rev. last 6/11/11

                                

 Welcome to the AP Class of 2012!

 

Click HERE for PHOTO GALLERY ARCHIVES of our previous AP classes--2004-2011!

Click  HERE for the CLASS OF 2011 PHOTO GALLERY.

Click the following website for the WEB ALBUM GALLERY:

https://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011APLitClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIre876Uxtrs2wE#

Click HERE for the CLASS OF 2010 PHOTO GALLERY.

 

2011 CALENDAR

WHAT'S GOING ON IN AP Lit & Comp  TODAY

The calendar feature of this website is always in progress.  Check back often for updates.  We try to update the calendar daily; however, do not rely on this website solely to find out what we did in class and what was turned in.  Your main method of getting assignments and knowing what to turn in should be your own recording on our in-class homework calendar. You can always e-mail your study partner and, if necessary, Rolf or Wally to double-check on homework: rolson@edenpr.org or lwallenberg@edenpr.org

Click HERE for another copy of the 4 week IVORY HW calendar.

Click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  

Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals.
week 1   Jan. 31-Feb. 4th   NEW WEEK 10 April 11-15  Hamlet Field Trip to Theatre in the Round  Thursday, April 14
week 2  Feb. 7-12  Selgae's!  Happy Valentine's Day! NEW WEEK 11 April 18-22 Someone's Birthday (April 23rd)!
week 3   Feb. 14-18   NEW WEEK 12  April 25-29  OLES & WALLIES BACK TOGETHER AGAIN!
NEW WEEK 4 Feb. 21-25 PRESIDENTS' DAY--NO SCHOOL (Feb. 21) NEW WEEK 13-May 3-May 6  AP EXAM WEEK #1--AP Lit & Comp 7:30 a.m. Thursday, May 5th  CONFERENCES Thursday night only! 4:30-8:30
NEW WEEK 5  Feb 28-March 4    CONFERENCES Tuesday, March 1 & Thursday, March 3rd       NO SCHOOL March 4th! NEW WEEK 14  May 9-13   AP EXAM WEEK #2 --AP Lang 7:30 a.m. Wednesday, May 11th    PROM Friday May 13th
 NEW WEEK 6 March 7-March 11 NEW WEEK 15 May 16-20
NEW WEEK 7 March 14-March 18    BEWARE THE IDES OF MARCH & NEW WEEK 16  May 23- May 27
NEW WEEK 8  March 21-March 25 NEW WEEK 17 May 30-June 3 Memorial Day NO SCHOOL May 30th
NEW WEEK 9  March 28-April 1   MIDTERM/SPRING BREAK BEGINS NO SCHOOL on Friday, April 1st NEW WEEK 18 June 6-11th     GRADUATION June 10th! That's it, folks!  IT'S SUMMERTIME! Go out and do your "wild & precious" life, and let us hear about it, too!  :)
 

week 19 

Click  HERE for the CLASS OF 2011 PHOTO GALLERY.

Click the following website for the WEB ALBUM GALLERY:

https://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011APLitClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIre876Uxtrs2wE#

Click HERE for the CLASS OF 2010 PHOTO GALLERY.

Click HERE for PHOTO GALLERY ARCHIVES of our previous AP classes!

 

HEADS UP! 

 Class of 2012, we're going on a field trip this semester:

Ragtime at the Park Square Theatre-- Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2012

 Cost is $____  Due date ____. Click HERE to print out the permission form.

BRING a SEPARATE check for $5.00 for the EPHS SURVIVAL MANUAL FOR WRITING PAPERS.  Major rule changes made all our old materials "extinct," so we gathered all the necessary materials and put together a manual that our students will find necessary when writing papers-grammar rules, formatting, documentation procedures, etc., are all in the manual.  It is bound, color-coded, and has worked great with all students who ordered it this year.  All students need to purchase the manual, so please bring a check immediately for $5.00 made out to "EP SCHOOLS-SURVIVAL MANUAL."  We will be using the manuals right away.  Without one, students will need to use the online version available on our EPHS English Department home page:

http://ephs.edenpr.org/index.php?option=com_qcontacts&view=category&catid=76&Itemid=123

8 JUNE 2010

CONGRATULATIONS IF YOU ARE REGISTERED AS A MEMBER OF THE

 AP ENGLISH LIT. CLASS OF 2011-12!

Greetings!  We are writing this letter to inform you that you have registered for our Advanced Placement Literature 12 program.  This letter is official welcome to the course, an overview of our philosophy and your outside of class novel reading assignment. Please open all the attachments to this e-mail regarding the class so that you have a CLEAR understanding of what this class entails.

We are also writing to let you know that you have an AP LIT.  INFORMATION PACKET that MUST be completed ASAP.  This is a requirement to take the course and the completion of the packet will actually be factored into your grade if you do not complete it.  The deadline for completion was WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8th.  There is a box at the secretary’s desk in the English Resource Center to pick up a packet AND to turn in your completed packet.  Do not delay!  All students whose packets are not turned in will be removed from the class. 

Note!  We need your current e-mail, and if your e-mail should change between now and January next year, you MUST inform us.  We will be communicating periodically with you via e-mail.  PLEASE SEND US AN E-MAIL ASAP AND LET US KNOW THAT YOU HAVE DECIDED TO BECOME PART OF OUR CLASS AND SO THAT WE HAVE YOUR CORRECT E-MAIL.

ABOUT AP ENGLISH LITERATURE.

AP English Literature is a semester long team-taught class.  This means that unless the schedule prohibits it, during 2nd hour some of you will be studying a unit with Mr. Olson while others are studying another unit the same term and hour but in a different room with Ms. Wallenberg.  Often, we will also combine classes in a large group setting.  By coordinating both terms and hours, we definitely accomplish more during our semester together.

A RIGOROUS COURSE:  AP English Literature is a rigorous program designed for the high-achieving, highly-motivated college-bound student.  You can expect a course as identical to a college class as possible.  You must have mastery of writing essays, confidence in analyzing literature, commitment to hard work, and a strong desire to participate fully in a discussion-based class.  These classes will not teach you basics.  The basics of English grammar, punctuation, and organization of an essay are prerequisites.  In addition, a dedication to stretching yourself creatively is highly desired.  

Our experience with A. P. English exams over the years has shown us that Eden Prairie students need, quite frankly, to read more from what is known as the "canon" (those established works considered by many to be the "great literature" of the ages).  Moreover, serious students simply need to spend more time reading.   Becoming more widely read in great literature is one of the best ways to expand your vocabulary as well.  You will also widen your view of the world through the vicarious experiences you receive from literature.  Furthermore, you will enhance your critical skills and develop your own personal response to and appreciation of literature. 

SUMMER READING REQUIREMENT

Even though we will spend an entire semester together, the time is still very limiting.  So as not to overburden you with an inordinate amount of reading during the course itself, we require all AP English students to read Four novels:  one modern novel and three literary classics. 

NOTE:  This reading must be done BEFORE the first day of class.  You might be scheduled to have this class 1st semester.  If so, your due date would be the first day of school in September.  You might be scheduled to have this class 2nd semester.  If so, your due date would be the first day of class 2nd semester.  You will probably not know your schedule until August, so plan to read the novels before September 1st.

Your four required summer reading texts are:

·        A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving

·        Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

·        Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens   

·        Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

You will need to purchase your own copies at a local bookstore so you can "actively read" the texts.  Many college professors require evidence of "active reading" in texts.  This means making personal notes in the margins of your books. 

So, you must actively read the three texts AND take separate reading notes which might include some or all of the following:  recording questions, making connections, looking for symbols, tracking plot structure and character development, as well as identifying major themes in the texts.  Expect that your first AP practice essay exams the first week of class will be based on the three novels you read.  Later in the term you will write a paper based on these texts, so it will be invaluable for you to later have the active reading and reading notes to refresh your memory.   Happy Reading!

Also, be sure to visit our AP website for updates, etc.  Our AP website is updated daily and contains many, many important documents for the class.  Here is the URL for the AP HOME PAGE:     http://teachers.edenpr.org/~lwallenberg/APlitmasterfolder/index.htm

And here is the URL for our AP HOMEWORK CALENDAR:

http://teachers.edenpr.org/~lwallenberg/APlitmasterfolder/2006-7%20AP%20weekly%20calendar/2008APcalendarmainpageANDphotoGALLERY.htm

Thank you for your interest in a challenging and rewarding educational experience.  If you have any further questions, come see us in the English department after school starts.    We look forward to seeing you third term next year!

Sincerely,

 Linda Wallenberg (email Lwallenberg@edenpr.org /voice mail 952 975-4303)

and Rolf Olson (email Rolson@edenpr.org /voice mail 952 975-4294)

Eden Prairie High School  AP English Instructors              

YOUR FIRST AP ENGLISH ASSIGNMENT

“Actively read” and take “reading notes” on the following  FOUR novels (about 1,500 pages of reading)  BEFORE the first day of the class next school year.   The following are the three required novels for AP English 12 2009-10

·        A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving

·        Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

·        Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens  

·        Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

What is “Active Reading”?

The Goal of Active Reading: To own what you read.   The objectives:

Ø       To have ideas and opinions about a reading;

Ø       To retrieve information quickly;

Ø       To organize information from the reading;

Ø       To increase comprehension, vocabulary, analytical and evaluation skills, links with what a reader already knows, long term memory;

Ø       To improve working knowledge of the literal aspects of a work;

Ø       To allow readers to deepen original ideas;

Ø       To help the reader inductively discover the meaning of a work and to have stated it in his own words;

Ø       To find the purpose the author had in writing the work;

Ø       To provide ideas and questions for class discussion;

Ø       To have a “conversation” with an author

Ø       To think as one reads

HERE’S HOW (IN GENERAL)

Generally, for Active Reading of passages, highlight, box, star, code, translate, paraphrase, summarize over or beside lines, sentences, and passages. On pages, write notes in margins, on bottoms, tops, or in corners and/or add post it notes to accommodate reader’s notes. On end flaps, create titled lists and categories of information and collect information under these categories with quoted, key words from passages and the page number next to the quoted word (fuller notes should be made on the entire quote in the text itself)

HERE’S HOW (IN MORE DETAIL)

Analyze, evaluate, speculate about the title before beginning to read and then come back to the title after reading and summarize its relevance – always write a sentence or so explaining its relevance to the theme or thesis of the story/article;

o       Examine chapter or section titles or headings before, during, and after reading;

o       Identify and comment on the narration – 1st or 3rd person, why? Omniscient, dramatic, participating – why? Present tense? Past tense? Why? Formal or informal? Educated or not – why? Keep a section in the front of the book to add to a growing understanding of the narration, point of view, tone, and mood of the piece. Decide and write the author’s purpose for this narrative choice.

o       Analyze the narrator as a character, even in nonfiction works – decide and comment on why he is reliable and unreliable.

o       Highlight or underline important ideas;

o       Write parallel lines to the side of passages too long to highlight but which need emphasis;

o       Star ideas of utmost importance;

o       Circle and define unfamiliar vocabulary words or ones with archaic or unusual meanings;

o       Cycle, box, or color-code with a highlighter groups or series of words that work together to develop an image, motif, theme, character, main idea, or some other element.

o       Place post it notes as markers at the edge of the page with a note as to the significance of that page;

o       Write analytical notes, paraphrases, ideas in the margins that will help the reader remember thoughts about the content of the page;

o       Place a post it note on the page to write summaries, paraphrases, comments, analyses that will not fit in the margins;

o       Write key words that identify a symbol, image, or other important idea in the

upper outside corner of pages so that when the reader flips through the book, he easily sees what significant idea, etc, is on the page and which has been thoroughly noted in the text of the page;

o       Color code various elements of fiction, tropes, images – what ever needs to be identified, collected, and traced throughout the book and then create a legend on the front flap of the book;

o       Start cross-referenced lists on the front and back pages (or add larger post-it notes) – wherever there is space that list characters names, themes, images, metaphors, symbols, etc. For each, quote a key word and write the page number next to it. Cross-reference by highlighting the information on the actual page of text with more in-depth comments, etc.

o       Cross reference images, motifs, recurring important ideas, etc. Start a list on an end flap that gives a title to the group, e.g., “Christian Imagery” pp. 6,9, 15, 80, 210, etc. On each page highlight and comment on the example itself.

o       Comment in the margins – react personally, agree, disagree, compare or contrast to previous knowledge/ another book / ideas;

o       Write questions about what is not understood

o       Predict what might happen;

o       Speculate – “What if the character had done…?” “What if the writer had been [different in some way]?”

o       Identify, highlight, and comment on all explicit and implicit references to the themes or theses of the writing.

o       Paraphrase all confusing poetic sentences, prose sentences, or passages.

o       Summarize (always in your own words) paragraphs, passages, sections, chapters, etc., to make sure the text is really understood;

o       Fold pages in certain ways to code important parts of the book –

HERE ARE SOME REMINDERS

Ø       Highlight sparingly – coloring the entire reading does not help important information to stand out;

Ø       Cross reference – use end flaps to gather numerous page numbers with examples of the same technique or idea

Ø       Create individual coding systems that work for the reader

Ø       Remind oneself that active reading is a reader’s dialogue with the author;

Ø       Standardize where various kinds of notes appear (bottom right, top right, etc.) so that a reader can easily retrieve information of a certain kind, i.e., plot summaries are under chapter headings or references to a character’s personality are at the bottom right of pages or highlighted in yellow, etc.

Ø       Outlines, summaries, paraphrases are in the reader’s own words

For more information on Active Reading, you may want to read Mortimer J. Adler’s essay “How To Mark A Book.” From The Saturday Review of Literature, July 6, 1940, pp. 11-12 Copyright 1940, The Sat. Review Co., Inc.; renewed 1967 Sat. Review, Inc.

 

The rubrics below will be used to grade your active reading of each novel.  You will need to print these out and self-score your “active reading” by the first day of class:

Evaluation for AP Lit & Comp Summer ACTIVE READING

Name _______________________________________  Due date:  ______________________

·        Work: A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving

total

·        Work: Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

total

In-text margin notes and marking:  As you read, keep a record of the following—storyline, key events, characters, changes in character, key quotations, new/important vocabulary, symbols, imagery.  Do this by highlighting, color coding, underlining, writing notes in margins, on bottoms, tops, or in corners of pages, and/or adding post it notes to accommodate your notes. etc.

(+6)

 

Student self score:

 

_____/6

 

 

teacher score:

 

____/6

 

In-text margin notes and marking:  As you read, keep a record of the following—storyline, key events, characters, changes in character, key quotations, new/important vocabulary, symbols, imagery.  Do this by highlighting, color coding, underlining, writing notes in margins, on bottoms, tops, or in corners of pages, and/or adding post it notes to accommodate your notes. etc.

(+6)

 

Student self score:

 

_____/6

 

 

teacher score:

 

____/6

 

On end flaps or on separate sheets of paper:  create titled lists of character names, symbols, significant quotations, motifs, themes, and vocabulary.  Be sure to include page numbers on your lists(+6)

Student self score:

 

_____/6

 

teacher score:

 

____/6

On end flaps or on separate sheets of paper:  create titled lists of character names, symbols, significant quotations, motifs, themes, and vocabulary.  Be sure to include page numbers on your lists (+6)

Student self score:

 

_____/6

 

teacher score:

 

____/6

In-text personal commentary: 

As you read, keep a record of the following—agree, disagree, compare or contrast to previous knowledge/ another book / ideas; write questions about what is not understood, predictions of what might happen “What if the character had done…?”   (+6)

Student self score:

 

_____/6

 

 

 

teacher score:

 

____/6

In-text personal commentary: 

As you read, keep a record of the following—agree, disagree, compare or contrast to previous knowledge/ another book / ideas; write questions about what is not understood, predictions of what might happen “What if the character had done…?”   (+6)

Student self score:

 

_____/6

 

 

 

teacher score:

 

____/6

 

Parent/student signature verification (+2)

____/2

 

Parent/student signature verification   (+2)

____/2

Student comments:

 

 

____/20

Student comments:

 

 

 

_____/20

 

Evaluation for AP Lit & Comp Summer ACTIVE READING

Name _______________________________________  Due date:  ______________________

 

·        Work: Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens  

total

·        Work: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

total

In-text margin notes and marking:  As you read, keep a record of the following—storyline, key events, characters, changes in character, key quotations, new/important vocabulary, symbols, imagery.  Do this by highlighting, color coding, underlining, writing notes in margins, on bottoms, tops, or in corners of pages, and/or adding post it notes to accommodate your notes. etc.

(+6)

 

Student self score:

 

_____/6

 

 

teacher score:

 

____/6

 

In-text margin notes and marking:  As you read, keep a record of the following—storyline, key events, characters, changes in character, key quotations, new/important vocabulary, symbols, imagery.  Do this by highlighting, color coding, underlining, writing notes in margins, on bottoms, tops, or in corners of pages, and/or adding post it notes to accommodate your notes. etc.

(+6)

 

Student self score:

 

_____/6

 

 

teacher score:

 

____/6

 

On end flaps or on separate sheets of paper:  create titled lists of character names, symbols, significant quotations, motifs, themes, and vocabulary.  Be sure to include page numbers on your lists (+6)

Student self score:

 

_____/6

 

teacher score:

 

____/6

On end flaps or on separate sheets of paper:  create titled lists of character names, symbols, significant quotations, motifs, themes, and vocabulary.  Be sure to include page numbers on your lists(+6)

Student self score:

 

_____/6

 

teacher score:

 

____/6

In-text personal commentary: 

As you read, keep a record of the following—agree, disagree, compare or contrast to previous knowledge/ another book / ideas; write questions about what is not understood, predictions of what might happen “What if the character had done…?”   (+6)

Student self score:

 

_____/6

 

 

 

teacher score:

 

____/6

In-text personal commentary: 

As you read, keep a record of the following—agree, disagree, compare or contrast to previous knowledge/ another book / ideas; write questions about what is not understood, predictions of what might happen “What if the character had done…?”   (+6)

Student self score:

 

_____/6

 

 

 

teacher score:

 

____/6

Parent/student signature verification (+2)

____/2

 

Parent/student signature verification   (+2)

____/2

 

Student comments:

 

 

 

____/20

Student comments:

 

 

____/20

 

Your first writing assignment (This is due the very first day of class!)

Do JOURNAL ENTRY OJ#1:  QUOTE PONDERING

Because this is a course which relies heavily on your input and willingness to jump into discussion, let's start with your personal reaction to one of the following quotations.  Choose the quote below that strikes/interests you most.  Discuss what you think the quotation means literally, what it might say about society, and what personal connections you might draw from your own experiences with reading or in your own life.  Finally, it is expected that you use any applicable/relevant examples that come to mind from the three summer reading texts to exemplify the main points you are making in your discussion.  Before you start, be sure to read the suggested questions/ideas for consideration listed further down below the quotes.

This journal entry must be at least two double-spaced typed pages (or two single-spaced pages of notebook paper).   We highly recommend your typing your journals.  Start a file for them on your computer.

PART ONE OF JOURNAL #1 (one side):  CHOOSE ONE OF THESE REQUIRED QUOTES:

QUOTE 1:        

                The whole point of literature is to have sympathies, imaginative relationships with people who are different from one’s self.  --Irving Howe         

FURTHER IDEAS TO PONDER WHEN WRITING ABOUT THIS QUOTE:

"The whole point"--really?  What other points might there be?  What books have touched you, made you feel empathy, changed you?  Were they usually books assigned in school or those you read at home?  What differences were there between you and the characters whose stories most affected you?  Were the two of you, in retrospect, more alike than different? 

QUOTE 2:              

                When Power leads man towards arrogance, literature reminds him of his limitations.  When Power narrows the area of man’s concern, literature reminds him of his richness and diversity of existence.  When Power corrupts, literature cleanses.               --John F. Kennedy

FURTHER IDEAS TO PONDER WHEN WRITING ABOUT THIS QUOTE:

Why "arrogance"?  why "corrupts"? why "cleanses"?  what connotations/possibilities are there?  Did the fact that Kennedy wrote this quote have any impact on you?  Negatively?  Positively? 

QUOTE 3:        

                [ . . . ] the universe focuses those who live in it to understand it.  Those creatures who find everyday experience a muddled jumble of events with no predictability, no regularity, are in grave peril.  The universe belongs to those who, at least to some degree, have figured it out.                              --Carl Sagan         

FURTHER IDEAS TO PONDER WHEN WRITING ABOUT THIS QUOTE:

The "universe"?   why "creatures"?  why "grave peril"?   why  "belongs"?                                                                                                                           

QUOTE 4:        

                On this day he (the Virginian) was bidding her farewell before undertaking the most important trust which Judge Henry had yet given him.  For this journey she had provided him with Sir Walter Scott’s Kenilworth.  Shakespeare he had returned to her.  He had bought Shakespeare for himself.  “As soon as I got used to readin’ it,” he had told her, “I knowed for certain that I liked readin’ for enjoyment.”       --Owen Wister

 

FURTHER IDEAS TO PONDER WHEN WRITING ABOUT THIS QUOTE:

Why the incorrect grammar?  How did that color your impressions of him? Why did he buy Shakespeare?  For enjoyment?

QUOTE 5:        

                Readers may be divided into four classes:

                1.             Sponges, who absorb all they read and return it nearly in the same state, only a little dirtied.

                2.             Sand-glasses, who retain nothing and are content to get through a book for the sake of getting through the time.

                3.             Strain-bags, who retain merely the drags of what they read.

                4.             Mogul diamonds, equally rare and valuable, who profit by what they read, and enable others to

profit by it also.                                                                                                                   --Samuel Taylor Coleridge

FURTHER IDEAS TO PONDER WHEN WRITING ABOUT THIS QUOTE:

Why "a little dirtied"?  connotations of "strain-bags" and "drags"?  Mogul diamonds?  Why "mogul"?

PART TWO OF JOURNAL #1 (one additional side):  YOUR ALL-TIME FAVORITE QUOTES

After you have completed your discussion on one of the required quotes, continue the journal with a list of three of your all-time favorite quotes.  Say something about why you chose each of them.  Maybe you want to share why they are meaningful to you, how they apply to your life, and/or how you ran across them.

 ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  CLICK BELOW for COPIES OF DOCUMENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT OUR CLASS

CLASS OF 2012

  1. Welcome Letter to Class of 2012 and Summer Reading and Writing Assignment 

  2. SUMMER READING RUBRICS

  3. MAJOR WORKS DATA SHEETS (will need to be completed for each summer novel)

  4. AP Lit SYLLABUS

  5. AP LIT CLASS OF 2012 INFO PACKET  You must complete this packet and return it via e-mail or drop off in the ERC by JUNE 8, 2011.   Click HERE for the WORD FORMAT SO YOU CAN TYPE IN YOUR RESPONSES.  Note:  You will receive points for this.

  6. OUR  FIELD TRIP--CLASS OF 2012!

     

    Ragtime at the Park Square Theatre-- Wednesday, Feb. 14 , 2012—all day

    We will be going to downtown St. Paul to the Park Square.   This experience will include advanced small group workshops,  a  “Build a Moment” experience, as well as another chance to meet with the cast after the show.  Cost $________  due date____________.  Click HERE  for the permission form.

 

 

updated last on 1/28/10

WELCOME TO WALLY & OLSON'S AP ENGLISH LIT & COMP!

 

Click  HERE for the CLASS OF 2011 PHOTO GALLERY.

Click the following website for the WEB ALBUM GALLERY:

https://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011APLitClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIre876Uxtrs2wE#

Click HERE for the CLASS OF 2010 PHOTO GALLERY.

Click HERE for PHOTO GALLERY ARCHIVES of our previous AP classes!

 

"'Tell me what you read and I'll tell you who you are'

is true enough, but I'd know you better if you told me what you reread."

Francois Muriac

 

 

 

 

 

updated May 26, 2011

 

                       Hello!   Your instructors in AP English Literature are

 Linda Wallenberg and Rolf Olson.  We have the pleasure of being your teachers this term--your teachers of a course that we absolutely love to teach!   We are teaching this class because we have some strong feelings about the importance of literature and writing in our everyday lives.  Let us share a little of my course philosophy.

 

Literature we know, because we have read it and because we continue to read it, provides us with vicarious experiences.  There is not enough time on the clock, and there is not universe enough physically for any person to enter all the experiences and to meet all the people he or she must meet to be all he or she can be.  Some of them we need to get out of books.  Literature helps us to make contact with history with history made and in the making, to recognize that our emotions are old, still valid, that the questions that count are the unanswerable ones, the ones we have to live by.  We hope that in our journey together, you will be inspired to answer some of these questions for yourselves--as a result of studying the literature we will encounter this term. 

Dear soon-to-be A. P. English (CLASS of 2012) student:

We hope you'll have a great senior year  and will be fully engaged in making this year the best it can be!   Believe it or not, before you know it, you will begin AP LIT!

CLICK HERE FOR THE REQUIRED INFO PACKET DUE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011 IN ORDER TO BE IN THE CLASS

CLICK HERE FOR THE GREEN WELCOME LETTER TO BE SENT IN THE FALL OF 2011.

We want to remind you of the required summer reading. 

All AP LIT. students must have read all 4 novels on the list below BEFORE the first day of class.

·        A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving

·        Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

·        Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens    

·        Pride and Prejudice  by Jane Austen

We REQUIRE that along with your reading, particularly if you read these texts long before the term starts, that you "actively" read all FOUR texts take separate "reading notes" which might include some or all of the following:  recording questions, making connections, looking for symbols, tracking plot structure and character development, as well as identifying major themes in the texts.  Be sure to bring your marked-up texts to class!  NOTE!

Click HERE  for a reminder on how to "actively read"

Click HERE for the RUBRIC (how you will be evaluated on this active reading).

PLEASE PRINT OUT THIS RUBRIC AND FILL IT OUT FOR THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS.  We are interested in how you would score yourself.  We, of course, reserve the right to change your scores!

This journal entry must be at least two double-spaced typed pages (or two single-spaced pages of notebook paper).   We highly recommend your typing your journals.  Start a file for them on your computer.

Label this first journal " For the particulars of this assignment, click HERE.

Note!  PLEASE SEND US YOUR CURRENT E-MAIL ASAP SO WE HAVE YOURS RECORDED CORRECTLY.   If your e-mail should change between now and January next year, you MUST inform us.  We will be communicating periodically with you via e-mail.  For example, we have some field trips planned for next year, and we will be needing to collect money even before you actually begin the course with us.  Here's how to contact us:  Wally's e-mail lwallenberg@edenpr.org  or voice mail 952 975-4303 or Olson's e-mail Rolson@edenpr.org or voice mail 952 975-4294.

Also, be sure to visit our AP website for updates, etc.  Our AP website is updated daily and contains many, many important documents for the class. 

Here is the URL for this AP HOME PAGE:     http://teachers.edenpr.org/~lwallenberg/APlitmasterfolder/index.htm

Click HERE  to go directly to our AP HOMEWORK CALENDAR

  

   

 

 

Like a little knowledge, a little literacy is a dangerous thing.  

 

As Shakespeare said in Henry V, "All things be ready if our minds be." 

 

Are you ready?  If so, read on.

 

 

 

This website is meant to be informative, helpful, and a means for you to access some of the course documents online.

 

Here is a list of the site contents:

HOW TO CONTACT US:

 You are welcome to contact us after school hours through the following:

Instructors:     Rolf Olson and Linda Wallenberg                          

Voice mail:              

975-4294 (Olson) & 975-4303 (Wally)

e-mails:        rolson@edenpr.org & lwallenberg@edenpr.org

 

Wally

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Olson

 

 

 rev. 2010

Advanced Placement English

S Y L L A B U S

         NOTE:    This course requires “summer reading.”  You are required to "actively read" three novels and do extensive "reading notes" as you read.  You will be given an AP exam on these three books the first week of class and write a paper at some time during the course based on some of them. 

                     The novels we usually choose from are

                           -     Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.

                           -     Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens.  REQUIRED class of 2012

                           -     Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte.

                           -      Things Fall Apart  by Chinua Achebe REQUIRED class of 2012

                           -     Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen   REQUIRED class of 2012

                           -      A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving REQUIRED class of 2012

 

  I.   Course texts    

·        A Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume 1, 6th edition, edited by M. H. Abrams, W. W. Norton and Company, 1993.

 

·        Literature:  The British Tradition (published by Prentice Hall)

 

·        English Writing and Skills (Complete Course, Coronado edition)

 

·        Beowulf (either translated by Burton Raffell or Seamus Heaney)

 

·        Grendel by John Gardner

 

·        Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (translated by R. M. Lumiansky) by Geoffrey Chaucer

 

·        Hamlet (Signet Classic edition) by William Shakespeare

 

·        Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead by Tom Stoppard

 

·        Things Fall Apart (Fawcett Crest edition) by Chinua Achebe

 

·        Heart of Darkness (A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism Series edition) by Joseph Conrad

 

·        Arcadia (Samuel French, Inc. edition) by Tom Stoppard

 

·        Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

 

·       Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

 

 

NOTE:  In addition, we would highly recommend you purchase Joseph Gibaldi’s MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, sixth edition.  It is the premiere handbook colleges use for MLA style when writing papers!

 

II.     Course content     

AP English

The following is a BANK of material from which the AP English course content will be chosen.

·        Course Introduction and Philosophy, Summer Reading, and Building a Class Foundation

 

·        Familiarization with the AP exam

-            Phrases and clauses in composition

-            Rhetorical strategies

-            Practice exams

 

·        Cultural Literacy Tidbit research paper

 

·        Poetry terminology and poems—including some classics (time permitting) from the 17th century (1625-1660) through the 20th century.

 

·        Evaluation paper:  Literary Theories paper

 

·        Anglo-Saxon and Medieval 450 AD – 1485)

-            Historical background

-            History of the English Language

-            Beowulf

-            Gardner's Grendel

-            Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales

 

·        Narrative paper:  Twenty-first Century Prologue

 

·        English Renaissance (1485 – 1625) Hamlet

 

·        Modern reaction to Hamlet Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead

 

·        Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness

 

·        Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart

 

·        Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

 

·       Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

 

·        Literary Analysis paper (comparison of two novels)

 

·        Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia

 

·        Position paper

 

·        Course final:  “Meeting of the Minds”

 

 

*******************************************************************************************

COURSE POLICIES

Grading

      

               A.     Daily work, quizzes, tests, and journals are worth 40%.

               B.      Papers/major projects are worth 60%. Papers are 70 points.  Evaluation is based on

                        content (40 points), style (10 points), and writing conventions (20 points).

               C      Grade updates are given approximately every two weeks.

 

               D.             A   = 93 - 100          C+     =     77  -  79

                                                            A-  = 90 -  92           C       =     73  -  76

                                                                                             C-      =     70  -  71

                                                            B+ = 87 -  89          

                                                            B   = 83 -  86            D+     =     67  -  69

                                                            B-  = 80 -  82            D      =      63  -  66

                                                                                             D-    =       60  -  62

 

                E.  NOTE:  This is a semester course.  The final grade for this 2 credit course comes at the very end of the course.

 

   Course Expectations

               A.    What is AP English?

                        AP English is a rigorous program designed for the high-achieving, highly-motivated college-bound student.  You can expect a course as identical to a college class as possible.  You must have mastery of writing essays, confidence in analyzing literature, commitment to hard work, and a strong desire to participate fully in a discussion-based class.  These classes will not teach you basics.  The basics of English grammar, punctuation, and organization of an essay are prerequisites.  In addition, a dedication to stretching yourself creatively is highly desired.   Designed like a college course, this class is discussion-oriented; participation is an expectation!   NOTE:  Do not expect any in-class reading, in-class research, or in-class work on homework time.

 

    Absences

               A.     Attendance must be consistent.  If you miss class, it's your responsibility to call your "study partner."  Exchange phone numbers and e-mail addresses.  Your study partner is expected to fill out a green Study Partner Absence Sheet and staple the day's handouts to it so you have all your missing work waiting for you when you return.

 

              B.  MAKE-UP POLICY

 

                        1.     Papers, major projects, the JOURNAL collection must be turned in on time even if you are absent from class the day a major assignment is due.  If you are in school but miss our class (for example:  field trip), you must still turn in your major assignments.  You must arrange to have someone else turn the major assignment in for you or it will be counted late.  Late major assignments will be deducted 10% of the total point value for each day the paper is late.  WEEKENDS count as 2 days late.  Each individual day of a school vacation counts as a day late.  This major work is due by 3:00 on the due date.  You may not e-mail papers to us.  A security copy must be turned in with every paper.

 

2.      Daily work is worth 50% if turned in late on the day the assignment is due or on the following day.  The day after that, it is worth zero.  If you are in school but miss our class (example:  field trip) on the day an assignment is due, the assignment must be turned in directly to the teacher that day or else you will be assessed a late grade. 

 

3.      If you miss a quiz or exam due to absence, you will arrange a time agreed upon by the teacher for making up this quiz or exam.  Late deductions will apply to quizzes and exams which are not made up in the English Resource Center on the date prearranged by the teacher and student.

 

4.      Buybacks (if allowed) are technical corrections on papers.  They are due by 3:00 on the due date (located on your paper grading sheet) designated by the teacher.  They will only be given 50% of the buyback credit if turned in one day late.  They will not be accepted for any credit any longer than one day late.

      

   Materials

      

               PERSONAL MATERIALS:

               A.     Highlighter (for active reading/marking handouts, books, notes) and red pen for editing.

               B.      File folder for papers and logging of paper progress (a colored one is a great idea to easily distinguish yours in a pile with all the other students' file folders!)

               C.     Your own copy of the Signet Classic edition of Hamlet   (available at our school store).  It is suggested that you purchase as many of our texts as possible for active reading and notetaking during class.  Many of these books might be read again in college courses!

               D.     Three-ring binder with dividers and loose-leaf paper for journals (not a spiral-bound notebook)

               E.     one package of 4 x 6" notecards preferably in a spiral bound format

 

Have your 15 dividers labeled this way for the first day of class (yes!  I mean it!):

 

A WHAT'S UP? (misc. stuff) and COURSE INTRO G POETRY & GARLINS M HAMLET & R&G
B

SURVIVAL PAC. & WRITING CONVENTIONS

H LITERARY THEORY N  HEART OF DARKNESS
C JOURNALS (and applicable hand-outs) I HISTORICAL BACKGROUND O  THINGS FALL APART
D VOCABULARY J BEOWULF & GRENDEL P ARCADIA
E PAPERS (hand-outs, drafts, etc.) K CHAUCER Q FRANKENSTEIN
F AP EXAM PREP L GAWAIN & THE GREEN KNIGHT R  AUSTEN & IRVING

ABOUT PAPERS (both research and analytical essays)       

               These will make up the major portion of your grade.  It is required that they are typed.  Each paper will be explained in a separate purple (usually) hand-out with a grading sheet.

               A.     FORMAT   You will receive many helpful handouts to follow proper manuscript form (msf).

                        The handouts are based on the sixth edition of the MLA Handbook.

               B.      FOR ALMOST EVERY PAPER., YOU WILL TURN IN A  WORKS CITED PAGE (BIBLIOGRAPHY)  AND/OR A CORRECTLY FORMATTED OUTLINE.

               C.     LATE PAPERS

                        As stated above in more detail, late papers will lose 10% of the total points the paper is worth for each day late. Weekends count as two days late.  Papers must be turned in the day they are due regardless if you have an excused absence.  Generally, late papers will receive little, if any, comment. 

               D.     STYLE

                        Aside from content and mechanics, you will be evaluated on “style” for every paper.  Most of the papers will be formal in nature.  The use of "I" and "we" and "you" (and their various forms) are not permitted unless specified otherwise.  In addition, colloquialisms and clichés will not be permitted.  This course will prepare you for the highest level of academic writing expected in college course.  It is expected that the essays will have solid introductions which introduce the topic in an interesting manner and include a clear thesis/controlling purpose.  A conclusion must bring the essay to closure (providing a summary of your discussion).  The language choices and Sophistication of  language, elevated use of vocabulary, and diction are expected to be at or near a "college level."  Most of the analytical essays will follow the FIVE-SECTION ESSAY STRUCTURE.

               E.      PARENTHETICAL DOCUMENTATION

                        You will always need to support your discussion with concrete examples/quotes from the text or other sources used to write your paper.  You will be expected to use parenthetical documentation to do this.  You will be loaned a style manual, called the “SURVIVAL PACKET” (based on the 6th edition of the MLA Handbook of manuscript form) for the rules. 

            F.         PLAGIARISM

                         Plagiarism will be penalized severely; paraphrased material must be cited!  You are required to print out all copies of the sources you use which are listed on your works cited page.  There will be a very specific format for this.  In addition, you are required to turn in a complete second copy of your paper, called the “SECURITY COPY,” for the teacher’s reference and to be kept on file at EPHS indefinitely.

THE JOURNAL  

               A.     There are three different types of journal entries:

                          =    assigned prompt/topic from Wally and Olson (1-2 assigned daily)

                          =    topic determined by you--but must be class-connected; assigned either every other week or as determined by teacher.

                       

               B.      LENGTH OF JOURNALS:  Each entry must be minimum of one side of a page unless determined otherwise by teacher.  This means single-spaced from 1" left margin to 1" right margin and every line filled--done in your own  handwriting. You may, of course, type your journals.  Please double-space them!

               C.     About JOURNAL DUE DATES:

                        It is expected that each journal entry is done the day teacher says it's due.  I may or may not collect it that day.  Be prepared to turn it in, however.  The purpose of the journal is to have you do some pre-thinking on the literature or topics of the day's discussion.  Often times, we will begin class with partner, trio, small group or large group sharing of journals.  The less productive discussion is, the more frequently journals will be collected.  It makes no sense to do journals on topic for today's discussion two weeks from now.  Keep up on the daily work!

D.     HOW ARE JOURNALS GRADED?  If I collect a journal on the day it's due, it's worth 5 points per full page.  You can receive 1/2 credit the next day.  After than, no points are given.  It is important, however, to do the journal for the re-collection of the entire journal later in the term

E.      SOME FINAL WORDS ON THE JOURNALS

I hope you will have fun with your journal--that you see it as a way of learning something about yourself.  Try different kinds of entries.  Be sensible sometimes, but sometimes crazy.  Invent your own ways of responding to the stories, plays, poems.  Do some additional reading about the authors or works if you wish.  Respond to class discussions (small or large group) as part of your journal.  Allow your intellect and imagination to go to work.  Remember:  our purpose is to enjoy, to feel, and to think more deeply as a result of our encounters with the literature.

EPHS ENGLISH DEP'T SURVIVAL MANUAL DOCUMENTS:

EPHS ENGLISH DEPARTMENT SURVIVAL MANUAL  (rev. 11.22.09)

To print off the entire manual half size or full size or to use the manual online in "navigational mode," go to the EPHS English department home page and click on the buttons to the left of the screen:

http://ephs.edenpr.org/index.php?option=com_qcontacts&view=category&catid=76&Itemid=123

Click HERE for the entire manual full size

or HERE for the entire manual half size.

click HERE for the COVER with table of contents  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the GRS (Grammar Rules Summary) section--yellow

click HERE for the MSF (Manuscript Formatting Rules) section--yellow

click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) SHORT FORM--pink

Buybacks (rev. 2010)!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure.    If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.  (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

CLICK HERE for the BUYBACK PACKET (rev. 2008) 

Buybacks (rev. 2010)!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

 If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.

 (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

 

SOME OTHER HELPFUL SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS:

  1. ELEMENTS OF SCREEN WRITING (originally goldenrod) CLICK HERE.

  2. Parts of Speech Review and COMMA REFRESHER PACKET (originally gray) CLICK HERE.

 

OTHER CLASSROOM MATERIALS

BLUE POETRY PACKET, click HERE!

POETRY TERMS LIST,

POETRY TONE AND MOOD WORDS,

POETRY RESPONSE SHEETS,

LITERARY THEORY PACKET,

BEOWULF PACKET,

CHAUCER PACKET, GAWAIN PACKET,

gray Frankenstein HW packet, click HERE!

 FRANKENSTEIN PACKET PART 1,

FRANKENSTEIN PACKET PART 2,

F.I.G. QUESTION PACKET 

HAMLET INTRO PACKET Click HERE to get a pdf. copy of the entire Hamlet Intro Packet.

PAPER PACKETS!!!

If you have misplaced or need to reference a paper packet, click on the link below for each paper:      

a. AP CLT Paper 

b. Lit. Theory Paper  

c. AP Lit Analysis Paper  

d.  CT Narrative Paper with Buybacks OR  CT Narrative Paper without Buybacks

e.  AP Position Paper

Here are other helpful documents:

  1. Click HERE for the Literary Time Periods Time line/Works Most Frequently Appearing on the AP Open-ended Essay.

  2. Our AP HOMEWORK PACKET  CLICK HERE:  AP HW

  3. Visit our EPHS AP Arcadia website:  http://www.edenpr.org/ephs/arcadiaweb/index.html

  4. Need to/Want to find a GREAT BOOK to read (or movie)?  Try the English Department homepage for EPHS staff favorite pics!  http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/english/favorite_books_movies.pdf  Here's another idea:  http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/english/novels_short_stories.pdf 

    See the Radcliffe list of the 100 best Eng. Language Novels of the 20th century!  http://www.cnn.com/books/news/9807/22/radcliffe.list/list.html

    Another place to find a GREAT BOOK:  See the YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association) recommended book lists for an idea for an outside reading book that TEENS recommend: http://www.ala.org/ala/yalsa/booklistsawards/booklistsbook.htm

 

 

OTHER HELPFUL LINKS:

As we develop this website, we will begin to put helpful links that would be available for our class.

Here are a few:

  1. Vocabulary building:  http://www.wordsmith.org (once you "sign up," you will receive an e-mail daily with a "word of the day" and other fun!)  OTHER GREAT WORD resources: http://www.wordsmith.org or http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/ (for vocabulary building; once you "sign up," you will receive an e-mail daily with a "word of the day" and other fun!) and http://thesaurus.reference.com/   and http://thesaurus.reference.com/features/thesaurusalphabet2005  and Wally's favorite online thesaurus: http://www.visualthesaurus.com/landing/  and for etymology work:   http://www.etymonline.com/ and for idioms: http://www.tjtaylor.net/tools-idioms-phrasal-verbs.htm

  2. COLORS!!!  https://www.advisorteam.com/temperament_sorter/register.asp (the Kiersey TEMPERAMENT SORTER which you can do online to find out what "color" (orange, gold, blue, green) you are when we do work with color groups

  3. Taylor Hartman's COLOR Code website & test http://www.thecolorcode.com/

  4. Daily Celebrations of COLORS http://www.dailycelebrations.com/092499.htm

  5. Try the "colorgenics" test! It's cool:  http://www.paulgoldinresearch.com/cg/index.htm

  6. Fun "tests" to see which characters you are most like in the works of literature we read-- http://www.selectsmart.com

  7. POETRY TERMS!  http://www.poeticbyway.com/glossary2.html  or http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88/poetic-terms.html or  http://www.k-state.edu/english/baker/english320/cc.htm  or http://ethnicity.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Terms/  or http://www.northern.edu/hastingw/terms.htm   or  http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_I.html

  8. Wally's fun poetry sites link!  CLICK HERE!

  9. Where to find cool quotes?   For ideas for quotes/sayings, try these websites:  http://www.quotegarden.com  OR http://www.quoteworld.org/browse.php  OR http://quoteland.com/ 

  10. A WEBSITE TO BUY THE CLASSICS CHEAP:  http://store.doverpublications.com/

  11. Need to/Want to find a GREAT BOOK to read (or movie)?  Try the English Department homepage for EPHS staff favorite pics!  http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/english/favorite_books_movies.pdf  Here's another idea:  http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/english/novels_short_stories.pdf 

    See the Radcliffe list of the 100 best Eng. Language Novels of the 20th century!  http://www.cnn.com/books/news/9807/22/radcliffe.list/list.html

    Another place to find a GREAT BOOK:  See the YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association) recommended book lists for an idea for an outside reading book that TEENS recommend: http://www.ala.org/ala/yalsa/booklistsawards/booklistsbook.htm 

    More ideas: http://www.mplib.org/wft/whattoread.asp  Link to the MPLS public library system teen reading program. They are broken down by categories, genres, etc.  There are student reviews.

    http://tln.lib.mi.us/~amutch/jen/.   *This is a good list for more unusual or non-mainstream books

    http://www.district196.org/avhs/services/media/index2.htm   Ms. Fullmer, one of our 9th grade English teachers, did a lot of work on the book review section at Apple Valley High school.  Check it out!   There are TONS of links, lists, and reviews.

    http://www.amazon.com*click on BOOKS.  Click on CHILDREN’S BOOKS.  Click on TEENS.  Then just browse the categories on the left.

     http://www.hclib.org/  EP public library

  12. SHAKESPEARE RESEARCH TOPICS SUGGESTED WEBSITES

  13. FREE download for MANY, not all, famous works of literature. These are not professional readers, but they are still quite usable.

    http://librivox.org/newcatalog/

    For some fun youtube Shakespeare video links, click HERE.

    You Tube Shakespeare LINKS to check out:

    For the reduced Shakespeare company's rendition of R&J part 1, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzVyqiskpMk&mode=related&search=

    For the reduced Shakespeare company's rendition of R&J part 2, click (starts with balcony scene) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKUyq-uCZr0&mode=related&search=

    For a fun video with Rowan Atkinson and Hugh Laurie spoofing Shakesepare and "To be or not to be," click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwbB6B0cQs4

    For a spoof on Shakespeare's life, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OY4HdGJcJVo

    To see a Shakespeare in Love music video set to "If you're not the one" Daniel Bedingfield, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l40Syu0sKYM

Welcome to the AP Class of 2011!

AP 2011 SUMMER READING

Why "summer reading"?  Our experience with A. P. English exams over the years has shown us that Eden Prairie students need, quite frankly, to read more from what is known as the "canon" (those established works considered by many the "great literature" of the ages).  Moreover, serious students simply need to spend more time reading.   Becoming more widely read in great literature is one of the best ways to expand your vocabulary as well.  You will also widen your view of the world through the vicarious experiences you receive from literature.  Furthermore, you will enhance your critical skills and develop your own personal response to and appreciation of the literature you read. 

So, we require all AP English students to read FOUR novels:  one modern novel and two literary classics.  With the college application process in full swing in the fall plus the academic and extra-curricular demands on your time, we strongly urge you NOT to put off the reading of these books until after school starts.

 This reading must be done BEFORE the first day of third term senior year. 

Your FOUR required texts are:

·        A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving

·        Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

·        Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens   

·   Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

You will need to purchase your own copies at a local bookstore so you can "actively read" the texts.  Many college professors require evidence of "active reading" in texts.  This means making personal notes in the margins of your books. 

So, you must "actively" read the two texts AND take separate "reading notes" which might include some or all of the following:  recording questions, making connections, looking for symbols, tracking plot structure and character development, as well as identifying major themes in the texts.  Expect that your first AP practice essay exams the first week of class will be based on the three novels you readLater in the term you will write a paper based on these texts, so it will be invaluable for you to later have the active reading and reading notes to refresh you memory.  

Happy Reading!  

  YOUR FIRST AP ENGLISH ASSIGNMENT

“Actively read” and take “reading notes” on the  FOUR novels BEFORE the first day of third term senior year. 

What is “Active Reading”?

 Goal of Active Reading: To own what you read.

 Objectives:

Ø      To have ideas and opinions about a reading;

Ø      To retrieve information quickly;

Ø      To organize information from the reading;

Ø      To increase comprehension, vocabulary, analytical and evaluation skills, links with what a reader already knows, long term memory;

Ø      To improve working knowledge of the literal aspects of a work;

Ø      To allow readers to deepen original ideas;

Ø      To help the reader inductively discover the meaning of a work and to have stated it in his own words;

Ø      To find the purpose the author had in writing the work;

Ø      To provide ideas and questions for class discussion;

Ø      To have a conversation with an author

Ø      To think as one reads

HERE’S HOW (IN GENERAL)

Generally, for Active Reading of passages, highlight, box, star, code, translate, paraphrase, summarize over or beside lines, sentences, and passages. On pages, write notes in margins, on bottoms, tops, or in corners and/or add post it notes to accommodate reader’s notes. On end flaps, create titled lists and categories of information and collect information under these categories with quoted, key words from passages and the page # next to the quoted word (fuller notes will be on the entire quote in the reading)

 

HERE’S HOW (IN MORE DETAIL)

Analyze, evaluate, speculate about the title before beginning to read and then come back to the title after reading and summarize its relevance – always write a sentence or so explaining its relevance to the theme or thesis of the story/article;

o        Examine chapter or section titles or headings before, during, and after reading;

o        Identify and comment on the narration – 1st or 3rd person, why? Omniscient, dramatic, participating – why? Present tense? Past tense? Why? Formal or informal? Educated or not – why? Keep a section in the front of the book to add to a growing understanding of the narration, point of view, tone, and mood of the piece. Decide and write the author’s purpose for this narrative choice.

o        Analyze the narrator as a character, even in nonfiction works – decide and comment on why he is reliable and unreliable.

 

o        Highlight or underline important ideas;

o        Write parallel lines to the side of passages too long to highlight but which need emphasis;

o        Star ideas of utmost importance;

o        Circle and define unfamiliar vocabulary words or ones with archaic or unusual meanings;

o        Cycle, box, or color-code with a highlighter groups or series of words that work together to develop an image, motif, theme, character, main idea, or some other element.

o        Place post it notes as markers at the edge of the page with a note as to the significance of that page;

o        Write analytical notes, paraphrases, ideas in the margins that will help the reader remember thoughts about the content of the page;

o        Place a post it note on the page to write summaries, paraphrases, comments, analyses that will not fit in the margins;

o        Write key words that identify a symbol, image, or other important idea in the

upper outside corner of pages so that when the reader flips through the book, he easily sees what significant idea, etc, is on the page and which has been thoroughly noted in the text of the page;

o        Color code various elements of fiction, tropes, images – what ever needs to be identified, collected, and traced throughout the book and then create a legend on the front flap of the book;

o        Start cross-referenced lists on the front and back pages (or add larger post-it notes) – wherever there is space that list characters names, themes, images, metaphors, symbols, etc. For each, quote a key word and write the page number next to it. Cross-reference by highlighting the information on the actual page of text with more in-depth comments, etc.

o        Cross reference images, motifs, recurring important ideas, etc. Start a list on an end flap that gives a title to the group, e.g., “Christian Imagery” pp. 6,9, 15, 80, 210, etc. On each page highlight and comment on the example itself.

o        Comment in the margins – react personally, agree, disagree, compare or contrast to previous knowledge/ another book / ideas;

o        Write questions about what is not understood

o        Predict what might happen;

o        Speculate – “What if the character had done…?” “What if the writer had been [different in some way]?”

o        Identify, highlight, and comment on all explicit and implicit references to the themes or theses of the writing.

o        Paraphrase all confusing poetic sentences, prose sentences, or passages.

o        Summarize (always in your own words) paragraphs, passages, sections, chapters, etc., to make sure the text is really understood;

o        Fold pages in certain ways to code important parts of the book –

HERE ARE SOME REMINDERS

Ø      Highlight sparingly – coloring the entire reading does not help important information to stand out;

Ø      Cross reference – use end flaps to gather numerous page numbers with examples of the same technique or idea

Ø      Create individual coding systems that work for the reader

Ø      Remind oneself that active reading is a reader’s dialogue with the author;

Ø      Standardize where various kinds of notes appear (bottom right, top right, etc.) so that a reader can easily retrieve information of a certain kind, i.e., plot summaries are under chapter headings or references to a character’s personality are at the bottom right of pages or highlighted in yellow, etc.

Ø      Outlines, summaries, paraphrases are in the reader’s own words.

For more information on Active Reading, you may want to read Mortimer J. Adler’s essay “How To Mark A Book.” From The Saturday Review of Literature, July 6, 1940, pp. 11-12 Copyright 1940, The Sat. Review Co., Inc.; renewed 1967 Sat. Review, Inc.

 Your first writing assignment (This is due the very first day of class!):

Do JOURNAL ENTRY #1:  QUOTE PONDERING

Because this is a course which relies heavily on your input and willingness to jump into discussion, let's start with your personal reaction to one of the following quotations.  Choose the quote below that strikes/interests you most.  Discuss what you think the quotation means literally, what it might say about society, and what personal connections you might draw from your own experiences with reading or in your own life.  Finally, it is expected that you use any applicable/relevant examples that come to mind from the three summer reading texts to exemplify the main points you are making in your discussion.  Before you start, be sure to read the suggested questions/ideas for consideration listed further down below the quotes.

This journal entry must be at least two double-spaced typed pages (or two single-spaced pages of notebook paper).   We highly recommend your typing your journals.  Start a file for them on your computer.

PART ONE OF JOURNAL #1 (one side):  CHOOSE ONE OF THESE REQUIRED QUOTES:

QUOTE 1:           

                The whole point of literature is to have sympathies, imaginative relationships with people who are different from one’s self.  --Irving Howe         

FURTHER IDEAS TO PONDER WHEN WRITING ABOUT THIS QUOTE:

"The whole point"--really?  What other points might there be?  What books have touched you, made you feel empathy, changed you?  Were they usually books assigned in school or those you read at home?  What differences were there between you and the characters whose stories most affected you?  Were the two of you, in retrospect, more alike than different? 

QUOTE 2:           

                When Power leads man towards arrogance, literature reminds him of his limitations.  When Power narrows the area of man’s concern, literature reminds him of his richness and diversity of existence.  When Power corrupts, literature cleanses.               --John F. Kennedy

FURTHER IDEAS TO PONDER WHEN WRITING ABOUT THIS QUOTE:

Why "arrogance"?  why "corrupts"? why "cleanses"?  what connotations/possibilities are there?  Did the fact that Kennedy wrote this quote have any impact on you?  Negatively?  Positively? 

QUOTE 3:           

                [ . . . ] the universe focuses those who live in it to understand it.  Those creatures who find everyday experience a muddled jumble of events with no predictability, no regularity, are in grave peril.  The universe belongs to those who, at least to some degree, have figured it out.                              --Carl Sagan         

FURTHER IDEAS TO PONDER WHEN WRITING ABOUT THIS QUOTE:

The "universe"?   why "creatures"?  why "grave peril"?   why  "belongs"?

QUOTE 4:           

                On this day he (the Virginian) was bidding her farewell before undertaking the most important trust which Judge Henry had yet given him.  For this journey she had provided him with Sir Walter Scott’s Kenilworth.  Shakespeare he had returned to her.  He had bought Shakespeare for himself.  “As soon as I got used to readin’ it,” he had told her, “I knowed for certain that I liked readin’ for enjoyment.”       --Owen Wister

FURTHER IDEAS TO PONDER WHEN WRITING ABOUT THIS QUOTE:

Why the incorrect grammar?  How did that color your impressions of him? Why did he buy Shakespeare?  For enjoyment?

QUOTE 5:           

                Readers may be divided into four classes:

                1.             Sponges, who absorb all they read and return it nearly in the same state, only a little dirtied.

                2.             Sand-glasses, who retain nothing and are content to get through a book for the sake of getting through the time.

                3.             Strain-bags, who retain merely the drags of what they read.

                4.             Mogul diamonds, equally rare and valuable, who profit by what they read, and enable others to

profit by it also.                                                                                                                   --Samuel Taylor Coleridge

FURTHER IDEAS TO PONDER WHEN WRITING ABOUT THIS QUOTE:

Why "a little dirtied"?  connotations of "strain-bags" and "drags"?  Mogul diamonds?  Why "mogul"?

PART TWO OF JOURNAL #1 (one additional side):  YOUR ALL-TIME FAVORITE QUOTES

After you have completed your discussion on one of the required quotes, continue the journal with a list of three of your all-time favorite quotes.  Say something about why you chose each of them.  Maybe you want to share why they are meaningful to you, how they apply to your life, and/or how you ran across them.

*   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *

Note!  PLEASE SEND US YOUR CURRENT E-MAIL ASAP SO WE HAVE YOURS RECORDED CORRECTLY.   If your e-mail should change between now and January next year, you MUST inform us.  We will be communicating periodically with you via e-mail.  For example, we have some field trips planned for next year, and we will be needing to collect money even before you actually begin the course with us.  Here's how to contact us:  Wally's e-mail lwallenberg@edenpr.org  or voice mail 952 975-4303 or Olson's e-mail Rolson@edenpr.org or voice mail 952 975-4294.

Also,  be sure to visit our AP website for updates, etc.  Our AP website is updated daily and contains many, many important documents for the class. 

Here is the URL for this AP HOME PAGE:     http://teachers.edenpr.org/~lwallenberg/APlitmasterfolder/index.htm