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 Week 6: October 11-15, 2010

POETRY and PLAN PRESENTATIONS

There's some synchronicity, eh?

   

IT'S AUTUMN!!!

 

To see our latest class pictures, click HERE or

http://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011Adv12ClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIjW1u22xe2A3gE#

For a current list of all journals assigned, click HERE!

To print out a copy of our ADV. 12 POETRY TERMS, click HERE

 For a pdf. copy of the BLUE POETRY PACKET, click HERE!

NOTE! For a complete copy of the Lit. Theory Packet (with the paper section at the end), click HERE.

Buybacks!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  Read the blue BUYBACK section of the Survival Packet CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure.   For a copy of this blue section, click HERE.    If you would like to use a template to do your buybacks, click HERE. (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE.    For a STUDENT'S SAMPLE (not perfect, but close!) of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (pdf.verson) or  HERE (WORD version).

EPHS ENGLISH DEPARTMENT SURVIVAL MANUAL  (rev. 11.22.09)

To print off the entire manual half size or full size or to use the manual online in "navigational mode," go to the EPHS English department home page and click on the buttons to the left of the screen:

http://ephs.edenpr.org/index.php?option=com_qcontacts&view=category&catid=76&Itemid=123

click HERE for the COVER with table of contents  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the GRS (Grammar Rules Summary) section--yellow

click HERE for the MSF (Manuscript Formatting Rules) section--yellow

click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) SHORT FORM--pink

 

 

 
DATE In-Class plan Homework (due next day almost always):
MONDAY, day 23

"A little learning is a dangerous thing" 

 --Alexander Pope

Wally's first AP Class 1977

(do you recognize Mr. McCartan?)

EPHS English Dep't 1985!

 

Today's Quotes of the Day:

When you think of the long and gloomy history of man, you will find more hideous crimes have been committed in the name of obedience than have ever been committed in the name of rebellion. -C.P. Snow, scientist and writer (1905-1980)

It does not require many words to speak the truth. -Chief Joseph, native American leader (1840-1904)

"In the end, it is not the culture from which we came but the one each of us is helping to create that will matter. It is our common fate rather than our disparate pasts that will ultimately describe, redeem, or destroy us." - Sam Smith

 

Today's allusion:

tabula rasa

Today's Words of the Day:

thespian

titanic

invigorate

torpid

  1. Group Check-in:
    • weekend?
    • Go over PINK or GREEN practice SCANSION QUIZ Click here
    • SHAPER--briefly share the jist of the poetry presentation Click HERE or HERE  for a copy of the planning agenda and the gray GROUP POEM PRESENTATION GRADING SHEET.  Click HERE or HERE for just the grading sheet.  ASSIGN group roles (recorder, reporter, analyzer/innovator, harmonizer, gatekeeper, networker) Click HERE) Group Poems--decide on journal entry and order Look over the POETRY PRESENTATION GRADING SHEET.  Jot down any further ideas for any of the Group Poems that come up immediately.
    • on computer in classroom: Write down your assigned literary terminology on master terms sheet and share one of your two poetic terms and/or the poem you wrote about in WA7  CLICK ON STUDENT WORD MASTER  CLICK ON WALLY'S MASTER

      2.     Explain Poetry Project--AGENDA (Click HERE for a copy of the planning agenda) and the gray GROUP POEM PRESENTATION GRADING SHEET (Click HERE for grading sheet)  ASSIGN group roles (recorder, reporter, analyzer/innovator, harmonizer, gatekeeper, networker) Click HERE)

      SLAM POETRY? SLAM POETRY-- Oscar Brown, Jr. "This Beach"

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRFb-D1gYY0&feature=related

      Billy Collins  “Forgetfulness”

      at Dodge Poetry festival 4 min. in:   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Agj5VUiNZA&NR=1

      “Forgetfulness” animated version:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrEPJh14mcU

      “Forgetfulness at Fora TV festival  #28  http://fora.tv/2007/07/04/An_Evening_of_Poetry_with_Billy_Collins

       

      3.     Finish Collins “Introduction to Poetry”  Garrison Keillor reading “Introduction to Poetry”

                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VdAOjATmusc&feature=related

              *maybe do “Advice to Writers” and DVD of Billy Collins' "How to Read a Poem" and

                            opinions on poetry and Collins. 

              4.   Show 2nd Dead Poets clip where Keating has students rip out chapter one  

      5.  POPE ACTIVITY:  Pope quotes--each person gets a slip and needs to find groups of 2 or three.  Discuss the meaning, the connections to writing, and any poetic devices that surface.  SCANSION

       

      POETRY TERMS TODAY:    stanza, enjambment, apostrophe, sonnet, personification, juxtaposition, paradox/oxymoron, voice, repetition, syntax, diction, connotation, denotation, euphemism, perjorative,  DIDLS, simile, metaphor, essay, couplet, quatrain, meter, internal vs. end rhyme, slant rhymecouplet, triplet, quatrain,  octave, tone, imagery, mood, rhythm, synecdoche, metonymy, satire, free verse, rhymed verse, blank verse,  meter, metrical line, prologue, euphony, cacophony, voice, essay, couplet, quatrain, meter, internal vs. end rhyme, schema, ITAD, iambic, trochaic,  pun, couplet, quatrain,   sonnet--2 types: Shakespearean (3 quatrains=abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd   paradox/oxymoron,   free verse, rhymed verse, blank verse, rhythm, meter, metrical line, prologue,  heroic couplet,

      HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

      4 poems project (stamp 25 points)

  1. 3rd HOUR ONLY: Do as much as you can of the PINK Scansion Quiz and the Asimov and the Sonnet Quizzes.  Do these in pencil!  (If you would like to print out a copy of this, click HERE) The following tips/ info should help you.  TO DETERMINE RHYTHM PATTERN: Try  ITAD:  iambic (u/), trochaic (/u), anapestic (uu/), dactylic (/uu), pentameter.   TO DETERMINE RHYME:  You use small letters to designate the rhyming pattern.  For example, use an "a" to designate the last sound at the end of the first line.  Use a "b" to designate a different sound than sound "a."  Use a "c" to designate another different sound than sounds "a" or "b."  Use a "d" to designate another different sound at the end of a line than sounds "a" or "b" or "c," etc.)       

    Example:                                                  

    Small gnats that fly                                                      

    in hot July                                   a                                 

    and lodge in sleeping ears           b                       

    Can rouse therein                      c    

    A trumpet's din                          c                                      

    With Day of Judgment fears.       

    TO FIGURE OUT THE SONNETS ON THE RIGHT COLUMN OF PAGE T 10, YOU NEED TO KNOW THIS:  There are two types of sonnets: Shakespearean (consists of 3 quatrains rhyming like this abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd or? (lots of other options). 

    Click HERE for about 30 sonnets with which to practice.  At the end of the practice sonnets, there's some excellent info. on the sonnet form.   If you would like to read a Shakespearean sonnet every day, click http://www.sonnetaday.com/ for the link.  You can also get a sonnet e-mailed to you every single day by registering at this site!  Ahhh!  Finally, here is an excellent website that gives an overview of the sonnet and all kinds of variations.  Click http://www.sonnets.org/basicforms.htm 

    FOR FUN:  Check out Alan Rickman reading Shakespeare's "Sonnet 130 My Mistress Eyes"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cw6Swr-ME40&mode=related&search=

  2. Read the salmon hand-out today--How to Explicate a Poem (Click HERE), How to Do Scansion (Click HERE), and practice with the scansion exercises on the back side (Click HERE).
  3. Try to apply what you know now about scansion to the Group Poem your group has temporarily chosen for your Poetry Project. Use the salmon hand-out you got today--How to Explicate a Poem (Click HERE), How to Do Scansion (Click HERE), and practice with the scansion exercises on the back side (Click HERE).
  4. Extra Credit! (+5 coupon) MEMORIZE A SONNET! Due Monday, Oct. 18th  If you are interested in getting a Shakespearean sonnet every day in your e-mail, click http://www.sonnetaday.com/

    77 LOVE SONNETS BY GARRISON KEILLOR

    From Garrison Keillor:

    "When I was 16, Helen Fleischman assigned me to memorize Shakespeare’s Sonnet No. 29, "When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state" for English class, and fifty years later, that poem is still in my head. Algebra got washed away, and geometry and most of biology, but those lines about the redemptive power of love in the face of shame are still here behind my eyeballs, more permanent than my own teeth. The sonnet is a durable good. These 77 of mine include sonnets of praise, some erotic, some lamentations, some street sonnets and a 12-sonnet cycle of months. If anything here offends, I beg your pardon, I come in peace, I depart in gratitude."

    http://www.elabs7.com/ct.html?rtr=on&s=fj6,ggr6,dv,m9yp,85wm,iih1,lp0o

    GK reads from 77 Love Sonnets in San Francisco on June 6:

    http://www.elabs7.com/ct.html?rtr=on&s=fj6,ggr6,dv,8l1l,aw78,iih1,lp0o

 

Optional:  We'll be starting Beowulf in 2 weeks.  Get Beowulf from school store--Seamus Heaney translation (or for about $15.00 new or even less used, see Amazon or Barnes & Noble online)  Here's the Amazon link:  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0393320979/102-8754601-7566560?v=glance&n=283155&n=507846&s=books&v=glance 

Barnes & Noble link: http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?userid=fg2YgSNCcb&isbn=0393320979&itm=3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TUESDAY, day 24

BILLY COLLINS, former U.S. Poet Laureate

   

http://www.bigsnap.com/billy.html (former poet laureate Billy Collins' site)    

 www.loc.gov/poetry/180  

http://www.powells.com/authors/collins.html

 

Today's Quote of the Day:

In a completely rational society, the best of us would be teachers and the rest of us would have to settle for something less, because passing civilization along from one generation to the next ought to be the highest honor and the highest responsibility anyone could have. -Lee Iacocca, automobile executive (1924- )

Today's allusion:

Tantalus

tantalize  (TAN-tuh-lyz) verb tr., also tantalise

To tease or torment by showing something desirable but keeping it out of reach. [After Tantalus in Greek mythology. Tantalus, a king of Lydia, was condemned to stand in Hades chin-deep in water and under fruits that receded whenever he tried to drink water or eat the fruit.]

"(JK) Rowling e-mailed Catie back with some tantalizing snippets from her fourth book -- `Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire' -- and then phoned her in Albany, New York to read extracts." "Rowling Read Unfinished Potter Book To Dying Fan," The Times of India (New Delhi, India), Dec 29, 2002.

"Though Law & Order follows a long line of case-solving hits from Dragnet to Columbo, its penchant for real-life cases is its bread and butter. They tantalize with a whiff of familiarity, but often veer off in another direction to surprise viewers -- and to forestall lawsuits." Gary Levin, Plot Ideas Ripped From the Headlines, USA Today, Dec 6, 2002.

 

Today's Words of the Day:

sedentary

sequester

alacrity

maverick

 

 

 

 

  1. Group Check-in:
  • c/c PINK SCANSION QUIZ and do YELLOW ONE
  • check in about HW with poem
  • Share what you know of Great Gatsby and/or F.Scott Fitzgerald
  1. SLAM POETRY?--options:

    Billy Collins  “Forgetfulness”

    at Dodge Poetry festival 4 min. in:   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Agj5VUiNZA&NR=1

    “Forgetfulness” animated version:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrEPJh14mcU

    “Forgetfulness at Fora TV festival  #28  http://fora.tv/2007/07/04/An_Evening_of_Poetry_with_Billy_Collins

    OTHER IDEAS:

    Gina Loring "Somewhere There is a Poem"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PovgQ8jd0Q&feature=related

    Steve Coleman "I want this poem"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3bbpj2hX6w&feature=related

    Eric Darby Scratch & Dent Dreams

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfTa4B7wQ_8

     
  2. POPE ACTIVITY:  Pope quotes--each person gets a slip and needs to find groups of 2 or three.  Discuss the meaning, the connections to writing, and any poetic devices that surface.  FOR SOME HELP, click HERE to read a cool help sheet called "HOW TO EXPLICATE A POEM."
  3. SCANSION REVIEW--Go over PINK and over GREEN practice SCANSION QUIZ  Click here Click HERE for additional scansion exercises with which to practice.  Click HERE for about 30 sonnets with which to practice.  
  4. Characteristics of SONNETS  Look at R&J prologue, My Mistress' Eyes, How do I love thee?, etc. Show examples of Billy Collins' poems:  "Sonnet" and "American Sonnet" and e-mail from Adrienne Clairmont.

    FOR FUN:  Check out Alan Rickman reading Shakespeare's "Sonnet 130 My Mistress Eyes"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cw6Swr-ME40&mode=related&search=

  5. Large group discussion of Pope's poem-"Essay on Criticism"  Click HERE for HOW TO DO SCANSION hand-out. What is scansion? Go over PINK quiz.
  6.  
  7. POETRY TERMS TODAY:    stanza, enjambment, apostrophe, sonnet, personification, juxtaposition, paradox/oxymoron, voice, repetition, syntax, diction, connotation, denotation, euphemism, perjorative,  DIDLS, simile, metaphor, essay, couplet, quatrain, meter, internal vs. end rhyme, slant rhyme,  couplet, triplet, quatrain,  octave, tone, imagery, mood, rhythm, synecdoche, metonymy, satire, free verse, rhymed verse, blank verse,  meter, metrical line, prologue, euphony, cacophony, voice, essay, couplet, quatrain, meter, internal vs. end rhyme, schema, ITAD, iambic, trochaic,  pun, couplet, quatrain,   sonnet--2 types: Shakespearean (3 quatrains=abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd   paradox/oxymoron,   free verse, rhymed verse, blank verse, rhythm, meter, metrical line, prologue,  heroic couplet,

 

Homework collected?

none

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. 2nd HOUR ONLY: Do as much as you can of the PINK Scansion Quiz and the Asimov and the Sonnet Quizzes.  Do these in pencil!  (If you would like to print out a copy of this, click HERE) The following tips/ info should help you.  TO DETERMINE RHYTHM PATTERN: Try  ITAD:  iambic (u/), trochaic (/u), anapestic (uu/), dactylic (/uu), pentameter.   TO DETERMINE RHYME:  You use small letters to designate the rhyming pattern.  For example, use an "a" to designate the last sound at the end of the first line.  Use a "b" to designate a different sound than sound "a."  Use a "c" to designate another different sound than sounds "a" or "b."  Use a "d" to designate another different sound at the end of a line than sounds "a" or "b" or "c," etc.)       

    Example:                                                  

    Small gnats that fly                                                      

    in hot July                                   a                                 

    and lodge in sleeping ears           b                       

    Can rouse therein                      c    

    A trumpet's din                          c                                      

    With Day of Judgment fears.       

    TO FIGURE OUT THE SONNETS ON THE RIGHT COLUMN OF PAGE T 10, YOU NEED TO KNOW THIS:  There are two types of sonnets: Shakespearean (consists of 3 quatrains rhyming like this abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd or? (lots of other options). 

    Click HERE for about 30 sonnets with which to practice.  At the end of the practice sonnets, there's some excellent info. on the sonnet form.   If you would like to read a Shakespearean sonnet every day, click http://www.sonnetaday.com/ for the link.  You can also get a sonnet e-mailed to you every single day by registering at this site!  Ahhh!  Finally, here is an excellent website that gives an overview of the sonnet and all kinds of variations.  Click http://www.sonnets.org/basicforms.htm 

    FOR FUN:  Check out Alan Rickman reading Shakespeare's "Sonnet 130 My Mistress Eyes"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cw6Swr-ME40&mode=related&search=

    2nd HOUR ONLY: Read the salmon hand-out today--How to Explicate a Poem (Click HERE), How to Do Scansion (Click HERE), and practice with the scansion exercises on the back side (Click HERE).

    2nd HOUR ONLY: Try to apply what you know now about scansion to the Group Poem your group has temporarily chosen for your Poetry Project. Use the salmon hand-out you got today--How to Explicate a Poem (Click HERE), How to Do Scansion (Click HERE), and practice with the scansion exercises on the back side (Click HERE).

    Extra Credit! (+5 coupon) MEMORIZE A SONNET! Due Monday, Oct. 18th  If you are interested in getting a Shakespearean sonnet every day in your e-mail, click http://www.sonnetaday.com/

    77 LOVE SONNETS BY GARRISON KEILLOR

    From Garrison Keillor:

    "When I was 16, Helen Fleischman assigned me to memorize Shakespeare’s Sonnet No. 29, "When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state" for English class, and fifty years later, that poem is still in my head. Algebra got washed away, and geometry and most of biology, but those lines about the redemptive power of love in the face of shame are still here behind my eyeballs, more permanent than my own teeth. The sonnet is a durable good. These 77 of mine include sonnets of praise, some erotic, some lamentations, some street sonnets and a 12-sonnet cycle of months. If anything here offends, I beg your pardon, I come in peace, I depart in gratitude."

    http://www.elabs7.com/ct.html?rtr=on&s=fj6,ggr6,dv,m9yp,85wm,iih1,lp0o

    GK reads from 77 Love Sonnets in San Francisco on June 6:

    http://www.elabs7.com/ct.html?rtr=on&s=fj6,ggr6,dv,8l1l,aw78,iih1,lp0o

    Check it out! WALLY'S  COOL POETRY LINKS!

    BBC POETRY SEASON

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/poetryseason/

    BBC TOP BRITISH POETS 2010 VOTE RESULTS

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/poetryseason/vote_results.shtml

    Benjamin Zephaniah 3rd place

    http://www.benjaminzephaniah.com/content/304.php

    BOWERY POETRY CLUB NYC

    http://www.bowerypoetry.com/

    Auden reading "Musee"--poetry animations but his real voice

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZqftCZD2NI&feature=related

    Yeats reading "Innisfree"--poetry animations but his real voice

    http://www.youtube.com/user/poetryanimations#p/u/424/_Xty-kkMmKU

    Stevie Smith reading "Not Waving"--poetry animations but her real voice

    http://www.youtube.com/user/poetryanimations#p/u/451/s8KIr98WDtc

    Big Country performing their "Not Waving but Drowning"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1_qqjJXBEc

    Do not go gentle--Dylan Thomas reading to art images

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ygvTW-6dH8g&feature=related

    another option Dylan Thomas

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E9Y9oKuCdbQ&feature=fvw

    Rodney Dangerfield in Back to School reading Dylan Thomas' "Do not go gentle"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTv1Dmu5CYc&feature=related

    Gina Loring "Somewhere There is a Poem"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PovgQ8jd0Q&feature=related

     
  2. Extra Credit! (+5 coupon) MEMORIZE A SONNET! Due Monday, Oct. 18th  If you are interested in getting a Shakespearean sonnet every day in your e-mail, click http://www.sonnetaday.com/

     

    77 LOVE SONNETS BY GARRISON KEILLOR

    From Garrison Keillor:

    "When I was 16, Helen Fleischman assigned me to memorize Shakespeare’s Sonnet No. 29, "When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state" for English class, and fifty years later, that poem is still in my head. Algebra got washed away, and geometry and most of biology, but those lines about the redemptive power of love in the face of shame are still here behind my eyeballs, more permanent than my own teeth. The sonnet is a durable good. These 77 of mine include sonnets of praise, some erotic, some lamentations, some street sonnets and a 12-sonnet cycle of months. If anything here offends, I beg your pardon, I come in peace, I depart in gratitude."

    http://www.elabs7.com/ct.html?rtr=on&s=fj6,ggr6,dv,m9yp,85wm,iih1,lp0o

    GK reads from 77 Love Sonnets in San Francisco on June 6:

    http://www.elabs7.com/ct.html?rtr=on&s=fj6,ggr6,dv,8l1l,aw78,iih1,lp0o

    Optional:  Get Beowulf from school store Seamus Heaney translation (about 15.00 Amazon, Barnes & Noble)  Here's the Amazon link:  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0393320979/102-8754601-7566560?v=glance&n=283155&n=507846&s=books&v=glance 

    Barnes & Noble link: http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?userid=fg2YgSNCcb&isbn=0393320979&itm=3

 

The Rainy Day

by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.      

The day is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
The vine still clings to the moldering wall,
But at every gust the dead leaves fall,
And the day is dark and dreary.

My life is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
My thoughts still cling to the moldering Past,
But the hopes of youth fall thick in the blast
And the days are dark and dreary.

Be still, sad heart! and cease repining;
Behind the clouds is the sun still shining;
Thy fate is the common fate of all,
Into each life some rain must fall,
Some days must be dark and dreary.


Did you like this poem? Why not receive free classic poems by email? SUBSCRIBE

 

WEDNESDAY, day 25

Special Schedule:

Testing and lunch for PLAN and PSAT students   

7:55 – 11:30

1st Period                     11:40 - 12:19 

2nd Period                   12:27 - 1:06  

3rd Period                   1:14 - 1:53  

4th Period                   2:01 - 2:40

W.H. AUDEN

 CLICK HERE FOR A COPY OF "MUSEE"

slide show of Brueghel's paintings

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbY5GsAnp_A

Check out this website!  These "Auden groupies" (Virtual Street Band) like to make up songs and cartoons to Auden's work:
This Virtual Street Band (which only exists and performs in cyberspace) has put 3 poems of Auden to music and made some flash videoclips to go along with them. Checking this site out is totally recommended, the site has a really cool feel to it, and the clips are awesome. Here's the link:
http://www.virtualstreetband.com

Another cool Auden poem is "Funeral Blues" or "Stop All the Clocks."  Here are some cool links to read and view some youtube stuff regarding this awesome poem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9LJ9we02Ls

reading of the poem from the film Four Weddings and a Funeral

Another reading of the poem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcAYsJo3-uM&mode=related&search=

"Funeral Blues" to music James Horner

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HqZZXuIiJEY

Today's allusion:

Sound & fury

Waterloo

Today's Words of the Day:

scullion

schism

betimes

acquit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Group check-in:
    • How did you carpe your morning?
    •  

     

  2. SLAM POETRY?--options:

    OTHER IDEAS:

    Gina Loring "Somewhere There is a Poem"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PovgQ8jd0Q&feature=related

    Steve Coleman "I want this poem"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3bbpj2hX6w&feature=related

    Eric Darby Scratch & Dent Dreams

     

  3. 2nd hour:  finish large group discussion of Pope's poem-"Essay on Criticism"  Click HERE for HOW TO DO SCANSION hand-out. What is scansion? Go over PINK quiz.
  4. 2nd hour:  SCANSION REVIEW--Go over PINK and over GREEN practice SCANSION QUIZ  Click here Click HERE for additional scansion exercises with which to practice.  Click HERE for about 30 sonnets with which to practice.  
  5. Read "Musee" aloud and groups look for DIDLS:  tone, diction, imagery, syntax, etc. in "Musee des Beaux Arts"  CLICK HERE FOR A COPY OF "MUSEE"
  6. Discuss  "Musee"--Gut reaction--is "Musee" an optimistic or a pessimistic poem.  What are the universal questions?  Why did I have you read "Meditation l7"?  What connections are there?  Click HERE for MUSEE section of poetry packet. 
  7.   IF TIME, More on "Musee"

    a.  SHARE SOMETHING FROM THE BAACK OF YOUR WA9--MORE ON AUDEN--something from page OP 20-24; OP 26-29 AND what you each thought about one of the "Musee" reviews, and Brian Russell's e-mail. 

    b.  Leftovers from "Musee"-What are the universal questions

    c.  Why did I have you read "Meditation l7"?  What connections are there?

    d.  Read NY Times article "The Way We Were" and discuss how the poem is effectively used--the ploughman, where the last sentence uses word "signifying" (allusion),

    e.  Show Billy Collins parody on "Musee"   

    f. read Macbeth's speech "To-morrow and to-morrow"

    g. Read "Out, Out" again as groups look for tone, DIDLS.  Maybe view video.   Favorite Poem project  "Out, out"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1V07Hu5d_Dg&feature=user

    h.  Discuss Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

     If you would like to read Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery," you can get a copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

    i.   Brian Russell's e-mail. 

    j.  Show Auden "reading" "Musee":

    Auden reading "Musee"--poetry animations but his real voice

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZqftCZD2NI&feature=related

     
  8. POETRY TERMS TODAY:    stanza, enjambment, apostrophe, sonnet, personification, juxtaposition, paradox/oxymoron, voice, repetition, syntax, diction, connotation, denotation, euphemism, perjorative,  DIDLS, simile, metaphor, essay, couplet, quatrain, meter, internal vs. end rhyme, slant rhyme couplet, triplet, quatrain,  octave, tone, imagery, mood, rhythm, synecdoche, metonymy, satire, free verse, rhymed verse, blank verse,  meter, metrical line, prologue, euphony, cacophony, voice, essay, couplet, quatrain, meter, internal vs. end rhyme, schema, ITAD, iambic, trochaic,  pun, couplet, quatrain,   sonnet--2 types: Shakespearean (3 quatrains=abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd   paradox/oxymoron,   free verse, rhymed verse, blank verse, rhythm, meter, metrical line, prologue,  heroic couplet,

    HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

    1. tone & mood activities
 

 

  1. TONE MULTIPLE CHOICE EXERCISE: Use the ivory-colored hand-out you got in class today--the last two pages!  Click HERE to print out a copy of this exercise.  Read each passage and choose the word that best describes the tone. As you read, underline what parts of the passage made you arrive at your answer.  Click HERE for a sheet on more specific tone words. You may have to look up some words (i.e., simpering, bantering, pedantic, disdainful, sardonic?)

  2. PROSE WORK WITH TONE & DICTION: #1  WORK WITH CHAPTER 3 in THE GREAT GATSBY:

    Explore Imagery and Tone in chapter 3 of The Great Gatsby  In your poetry packet, there is

  3. an excerpt (page E8-9) from chapter 3 of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby.   CLICK HERE  FOR THE GATSBY, THE STRANGER, AND ANOTHER FUN ASIMOV EXERCISE FROM THE POETRY PACKET AND SCROLL DOWN IF YOU WANT TO PRINT OUT A COPY OF THE PASSAGE SO YOU DON'T HAVE TO DO THE NOTES ON A SEPARATE SHEET OF PAPER (a GREAT idea).  Read the entire excerpt first.  As you read the excerpt quickly through, think about the mood (your emotional response) and the TONE (the author's attitude towards the topic/subject matter, the scene (the people, the atmosphere, etc.).  Jot down YOUR PERSONAL immediate response to TONE--positive, negative, neutral, indifferent?  Write that down on a sheet of paper called GATSBY NOTES.  Now it 's time to go back and justify/confirm your initial response.   On your GATSBY NOTES SHEET right under your projected TONE response, MAKE 5 columns--one column each for DIDLS (Diction, Imagery, Details, Language, Syntax ).  These are the poetic techniques Fitzgerald uses to establish his TONE.  Go back and read the excerpt again SLOWLY.  Concentrate on evidence for each of the DIDLS.  For DICTION, look for interesting/unusual/powerful word choices.  JOT down some of those in the DICTION column and what they connote.  Now, especially concentrate on the images Fitzgerald uses to create a picture in the reader's mind of the scene.  Look for sensory images in particular.  In the IMAGERY COLUMN, jot what you would consider the most effective images.  Now, go back once again and concentrate on the other DIDLS and do the same thing.   When you are done with this, go to pages E1, E3, E4 in the Poetry packet and look at the words to describe tone.  Look for around 5 words from these pages (or of your own choice) which best describe the TONE of this passage.  Write them down right by your original evaluation of TONE.  Do these words fit what you thought from the outset--positive, negative, neutral, indifferent?

    # 2.  Now, read the Camus passage ( from The Stranger) on page E6 of the Poetry packet.  Do the same thing as you did with the Gatsby excerpt.  If you would like a copy of this passage to print out and mark up, click HERE.

Optional:  We'll be starting Beowulf in 2 weeks.  Get Beowulf from school store (4.50--Burton Raffel translation) or Seamus Heaney translation (about 15.00 Amazon, Barnes & Noble)  Here's the Amazon link:  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0393320979/102-8754601-7566560?v=glance&n=283155&n=507846&s=books&v=glance 

Barnes & Noble link: http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?userid=fg2YgSNCcb&isbn=0393320979&itm=3

Check it out! WALLY'S  COOL POETRY LINKS!

NEW LINKS 2010!

BBC POETRY SEASON

http://www.bbc.co.uk/poetryseason/

BBC TOP BRITISH POETS 2010 VOTE RESULTS

http://www.bbc.co.uk/poetryseason/vote_results.shtml

Benjamin Zephaniah 3rd place

http://www.benjaminzephaniah.com/content/304.php

BOWERY POETRY CLUB NYC

http://www.bowerypoetry.com/

Auden reading "Musee"--poetry animations but his real voice

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZqftCZD2NI&feature=related

Yeats reading "Innisfree"--poetry animations but his real voice

http://www.youtube.com/user/poetryanimations#p/u/424/_Xty-kkMmKU

Stevie Smith reading "Not Waving"--poetry animations but her real voice

http://www.youtube.com/user/poetryanimations#p/u/451/s8KIr98WDtc

Big Country performing their "Not Waving but Drowning"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1_qqjJXBEc

Do not go gentle--Dylan Thomas reading to art images

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ygvTW-6dH8g&feature=related

another option Dylan Thomas

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E9Y9oKuCdbQ&feature=fvw

Rodney Dangerfield in Back to School reading Dylan Thomas' "Do not go gentle"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTv1Dmu5CYc&feature=related

Gina Loring "Somewhere There is a Poem"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PovgQ8jd0Q&feature=related

 

THURSDAY  day 26

Wally in NYC at the Metropolitan Museum of Art with an original Pieter Bruegel painting--"The Harvesters" 

Bruegel also painted "The Fall of Icarus"

Today's Quote of the Day:

From my close observation of writers... they fall into two groups: those who bleed copiously and visibly at any bad review, and those who bleed copiously and secretly at any bad review. -Isaac Asimov, scientist and writer (1920-1992)

Dissent is what rescues democracy from a quiet death behind closed doors.

-Lewis H. Lapham, editor (1935- )

Today's allusion:

Waterloo

Today's Words of the Day:

scullion

schism

betimes

acquit

Serendipity Cafe in NYC

with their world famous frozen hot chocolate ice cream sundae

MUSE!

 

 

 

 

  1. Group check-in:
    • group leaders:  assign GROUP ROLES and who should research what

     

  2. SLAM POETRY?--options:

    OTHER IDEAS:

    Gina Loring "Somewhere There is a Poem"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PovgQ8jd0Q&feature=related

    Steve Coleman "I want this poem"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3bbpj2hX6w&feature=related

    Eric Darby Scratch & Dent Dreams

     

  3. INTRO "It's A Woman's World"--Read "It's a Woman's World" aloud. TONE WORDS?  evidence? Explain AP essay procedures; Go over rubric for scoring the AP Essays.  For a copy of the essays in the Poetry packet, click HERE (part 2) and scroll down.  AP Essay rehash and Read "It's a Man's World" Click for POEM only, essays rubrics
  4. Read "Musee" aloud and groups look for DIDLS:  tone, diction, imagery, syntax, etc. in "Musee des Beaux Arts"  CLICK HERE FOR A COPY OF "MUSEE"
  5. Discuss  "Musee"--Gut reaction--is "Musee" an optimistic or a pessimistic poem.  What are the universal questions?  Why did I have you read "Meditation l7"?  What connections are there?  Click HERE for MUSEE section of poetry packet. 
  6. POETRY TERMS TODAY:    stanza, enjambment, apostrophe, sonnet, personification, juxtaposition, paradox/oxymoron, voice, repetition, syntax, diction, connotation, denotation, euphemism, perjorative,  DIDLS, simile, metaphor, essay, couplet, quatrain, meter, internal vs. end rhyme, slant rhyme,  couplet, triplet, quatrain,  octave, tone, imagery, mood, rhythm, synecdoche, metonymy, satire, free verse, rhymed verse, blank verse,  meter, metrical line, prologue, euphony, cacophony, voice, essay, couplet, quatrain, meter, internal vs. end rhyme, schema, ITAD, iambic, trochaic,  pun, couplet, quatrain,   sonnet--2 types: Shakespearean (3 quatrains=abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd   paradox/oxymoron,   free verse, rhymed verse, blank verse, rhythm, meter, metrical line, prologue,  heroic couplet,

HOMEWORK COLLECTED:  none

 
  1. FANTASTIC HEALTHY FOOD FRIDAY!Bring something yummy!

  2. Study for a TEST on scansion.  Study the pink scansion quiz (click HERE for a copy) and try any practice sonnet exercises for a little scanson/sonnet quiz tomorrow.  It's 20 test points!   Click HERE for additional scansion exercises with which to practice.  Click HERE for about 30 sonnets with which to practice.  At the end of the practice sonnets, there's some excellent info. on the sonnet form.   If you would like to read a Shakespearean sonnet every day, click http://www.sonnetaday.com/  for the link.  You can also get a sonnet e-mailed to you every single day by registering at this site!  Ahhh!  Finally, here is an excellent website that gives an overview of the sonnet and all kinds of variations.  Click http://www.sonnets.org/basicforms.htm 

     

  3. Assignment N:  AP essay for "A Woman's World" Before you start, find your salmon sheet  "HOW TO EXPLICATE A POEM." Click HERE if you need it.  READ OVER THIS SHEET CAREFULLY AND TRY TO APPLY THESE CONCEPTS AS YOU DO YOUR ESSAY.   HERE ARE THE DIRECTIONS NOW THAT YOU ARE READY TO START:  First read the poem carefully--probably twice Find a copy of the poem either on the yellow sheet you got today in class or on page P9 in your blue Poetry Packet or by clicking HERE.  The AP essay question is typed at the top.  Be sure to do the prewriting on the yellow sheet you got in class today or print this out by clicking HEREIf you would like a copy of this poem and the prewriting sheets, click HERE. This prewriting will be collected as well.  Spend no more than 10 minutes on this prewriting.  Now, set your timer for 30 minutes and write (or you may TYPE) the essay.  Stop exactly at 30 minutes.  After writing the essay, read  the rubric--both the long hand version and the little half slip you got in class today.  If you missed class, go to pages AP 3 and AP 4 in your Poetry Packet to read the rubrics. After writing the essay, give yourself a predicted score (1-9) and tell why you think you deserve this score. 

    Eavan Boland

           

    Carina (age 10), Wally, and Eavan Boland

     

  4. Work on your own part of the Poetry Presentation.  Re-read each individual prepares a section of ideas from the grey poetry grading sheet.  If you need to see a copy of this sheet, click HERE.  Here's a great help sheet--"How to Explicate a Poem." To print out a copy of our ADV. 12 POETRY TERMS, click HERE.
 
FRIDAY  day 27

SCANSION QUIZ

GROUP WORK ON POETRY PROJECT

TONE AND MOOD

The Great Gatsby

  

 

Quotes from The Great Gatsby

Page 100-101 "It is invariably saddening to look through new eyes at things upon which you have expended your own powers of adjustment."

Page 118 "It occurred to me that there was no difference between men, in intelligence or race, so profound as the difference between the sick and the well."

Page 170 "They were careless people, Tom and Daisy — they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made…"

Page 171 "I became aware of the old island here that flowered once for Dutch sailors’ eyes — a fresh, green breast of the new world. Its vanished trees, the trees that had made way for Gatsby’s house, had once pandered in whispers to the last and greatest of all human dreams; for a transitory enchanted moment man must have held his breath in the presence of this continent, compelled into an aesthetic contemplation he neither understood nor desired, face to face for the last time in history with something commensurate to his capacity for wonder."

Page 172 "tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms further…And on fine morning - / So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."

  

Quotes of the Day

from The Great Gatsby:

Page 8 "Gatsby turned out all right at the end; it is what preyed on Gatsby, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dreams that temporarily closed out my interest in the abortive sorrows and short-winded elations of men."

What women's shoes used to look like!  The "heels" were called "pedestals"--thus women had to be put up on their "pedestals."  The tour guide said they were very "tippy.

 

Today's allusion:

left-handed compliment

Today's Words of the Day:

scullion

schism

betimes

acquit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Group check-in:
    • weekend?
    • practice scansion quiz
    • C/C tone & mood exercises--assigned group part
    • practice scansion quiz
    • Share what you know of The Great Gatsby

     

  2. SLAM POETRY?--options:

    OTHER IDEAS:

    2nd hour: Billy Collins  "The Lanyard"

    3rd hour:  Oscar Brown "This Beach"

     

  3. SCANSION REVIEW--Go over practice SCANSION QUIZZES. Click here Click HERE for additional scansion exercises with which to practice.  Click HERE for about 30 sonnets with which to practice.  

  4. SCANSION TEST--review practice test and then take TEST

  5. 2nd hour:  finish large group discussion of Pope's poem-"Essay on Criticism"  Click HERE for HOW TO DO SCANSION hand-out. What is scansion? Go over PINK quiz.
  6. 2nd hour ONLY: GROUP GALLERY GUIDELINES ACTIVITY--put stickers on the top ones we decided as a group--Share your ratings of 5 guidelines and spend your $5 on the most important ones"-Debrief small group discussion. Write a comment or two as to why you gave your group discussion the rating you did. What a 5?  Why not a 5?

    Go over the top five and try to implement them today!

  7. Group Work on Poetry Project--20 min.--AGENDA Click HERE or HERE  for a copy of the planning agenda and the gray GROUP POEM PRESENTATION GRADING SHEET.  Click HERE or HERE for just the grading sheet.  ASSIGN group roles (recorder, reporter, analyzer/innovator, harmonizer, gatekeeper, networker) Click HERE) Group Poems--decide on journal entry and order Look over the POETRY PRESENTATION GRADING SHEET.  Jot down any further ideas for any of the Group Poems that come up immediately.

  8. 2nd hour:  finish large group discussion of Pope's poem-"Essay on Criticism"  Click HERE for HOW TO DO SCANSION hand-out. What is scansion? Go over PINK quiz.
  9. More on "Musee"

    a.  SHARE SOMETHING FROM THE BACK OF YOUR WA9--MORE ON AUDEN--something from page OP 20-24; OP 26-29 AND what you each thought about one of the "Musee" reviews, and Brian Russell's e-mail. 

    b.  Leftovers from "Musee"-What are the universal questions

    c.  Why did I have you read "Meditation l7"?  What connections are there?

    d.  911 CONNECTIONS:  Brian Russell's e-mail and read NY Times article "The Way We Were" and discuss how the poem is effectively used--the ploughman, where the last sentence uses word "signifying" (allusion),

    e.  Show Billy Collins parody on "Musee"   

    f. read Macbeth's speech "To-morrow and to-morrow"

    g. Read "Out, Out"  as groups look for tone, DIDLS.  Maybe view video.   Favorite Poem project  "Out, out"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1V07Hu5d_Dg&feature=user

    h.  Discuss Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

     If you would like to read Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery," you can get a copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

    i.  Show Auden "reading" "Musee":

    Auden reading "Musee"--poetry animations but his real voice

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZqftCZD2NI&feature=related

     

  10. TONE/MOOD ACTIVITIES---1.  Show TONE/MOOD words from exercise pages and Poetry Packet and relate those to "Musee" and "Out, Out-- See pages E1, E3, E4 in the Poetry packet for words to describe tone. and Specific Tone Words and show -How to Explicate a Poem sheet.    2. "C'mon Lou" activity   3.   Gatsby CLICK HERE  FOR THE GATSBY, THE STRANGER, AND ANOTHER FUN ASIMOV EXERCISE  4. Camus The Stranger activity  Click HERE. 5. TONE Multiple Choic Exercise: Click HERE to print out a copy of this exercise Click HERE for a sheet on more specific tone words.
  11. POETRY TERMS TODAY:    stanza, enjambment, apostrophe, sonnet, personification, juxtaposition, paradox/oxymoron, voice, repetition, syntax, diction, connotation, denotation, euphemism, perjorative,  DIDLS, simile, metaphor, essay, couplet, quatrain, meter, internal vs. end rhyme, slant rhyme,  couplet, triplet, quatrain,  octave, tone, imagery, mood, rhythm, synecdoche, metonymy, satire, free verse, rhymed verse, blank verse,  meter, metrical line, prologue, euphony, cacophony, voice, essay, couplet, quatrain, meter, internal vs. end rhyme, schema, ITAD, iambic, trochaic,  pun, couplet, quatrain,   sonnet--2 types: Shakespearean (3 quatrains=abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd   paradox/oxymoron,   free verse, rhymed verse, blank verse, rhythm, meter, metrical line, prologue,  heroic couplet,

HW Collected:

AP Essay

Tone Exercises

 
  1. Assignment 0: Read the AP essays on pages AP 5-10 in Poetry Packet and score them using the rubric on the yellow sheet you were given or in the Poetry Packet pp. AP3-4.  Make sure you write down justification for the scores on the essays themselves. For a copy of the essays in the Poetry packet, click HERE (part 2) and scroll down.  If you would like a copy of the poem, click HERE.

    Use the sheet to do your scoring which was given out in class today.  If you need a copy, click HERE.  If you need a copy of the rubric, click HERE.

     

  2. Do PR#2--remember your code and to type and DS the PR.  Make up a code name that starts with the alphabet letter you were assigned.  For example, if you were 2T, you could call yourself 2-Tamale or 2-Tupac Fan or 2-Tired to Think of a Name!
  3. DUE WEDNESDAY, OCT. 20th WA 12:  Final Poem  Choose one of the four poems listed below for your final poetry journal.  They are in your poetry packet.  For a pdf. copy of the BLUE POETRY PACKET, click HERE If you would like to print out a copy of these so you can have your own copy to actively mark up, click HERE

    a.        "The World is Too Much With Us"  by William Wordsworth (p. P29)

    b.       "God's Grandeur" by Gerard Manley Hopkins  (p. P309)

    c.        "Any Human to Another" by Countee Cullen  (p. P31)

    d.       "The Death of a Toad"  by  Richard Wilburs.   (p. P32)

    You have a choice of what to do for this journal. You need to choose ONE of the following

    1.   a literary analysis of the poem using lit. terms and uncovering the poem's universal questions

    2.  prepare a spoken word presentation of the poem and "perform" it either live in class or tape it

    3.  prepare a "script" for someone to do a spoken word presentation of the poem  Explain your choices.

    4.  prepare a "script" for a youtube type video to be made to accompany the reading of the poem.  See the example one done for Billy Collins' "Forgetfulness."

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-a8ELOVig4

     

  4. Work on your own part of the Poetry Presentation.  Re-read each individual prepares a section of ideas from the grey poetry grading sheet.  If you need to see a copy of this sheet, click HERE.  Here's a great help sheet--"How to Explicate a Poem." To print out a copy of our ADV. 12 POETRY TERMS, click HERE.
  5.  If you would like to read Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery," you can get a copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

  6. Got Beowulf?  If you like, get your own copy so you can actively read it!  Get Beowulf from school store--the Seamus Heaney translation (about 15.00 Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders?) or you can buy it USED for a couple of bucks + shipping.  Sweet deal!    Here's the Amazon link:  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0393320979/102-8754601-7566560?v=glance&n=283155&n=507846&s=books&v=glanceBarnes & Noble link: http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?userid=fg2YgSNCcb&isbn=0393320979&itm=3
  7.  
 
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
     
     
THURSDAY, day 26

Kate Mansfield

   

 

George Orwell

       

Today's Quote of the Day:

I think the next best thing to solving a problem is finding some humor in it. -Frank A. Clark, writer (1911- )

Today's allusion:

Svengali

Today's Words of the Day:

precipitous

reciprocal

abscond

adulate

Today's Quote of the Day:

From my close observation of writers... they fall into two groups: those who bleed copiously and visibly at any bad review, and those who bleed copiously and secretly at any bad review. -Isaac Asimov, scientist and writer (1920-1992)

Dissent is what rescues democracy from a quiet death behind closed doors.

-Lewis H. Lapham, editor (1935- )

Today's allusion:

Waterloo

Today's Words of the Day:

none

 

 

  1. Group Check-in:
    • Group Work on Poetry Project--AGENDA Click HERE or HERE  for a copy of the planning agenda and the gray GROUP POEM PRESENTATION GRADING SHEET.  Click HERE or HERE for just the grading sheet.  ASSIGN group roles (recorder, reporter, analyzer/innovator, harmonizer, gatekeeper, networker) Click HERE) Group Poems--decide on journal entry and order Look over the POETRY PRESENTATION GRADING SHEET.  Jot down any further ideas for any of the Group Poems that come up immediately.
    • share tone exercises
    • What do you know of Orwell, Mansfield, Basil, Imperialism?
    • C/C TONE EXERCISES: Click HERE.
    •  
  2. INTRO TO LIT. THEORY --walk through the packet and words of the day:  hermeneutics/(hermeneutical)--the study of the methodological principles of interpretation  and epistemic/ epistemology/ epistemological (related to the cognitive knowledge.  Also--"savoir" vs. "connaitre"

    DPS POEMS

    Eric Darby Scratch & Dent Dreams

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfTa4B7wQ_8

     
  3.  

 

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. WA 11 Final Poem Analysis--stamp
  2. 3rd hour only: Lit Theory notes (8 points):  Bressler/Appleman/your reaction to all this

 

  1. Assignment  Q:  Actively read two green articles on "active reading" and then these two short stories:  "Singing Lesson" and "Shooting an Elephant" 1. Read the two green articles about active reading--Moore's "How to Read" and Rosenblatt's "Life in the Margins."   Response to Active Reading articles (Moore and Rosenblatt) and "Singing Lesson" and "Shooting An Elephant"  Click HERE for actual copies of articles.  2. Then read the two stories.  Actively read the first one "Singing Lesson" but do not write on the actual story (we need these back).  Instead, either put a sheet of paper alongside the story to make a "margin" for comments. However, if you would like to print a copy of "The Singing Lesson" to do your ACTIVE READING, click here:   http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/SingLess.shtml      NOTE:  the evidence of active reading is worth 5 points!       FYI! (especially if you've been assigned Marxism, Feminist/Gender Criticism,  New Historicism, or Psycholanalytic theory:  Here is some biographical information on Katharine Mansfield:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katherine_Mansfield  or  http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/kmansfi.htm        If you would like to print a copy of "Shooting an Elephant," click here: http://www.online-literature.com/orwell/887/   Remember to NOT actively read this story (if you can stand it!).  For some biographical information on Orwell, click here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Orwell  NOTE! For a complete copy of the Lit. Theory Packet (with the paper section at the end), click HERE.
  2. Optional:  Get Beowulf from school store Seamus Heaney translation (about 16.00 Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders?)  We start reading Beowulf over MEA.  The next paper is based on Beowulf.  We will start Beowulf after MEA.
  3. For a current list of all journals assigned, click HERE!
 

 

 

FRIDAY, day 27

Friday, October 10

(that's NOT Friday the 13th, my friends!)

Here comes

LITERARY THEORY!

 

Orwell

 

 

Mansfield

 

 

 

Today's Quote of the Day:

Lying is done with words and also with silence. -Adrienne Rich, writer and teacher (1929- )

Today's allusion:

white elephant

Today's Words of the Day:

hermeneutics--the study of the methodological principles of interpretation

part of speech:  noun

adj form:  hermeneutical (interpretative)

adv. form:  hermeneutically

sentence from Bressler article in tonight's reading:  "Put another way, if there is only once correct interpretation of a text, what are the hermeneutical principles readers must use to discover this interpretation?" (p. 3)

trick:  Hermes the Greek god of invention, travel, herald, messenger of the other gods.  He brings the interpretation

etymology:  Greek, early modern English

epistemology--the study, theory or science that investigates the origin, nature and grounds of knowledge especially with reference to its limits and validity

part of speech:  noun

other forms:  epistemological, epistemologically, epistemologist

epistemic--of or relating to knowledge or knowing, cognitive

sentence from Bressler article in tonight's reading:  "Providing the academic arena in which those interested in literary theory (literary theorists) can posit philosophical assumptions concerning the nature of the reading process, the epistemological nature of learning, the nature of reality itself, and a host of related concerns, literary theory offers a variety of methodologies that enable readers to interpret a text from different and often conflicting points of view." (p. 11)

trick:  stem--knowledge is the stem

etymology:  Greek, early Modern English

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Group Check-in:
    • plans for the weekend
    • initial reactions to "Singing" vs. "Shooting" stories--did you prefer one over the other? Responses to Active reading vs. not active reading.  Jot down.
    • Group Work on Poetry Project--AGENDA Click HERE or HERE  for a copy of the planning agenda and the gray GROUP POEM PRESENTATION GRADING SHEET.  Click HERE or HERE for just the grading sheet.  ASSIGN group roles (recorder, reporter, analyzer/innovator, harmonizer, gatekeeper, networker) Click HERE) Group Poems--decide on journal entry and order Look over the POETRY PRESENTATION GRADING SHEET.  Jot down any further ideas for any of the Group Poems that come up immediately.
  2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTcOWR3uc0E&feature=related

  3. 2nd hour only:  Discuss Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

  4. "It's A Woman's World"--Read "It's a Woman's World" aloud. TONE WORDS?  evidence? Explain AP essay procedures; Go over rubric for scoring the AP Essays.  For a copy of the essays in the Poetry packet, click HERE (part 2) and scroll down.  AP Essay rehash and Read "It's a Man's World" Click for POEM only, essays rubrics

     

 

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. 2nd hour only:  Notes on Bressler/Appleman articles (5 pts) and personal reaction (3 pts) = 8 pts
  2. Active reading evidence of "Singing Lesson" ( 5 points)

 

 

 

 

  1. Read the poems assigned for the Poetry Presentations for Monday.  Then do the corresponding journals for each poem which is WA 12  GROUP POEMS (write at least 1/2-1 page per poem) Click HERE for 2nd hour to see which poems are assigned for Monday and what the exact journal(s) are for these poems.  Click HERE for 3rd hour to see which poems are assigned for Monday and what the exact journal(s) are for these poems. 

     

  2. Optional:  Get Beowulf from school store (4.50--Burton Raffel translation) or Seamus Heaney translation (about 16.00 Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders?)  We start reading Beowulf over MEA.  The next paper is based on Beowulf.
  3. 3rd hour: If you would like to read Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery," you can get a copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

    For a current list of all journals assigned, click HERE!

Goodbye, Minnesota!  Hello, England!

I up a blog for my England trip Oct. 12-19th and am hoping it'll work to send a few photos and jot down a few comments each night. Check it out! Of course, the "best laid plans . . . "

Here's the URL:

http://england2008lindapaula.blogspot.com/

You can comment right on it, too. It would be fun to hear from you! Miss ya already!

 

NO SCHOOL!

  Yippee!

MEA BREAK

NO SCHOOL!

 

SLAM POETRY?--Show 

Taylor Mali

"Like Lilly Like Wilson"

Interview of Taylor Mali:  What is “slam poetry”?  “Undivided Attention” poem

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vpDE9tkgF4&feature=related

"Conviction"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qv0aDhqxiHg&feature=related

“What Teachers Make” Bowery Poetry Club

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xuFnP5N2uA&feature=related

”The Miracle Workers”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9vMHSGmGtuo&feature=related

 

OTHER DPS:

Gina Loring "Somewhere there's a poem"

Alicia Keys

"POW" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLk_Q3Cq2Ns  

 Rat Sack,

"I'm losing you"  youtube

Bassey Ikpi's 

 "Sometimes Silence"

"Homeward"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTcOWR3uc0E&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTcOWR3uc0E

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTcOWR3uc0E&mode=related&search=

Diallo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tj4C8riMsKI

Apology to My Unborn

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzyrHsYTveE&feature=related

Poetri

Money

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZENZnjk7Vfw

Krispy Kreme

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ht9lB-hebJw&feature=relate

Eric Darby

Scratch & Dent Dreams

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfTa4B7wQ_8

Oscar Brown, Jr.

"This Beach"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRFb-D1gYY0&feature=related

 

 

FANTASTIC HEALTHY FOOD WEDNESDAY!Bring something yummy!