

    epistemology---the study, theory or science that investigates the origin, nature and grounds of knowledge especially with reference to its limits and validity

  5. Group work on Lit Theory homework  FOR AGENDA--Click HERE. Make transparency with the following:

    1. Bressler article and Appleman article--jot down 1-2 interesting points. 

    2. Discuss the idea of "savoir" vs. "connaitre" reading experiences.  Jot down books you have read that fit into these categories? summer reading connections

    3. FOR SHORTENED AGENDA ONLY ON THEORY, CLICK HERE: Critical attributes of your group's theory:

    4. Reactions to & Universal Q's in "Singing" and "Shooting"  FIG Q's ideas are also welcome!

    5. Ideas for folk/fairy tales your theorist would enjoy using

     

  6. Share group work on Lit. Theory posters: AGENDA--Click HERE. psychoanalytic (first page of "Singing Lesson" and then read aloud "Breakdown of Family" from Chicken Soup for the Soul, "Little Miss Muffet," read 1st page of 2 papers, and some Freudian slips) or Dr. Suess does Freud "The Cat in the Hat,"http://www.seuss.org/seuss/freud.seuss.html

     feminism (read a few pages from "Little Red Riding Hood" in Politically Correct Bedtime Stories, show Tell Me a Story book by Adler, show Bedtime Stories for Grown-ups, Feminist Fairy Tale books, read 1st page of 2 papers), marxism (show video clip of Antz) and/or    Rolf does (or show videotape--10 min.) Marxist "Hansel & Gretel"--demo of lit theory paper) and go over paper requirements at the same time--show outline.  Then do new historicism, deconstruction (read 1st page of Adam Neary's paper), if time, read Ada Alden's column about "Slovenly Peter"

     

  7. Lit. Theory quiz & show samples of Lit Theory Paper

     

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. stamp WA 14 (10 pts) 3 topics over 2 sides Active Reading concept and "Singing" & "Shooting"
  2. WA 15 (3 sides) = 15 points Theory, application to two stories, and application to Summer Reading  (3 sides = 15 points)
  3. stamp WA 7 stamp back side for 2nd hour & COLLECT
 

 

  1. FANTASTIC HEALTHY FOOD FRIDAY(bring a colorful or Halloween treat!  Blue blueberries, Orange oranges, gold goldfish, green lollipops, etc.) Very soon it's   HALLOWEEN . . .

     so dress up!

     

  2. NEW PICTURES!!!! To see our latest class pictures, click HERE or

    http://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011Adv12ClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIjW1u22xe2A3gE#

        

     

  3. Read carefully through the Lit Theory paper packet. The Lit. Theory paper is due Tuesday, Nov. 16th--the day before our first field trip!   For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper, click HERE.  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE. Start looking for a folk/fairy tale!  Think about whether you want to partner up with someone.   To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE NOTE! For a complete copy of the Lit. Theory Packet (with the paper section at the end), click HERE. 

     

  4. Assignment S:  Read "Unlearning the Myths" and jot down points of interest/reaction in your pink HW packet, p. 32.  If you need a copy of this article (included in the purple Lit. Theory packet), click HERE.
  5. Assignment  U:  WA 16 Modern English Issues (minimum of 2 sides).  You MUST cover TWO areas of discussion: 

     REQUIRED topic 1   talk about your own learning of the English language

    Some ideas:  What do you remember of your parents' earliest English?  (If your native language is not English, you can talk about your native language here.)  What input do your parents or other adults still give you on your spoken language?  What did you realize about your own language once you started learning a second language?  Do you think there is classism in language?  Share what you like.

    REQUIRED topic 2    CLASS ARTICLES: discuss several articles in the colored sets you were given.

      "Take what you like and leave the rest!"  There is a wealth of interesting topics raised in these articles.  Jot choose as many as you want to comment on/explore connections, etc.  Be sure to LABEL THE NAME OF THE ARTICLE ABOVE YOUR RESPONSE so we know to which article you are responding!      If you were absent, just choose either the the yellow or the ivory or the pink or the salmon colored set:   click HERE for the yellow ones or HERE for the ivory ones or HERE for the pink ones or HERE for the salmon ones.

     

    topic 3: OPTIONAL IDEA FOR RESPONSE:   INTERNET ARTICLE:  Check out something else online regarding modern issues of the English language.  There is a wealth of interesting topics raised on these websites/in these articles linked below.  Choose as many as you want to comment on/explore connections, etc.  Be sure to LABEL THE NAME OF THE ARTICLE/SITE ABOVE YOUR RESPONSE and perhaps provide the URL so someone else might look the information up.

    http://craigmod.com/journal/ipad_and_books/

    On e-books and what about the printed word disappearing?

    A Good Mystery: Why We Read

    By MOTOKO RICH

     

    Is Google Making Us Stupid?

    http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200807/google

     

    What if Ebooks Were the Dominant Platform?
    Posted by Mac Slocum

     

    On writing well . . . Great advice from Peter Jacobi

     

    Troubling Case of Readers' Block

    Citing Decline Among Older Kids, NEA Report Warns of Dire Effects

    By Bob Thompson

     

    Twilight of the Books

    What will life be like if people stop reading?

     by Caleb Crain

    BoSacks Asks: What's a Pound of Flesh Worth These Days, Anyway?

    Who Says the Book Business Is Dead?  On E-BOOKS!
    by Peter Osnos

    Here are some more fascinating websites with info/articles to check out:

    http://www.pbs.org/speak/ahead/change/ruining/#

     http://www.pbs.org/speak/ahead/mediapower/vanishing/#

    http://www.pbs.org/speak/ahead/

    http://www.pbs.org/speak/words/sezwho/campustalk/

    http://www.pbs.org/speak/words/sezwho/slang/#

    http://www.pbs.org/speak/words/sezwho/buffy/

    http://www.pbs.org/speak/words/#

    http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20071210/013111.shtml

    http://media.www.redandblack.com/media/storage/paper871/news/2008/01/17/Opinions/Buzz-Words.Ruin.English.Language-3155251.shtml

    http://bosacks.homestead.com/pmg1.html

    http://bosacksarchive.blogspot.com/

    http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs091/1101283694210/archive/1102301906530.html

    IF YOU NEED A BREAK AFTER ALL THIS AWESOME HOMEWORK OR ARE VERY HUNGRY, CHECK OUT AN UNUSUAL PARODY ON YOUTUBE CALLED "BUY, BUY AMERICAN PIE"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vq8wbXAR4ZQ

    Got Beowulf?  If you like, get your own copy so you can actively read it!  Get Beowulf from school store--the Seamus Heaney translation (about 15.00 Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders?) or you can buy it USED for a couple of bucks + shipping.  Sweet deal!    Here's the Amazon link:  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0393320979/102-8754601-7566560?v=glance&n=283155&n=507846&s=books&v=glance

 

FRIDAY, day 35

 

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

 

 

Here's the Story of the Day:

Halloween

I heard that the big kids soaped the windows

 on Halloween & all we had was a box of Tide

 & I couldn't reach the windows anyway,

 so I poured a big pile of it on the neighbor's doorstep

 & I never figured out how my mom knew it was me

until we had kids.

Today's Quotes of the Day:

Ignorance, allied with power, is the most ferocious enemy justice can have.

-James Baldwin, writer (1924-1987)

Dissent is what rescues democracy from a quiet death behind closed doors.

-Lewis H. Lapham, editor (1935- )

Today's allusion:

magnum opus

magnum opus

 

 

Today's allusion:

Emporer's New Clothes

Today's allusion:

 

Today's Words of the Day:

polyphonic

disonant

hiatus

hie

  1. Group Check-in:
    • plans for the weekend
    • "Unlearning the Myths" share points of interest/reaction written in your pink HW packet, p. 32. 
    • "Unlearning the Myths" share points of interest/reaction written in your pink HW packet, p. 32. 
    • understanding of what's required for the  lit. theory paper
    • Lit. Theory quiz & show samples of Lit Theory Paper

     

  2. Go over the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure.  If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK section for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template to do your buybacks, click HERE. rehash CLT and How to do buybacks: If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK section for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template to do your buybacks, click HERE.

  3. 2nd hour: Read poem by Collins' "Marginalia"  Taylor Mali

  4.       2nd hour Discuss "Singing" and "Shooting"

  5. Discuss Bressler & Appleman articles and the concept of Lit. Theory:   Bressler article and Appleman article--jot down 1-2 interesting points.  Discuss the idea of "savoir" vs. "connaitre" reading experiences.  Jot down books you have read that fit into these categories? summer reading connections

  6. Share group work on Lit. Theory posters: AGENDA--Click HERE. psychoanalytic (first page of "Singing Lesson" and then read aloud "Breakdown of Family" from Chicken Soup for the Soul, "Little Miss Muffet," read 1st page of 2 papers, and some Freudian slips) or Dr. Suess does Freud "The Cat in the Hat,"http://www.seuss.org/seuss/freud.seuss.html

     feminism (read a few pages from "Little Red Riding Hood" in Politically Correct Bedtime Stories, show Tell Me a Story book by Adler, show Bedtime Stories for Grown-ups, Feminist Fairy Tale books, read 1st page of 2 papers), marxism (show video clip of Antz) and/or    Rolf does (or show videotape--10 min.) Marxist "Hansel & Gretel"--demo of lit theory paper) and go over paper requirements at the same time--show outline.  Then do new historicism, deconstruction (read 1st page of Adam Neary's paper), if time, read Ada Alden's column about "Slovenly Peter"

     

  7. Lit. Theory quiz & show samples of Lit Theory Paper

  8. If time debrief WA 16--Share your own experiences with learning English, reading, foreign language

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. WA 16 Modern English Language ISSUES  (2 sides minimum)
  1. Assignment  V:  1.) BACKGROUND NOTES ON THE HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE!  Take a minimum of 3 sides of a page of notes (15 HW points total) on what you think is most important and interesting concerning the background of the English Language AS FOLLOWS:  TWO SIDES MINIMUM ON THESE BLACK LBT PAGES (label these carefully in your notes): pp. 64-65; pp. 186-187; pp. 338-339; pp. 428-429; pp. 560-561; pp. 678-679; and pp. 804-805 and 2.) ONE SIDE MINIMUM ON  YOUR ASSIGNED ARTICLES  (blue packets or green packets). If you need copies of the articles, click HERE for the blue ones or HERE for the green ones.  If you were absent, choose any color (blue or green).  

  2. Assignment  V: .  2.) Following the directions for Assignment V #2, do 5 Etymology post-its for your 6 assigned words (choose 5 out of the six)!  Make sure you write each WORD in huge letters in permanent marker on the top front of the post-its and in smaller letters the etymology in pencil on the lower part of the front of each post-it!  For a list of all the assigned words (particularly needed if you were absent today--hint!  you will still need to get post-its to do this), click HERE!  Just choose any 5 words that strike your fancy.  Do ONE post-it per word.  If you don't have post-its, just use index-card sized paper!  Here's a sample of how to do the FRONT side of the post-it:

  3. Begin working on your Lit. Theory paper due Tuesday, Nov. 16th--the day before our first field trip!   For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper, click HERE.  For a copy of the outline of the paper, click HERE To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE NOTE! For a complete copy of the Lit. Theory Packet (with the paper section at the end), click HERE. 

    ORDER TO TURN IN THE PAPER:

    • everything goes in folder (if partners, put both folders inside each other)
    • grading sheet with comment box filled out
    • the paper
    • works cited
    • source(s) from class used (no need to highlight)
    • allother sources (no need to highlight)
    • the folk/fairy tale (no need to highlight)
    • security copy or e-mail toWally by midnight lwallenberg@edenpr.org

      SOME LIT THEORY PAPER REMINDERS (rev. 11.11.10):

      1.  NOTE ABOUT THE SOURCES WALLY PROVIDED: the Bressler, Appleman, and Dobie TITLED articles are from books on literary theory.  The TITLED articles by Smith and Murfin appear in the back of either Frankenstein by Mary Shelley or Hamlet by William Shakespeare.  Follow the format in the Survival Manual pp. WC 17-18 for "When you use only a titled chapter or titled article in a book or pamphlet." 

      Mary Shelley's name and William Shakespeare's name will appear on your works-cited page but NOT in any parenthetical references.  By the way, her name is spelled SHELLEY.

      2.  Stories in anthologies are in quotation marks.   ex. "Cinderella"    Stories that are published as books are italicized.   ex.  Cinderella

      3.  For a copy of how the paper should be organized, click HERE.

      4.  If you do the paper with a partner, turn in one copy of the paper, with both names listed in the heading.  For the pagination, type both last names with an "and" in between them.  Turn in one grading sheet, but make sure both of you have put your comments in the comment box.  The paper should be slipped into both folders.

      5.  Here's how you write the following:  PhD or  master's degree or MA.

      6.  Be consistent with capitalization.  Either use "Reader Response" or "reader response."  Pay attention to how your sources capitalize the theories.  Pick a style and be consistent.

      7.  ABOUT HIGHLIGHTING ON PAPER AND SOURCES!  Do not highlight anything in the actual paper.  Photocopy the pages from the sources you have used.  Only highlight what you used in the sources you have borrowed from the bins AND those YOU have located on your own so that I may easily locate the place on the source for the doc. checks.  You do not have to highlight anything from the folk/fairy tales.  If the folk/fair tales are not paginated, please do so in pencil on the pages OR using post-its.

      8.  Make sure you punctuate dialogue and any stage directions correctly.  Make sure you use the Survival Manual pages GRS 11-13 to help you do this.

      9.  Be sure you document the storyline frequently in the section where you are retelling the story.  Unless you have a direct quote, it is best to do it episodically.

      10.  Read the GRADING SHEET carefully,  so you don't miss anything required.  Be sure to establish credibility--both for your narrator as well as the REAL sources you use.

      11.  E-mail or voice mail Wally (952 975-4303) if you have any questions.

      12. The paper must be turned in by 3:00 on the due date or it's late (-10% per day late)!

      13.  Including THOUGHTS can be tricky. The thoughts are indicated in BLUE.

      Example writing the paper in 1st person:

      I walk into the classroom really excited about the hour I am about to spend with the students in Ms. Anderson's Literary Theory 101 class.  I hope they will enjoy hearing about Thumbelina through feminist perspective and maybe will want to take my own online course as a result. 

      I clear my throat and say, "Good morning, class." I wonder if anyone is listening.  I yell, "Hello!  My name is Sara Madison."  They are still talking!  Is there no discipline in the college classrooms today?  I'll try again.  "Quiet!" I screamed. Finally, I get their attention.

      Example writing the paper in 3rd person:

      The professor thought, "I wonder if he is actually going to ask that question."   
       
      Then Professor Madison asked, "How many of you have read the story?"  She speculated that no one had.  Then she added, "Let me phrase it another way, then." She wondered if the hour would ever end and whether teaching was really her calling after all.

      14. NOTE:  Be careful with tense!  Are you going to write the paper as the hour enfolds?  If so, you will be writing primarily in the present tense when it comes to the classroom events.  You can also choose to write the paper as if the event has already transpired; you would be reflecting back on how the events unfolded.  In that case, you would write primarily in the past tense.

      15.  Pay special attention to stories that are "compiled by" or "retold by" or "adapted by."  They require special treatment for works cited and parenthetical documentation. See page WC 12 for how to do a translator, editor, compiler, or adapter.  

      Click  HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)  Also, check out the section WITH EDITOR or TRANSLATOR or COMPILER   in the PDQ section of the Survival Manual.  Click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

  4. Got Beowulf?  If you like, get your own copy so you can actively read it!  Get Beowulf from school store--the Seamus Heaney translation (about 15.00 Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders?) or you can buy it USED for a couple of bucks + shipping.  Sweet deal!    Here's the Amazon link:  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0393320979/102-8754601-7566560?v=glance&n=283155&n=507846&s=books&v=glance

     

Here are 2  Stories of the Day:

Missing Link II

I thought, I'll remove my head for a while & it went fine except most people didn't know where to look when we were having a conversation.

Extinct

"You don't see stuff like this every day, "she said,

and I said, "Some things go extinct for very good reasons. 

She snorted and said, "I didn't know much about fashion, did I?"

FYI!  Check on your journal organization!  How is your organization and labeling of your journals coming?  Click HERE to print out/see an updated list of all the journals.  You might want to print it out and use it a "table of contents" to be put in the beginning of your journal section.