ARCADIA PIX and LINKS

 

CONGRATS, Mr. OLSON! 

ARCADIA HERE HE COMES!

June 12-14th, 2009

Folger Shakespeare Theatre

Washington, D.C.

"ET IN ARCADIA EGO"

Folger Shakespeare Library

201 East Capitol Street, SE

Washington, DC 20003

www.folger.edu/theatre

"Y'know how there are plays...that refresh you just by being there...that remind you why you fell in love with theater?

Arcadia does that for me. The production is a corker. I'm aglow." --Bob Mondello, NPR

This modern masterpiece, part history, part mystery, calibrates the relationship between the past and present in the lush setting of an English country house.

 Stoppard's play is wildly intelligent, extremely funny, and poignantly human.

Learn More about Arcadia

http://www.folger.edu/woSummary.cfm?woid=465

It started out just like most annual Drama Awards banquets . . .

Little does he suspect what's coming!

Then Suzie appears with an Arcadia playbill. 

                                      Then Strampe appears with 2 Arcadia t-shirts! 

Then Wally appears with a Serendipity tote bag with a . . .  what?   a tortoise!

. . . a tortoise wearing a post-it that says . . .  

"Hi.  My name is Plautus/Lightning.  Read the Couch of Eros by Ezra Chater" (This is an integral part of the play Arcadia)

Here's Plautus refreshing his memory on the play.

 

Am I really getting a tortoise to keep?

Wait!  There just happens to be a copy of The Couch of Eros in that Serendipity bag! 

And three letters in the book, too,  . . . hmmmm . . . just like in Arcadia!

He opens Letter #1. . .   Wow! airline tickets to Washington, D.C. for June 12-14th!

Letter #2. . . Wow!  2 nights hotel at the Capitol Suites in Washington, D.C. for June 12-14th!

Letter #3. . .  You guessed it!  2 tickets to see Arcadia Saturday, June 13th at the Folger in Washington, D.C.!

And here is a box Marie Strampe decorated with all the notes and memories from former AP students, drama fans, and the EPHS faculty--all who donated to Rolf's surprise!

Congrats!  You deserve it, Mr. O!!!

Meet the sneaky parties--Wally, Cindy, Mary, and Suzie!

the Olson family:  Erin, Ian, Rolf, and Cindy

. . . and don't forget Plautus/Lightning!

  

  

 

 

 

Get Smart: Math in Arcadia

http://www.folger.edu/template.cfm?cid=3217

 

Arcadia Photo Album from the Folger Library Production May-June 2009

http://www.flickr.com/photos/folgershakespearelibrary/sets/72157617949706941/

Learn More about Arcadia

http://www.folger.edu/woSummary.cfm?woid=465

Buy Tickets

http://purchase.tickets.com/buy/TicketPurchase?organ_val=248&event_val=TH05

Get Smart: Math in Arcadia

http://www.folger.edu/template.cfm?cid=3217

Arcadia Photo Album from the Folger Library Production May-June 2009

http://www.flickr.com/photos/folgershakespearelibrary/sets/72157617949706941/

Check out this website to help you make FRACTALS:

http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Hangar/7959/fractalapplet.html

 

Arcadia

Welcome to

"ET IN ARCADIA EGO"

Arcadia is an actual region of Greece, a series of valleys surrounded by high mountains and therefore difficult of access. In very ancient times, the people of Arcadia were known to be rather primitive herdsmen of sheep, goats and bovines, rustic folk who led an unsophisticated yet happy life in the natural fertility of their valleys and foothills. Soon, however, their down-to-earth culture came to be closely associated with their traditional singing and pipe playing, an activity they used to pass the time as they herded their animals. Their native god was Pan, the inventor of the Pan pipes (seven reeds of unequal length held together by wax and string). The simple, readily accessible and moving music Pan and the Arcadian shepherds originated soon gained a wide appreciation all over the Greek world. This pastoral (in Latin "pastor" = shepherd) music began to inspire highly educated poets, who developed verses in which shepherds exchanged songs in a beautiful natural setting preserved pristine from any incursions from a dangerous "outside."

In the seventeenth century, the French painter Nicolas Poussin (1594-1665) used this pictorial tradition to paint one of his most famous canvasses, known as "The Arcadian shepherds" or as "ET IN ARCADIA EGO" (1647). This painting represents four Arcadians, in a meditative and melancholy mood, symmetrically arranged on either side of a tomb. One of the shepherds kneels on the ground and reads the inscription on the tomb: ET IN ARCADIA EGO, which can be translated either as "And I [= death] too (am) in Arcadia" or as "I [= the person in the tomb] also used to live in Arcadia." The second shepherd seems to discuss the inscription with a lovely girl standing near him. The third shepherd stands pensively aside. From Poussin's painting, Arcadia now takes on the tinges of a melancholic contemplation about death itself, about the fact that our happiness in this world is very transitory and evanescent. Even when we feel that we have discovered a place where peace and gentle joy reign, we must remember that it will end, and that all will vanish.
 

ARCADIA

by Tom Stoppard

directed by Aaron Posner

on stage at Folger Theatre through June 14

Folger Shakespeare Library

201 East Capitol Street, SE

Washington, DC 20003

www.folger.edu/theatre

"Y'know how there are plays...that refresh you just by being there...that remind you why you fell in love with theater? Arcadia does that for me. The production is a corker. I'm aglow." --Bob Mondello, NPR

This modern masterpiece, part history, part mystery, calibrates the relationship between the past and present in the lush setting of an English country house. Stoppard's play is wildly intelligent, extremely funny, and poignantly human.

WE LOVE FRACTALS!

website to help you make FRACTALS:

http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Hangar/7959/fractalapplet.html

Check out this website to help you make FRACTALS:

http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Hangar/7959/fractalapplet.html

 

Hannah, Bernard, Gus

Guess who?  and what scene?

Septimus and Jellaby--what scene, do you think?

Thomasina and Septimus

 

 

Lord Byron in Arcadia

George Gordon  aka Lord Byron

Although Lord Byron (1788-1824)  never appears in  Arcadia, much of the plot revolves around him and gossip concerning him. During his short life Byron pursued love, fame, and adventure, became continually enmeshed in sexual and literary scandal, assisted a revolution in Greece (where he died of fever at thirty-six), and, along the way, became one of the major poets of his time.
 

"About suffering, they were never wrong

the old masters.  How well they understood"