HOW TO REACH US:  voice mails:  Wally 975-4303 or Olson 975-4294

    e-mails:   Lwallenberg@edenpr.org or Rolson@edenpr.org  

 

 AP LIT. DAILY ASSIGNMENTS

  (UPDATED 3-3-10)  

 

NOTE:  to quickly go to the assignment you are doing, use the list of links below:

 

ASSIGNMENTS:

 

Course Intro:  A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V  | W | X | Y | Z

 

AP. LIT 2009 new Seamus Heaney Beowulf:  SH-B1 | SH-B2 | SH-B3 | SH-B4 | SH-B5 SH-B6 | SH-B7 | SH-B8 | SH-B9

 

Sir Gawain & the Green Knight: G1 | G2 | G3

 

Chaucer: C1 | C2 | C3 | C4 | C5C6 | C7 | C8 | C9 | C10 | C11 | C12 | C13  

 

NEW, IMPROVED Frankenstein (as of 1-5-08):   F1  |  F2  | F3  |  F4  |  F5  |  F6  |  F7  |  F8  |  F9  |  F10  | F11

 

Hamlet:  H1 | H2 | H3 | H4 | H5H6 | H7 | H8 | H9 | H10-A | H10-B | H11 | H12-A | H12-B | H13 | H14 | H15 | H16 | H17

 

 

Opening Assignment: QUOTE ANALYSIS

Due date ________________

 

1.       Do OJ#1 (NOT a WA#1 as stated previously): “QUOTE PONDERING”/MY FAVORITE QUOTES   (7 points)

(The front side is 5 points if you fill a minimum of one side of a page.)

 

A.      Begin the front side of the journal--the "Quote Pondering" part  (5 pts.).

Read the quotes below.  Choose the one that strikes/interests you the most.  In this part of the journal, you are respond to this quotation.  Think about what you think the quotation means literally, what it might say about society, and finally what personal connections you might draw from your own experiences.  Before you start, be sure to read the suggested questions/ideas for consideration listed further down below the quotes.

 Include all of these in your discussion:

a.        paraphrase of the quote

b.        what it means to you personally--an anecdotal connection

c.        any larger societal connections

d.        anything you'd like to say based on the questions that follow each quote

 

HERE ARE THE QUOTES:

 

 A        The whole point of literature is to have sympathies, imaginative relationships with people who are different from ones self. --Irving Howe

 

 FURTHER IDEAS TO CONSIDER WHEN WRITING ABOUT THIS HOWE QUOTE

Howe quote--"the whole point"--really?  What other points might there be?  What books have touched you, made you feel empathy, changed you?  Were they usually books assigned in school or those you read at home?  What differences were there between you and the characters whose stories most affected you?  Were the two of you, in retrospect, more alike than different? 

 

 

 B        When Power leads man towards arrogance, literature reminds him of his limitations.  When Power narrows the area of man’s concern, literature reminds him of his richness and diversity of existence.  When Power corrupts, literature cleanses.  --John F. Kennedy

 

 FURTHER IDEAS TO CONSIDER WHEN WRITING ABOUT THIS KENNEDY QUOTE

Kennedy quote--why "arrogance"?  why "corrupts"? why "cleanses"?  what connotations/possibilities are there?  Did the fact that Kennedy wrote this quote have any impact on you?  Negatively?  Positively? 

 


 

 C         [ . . . ] the universe focuses those who live in it to understand it.  Those creatures who find everyday experience a muddled jumble of events with no predictability, no regularity, are in grave peril.  The universe belongs to those who, at least to some degree, have figured it out.               --Carl Sagan

 

 FURTHER IDEAS TO CONSIDER WHEN WRITING ABOUT THIS SAGAN QUOTE

Sagan quote--the "universe"?   why "creatures"?  why "grave peril"?   why  "belongs"?

 

 

 D        On this day he (the Virginian) was bidding her farewell before undertaking the most important trust which Judge Henry had yet given him.  For this journey she had provided him with Sir Walter Scott’s Kenilworth.  Shakespeare he had returned to her.  He had bought Shakespeare for himself.  “As soon as I got used to readin’ it,” he had told her, “I knowed for certain that I liked readin’ for enjoyment.”

                                                                                                                                                --Owen Wister

 FURTHER IDEAS TO CONSIDER WHEN WRITING ABOUT THIS WISTER QUOTE

 Wister quote--why the incorrect grammar?  How did that color your impressions of him?  Why did he buy Shakespeare?  enjoyment?

 

 

 E        Readers may be divided into four classes:

1.                  Sponges, who absorb all they read and return it nearly in the same state, only a little dirtied.

2.                  Sand-glasses, who retain nothing and are content to get through a book for the sake of getting through the time.

3.                  Strain-bags, who retain merely the drags of what they read.

4.                  Mogul diamonds, equally rare and valuable, who profit by what they read, and enable others to profit by it also.                                                                                             --Samuel Taylor Coleridge

 FURTHER IDEAS TO CONSIDER WHEN WRITING ABOUT THIS COLERIDGE QUOTE

Coleridge quote--why "a little dirtied"?  connotations of "strain-bags" and "drags"?  Mogul diamonds? Why "mogul"?

 

 

 

B.     Continue on the back side of OJ#1 (2 pts.)  with jotting down some of your all-time favorite quotes.  Underneath each of your favorites, be sure to mention why they are meaningful to you and/or how you ran across them.  There are some great quote sites online!

 HINT:

There are some great quote sites online! 

A few are www.quoteland.com and www.quotationspage.com.   If you have any other online quote sites, bring in the web addresses to share with the class.  Jot them down on the back of WA #1.

 

 


 

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 Assignment A:  Getting Started – WELCOME!

Due date ________________   (Yes, tomorrow!  Yes, everything listed!)

1.       Actively* read the following:

*Whenever I refer to "active reading," I expect that you will highlight, underline, and otherwise mark the parts that strike you, make you say, "Hmm," parts that you'd like to ask about, parts you like, etc.  However, if the articles must be returned to the teacher (such as the articles listed below) please make your active reading notes on a separate sheet of paper.

 

 a.   my green "letter of welcome"  and  the entire course syllabus

 b.   the letter of advice from a student who took this class last year

 

2.      Then do journal entry  WA2 “First Impressions”

 Remember:  All journal entries (WA's, CC's, and PR's) must be typically a minimum of 1 full page--single-spaced if hand-written, double-spaced if typed--for  5 points !

 Always start a new sheet of paper for each new journal (WA)!

•For WA 2 "First Impressions," a minimum of 2 full sides of a page of your reaction/musings/questions to each of the items on the list below is REQUIRED (worth 10 pts).

 

•Devote the amount of discussion on each of the following as you see fit--as long as you have at least two sides by the time you're done  and  you have addressed each of the following topics (a-f).  Never let the page minimums inhibit you!  You may, of course, write as much as you want!

 

•Please mark each topic clearly on your page as you begin to address it so the teacher knows exactly what topic you are on. 

 

Label the first topic "topic A," etc.

 

 HERE ARE THE 6 REQUIRED TOPICS YOU MUST ADDRESS IN WA2 :

 topic A  your response/reaction our  first day of class

topic B  your response/reaction to our  summer reading requirement

 topic C  reaction to the  course syllabus & our green “welcome” letter

 topic D  reaction to the  letters of advice  from last year's AP student

 topic E  your thoughts about the notion of going out  “with all flags flying”?

Think about the class, the senior year you've already had, your motivations last year for signing up for this advanced class, the rumors you’ve heard, and reflect on the phrase, “Why not go out with all flags flying?”  Think about your own definition of what it means to go out with all your “flags flying.”  In other words, what are your goals for the rest of the year (and your last term of free education)?  After thinking about all of this, jot down your ideas on what it means to you to go out  “with all flags flying”?

 

 topic F  Write down 1 – 3 “educational paradigms” that you wish you would rather not have learned, put up with, survived in spite of, and otherwise wished never existed.  We'll call these "Educational Baggage."  These can be minor or major.  The bottom line is that you have acknowledged their existence and would rather have done without them.  For each one, please explain why you wrote them down.  Limit yourself to no more than 3!

 Oh, yes!  There’s more to this journal à

 

 topic G :  WRITE 5 SPECIFIC GOALS FOR THIS TERM

•3 goals must be for this class--one connected to learning about the literature, one to writing, and one to class management/performance

•2 goals--either personal or academic OUTSIDE OF THIS CLASS

 

 

 

3.      Fill out the “Word of the Day” vocab sheet for the 4 words assigned to you plus 4 of your absolute favorite "college level" words.  These should be words that you think everyone in this class ought to know and which would come in handy for college work and reading.

NOTE:  YOU WILL DEFINE 8 WORDS ALL TOGETHER.

 Hint:  For full credit, make sure you fill out everything called for on the vocab. slip.  If you don't know what "etymology" is, look it up.  Most dictionaries explain "etymology" and how to read a word's etymology somewhere in the dictionary.

 

 Another hint:  for those of you who love words and would like to increase your vocabulary relatively painlessly before college.  Check out "A Word A Day"at <http://www.wordsmith.org>.  It's free to subscribe to this cool site which automatically sends you a new word every day, its pronunciation, its etymology, and its use in a sentence!  You also get a "Quote of the Day" with it!

 

 

4.      If given out, fill out the entire front of the pink English Dept. Info Sheet.  Complete at least 5 items on the back.

 

 

5.      Bring a file folder to class by the end of the week.  A colored one is preferable!

 

6.  Design your "square" incorporating one of your favorite quotes from OJ#1--attach fav. photos, artwork, color, designs, etc.  Also, put ONE of the two quotes from your WA#1 Reflections (the one we did in class today) on this square.  Also, be sure to write your name in large letters on the square.  Make this uniquely "you"!  (Due Friday)  We will put these up on the wall in Wally's classroom (269).
 

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Assignment B:  Universal Questions and your first AP Multiple Choice Exam

 

 

 

1.     OJ 2:  UNIVERSAL QUESTIONS    (at least one side = 5 pts.)

Using the hand-out provided in class, choose 1-3 (or more) of the “universal questions” to reflect on in terms of your own values and belief about life.  Be sure to provide anecdotes/examples from your life to make the discussion even more meaningful!

 

2.     Your first AP Multiple Choice Exam

 

Remember!  Do not spend more than 60 min. on the exam!

Write your answers on a sheet of notebook paper.  Do not use any resources.  You should guess rather than leaving an answer blank for this practice test only.  Do NOT do the ESSAY QUESTION on the last page!  If you need a copy of the test, click HERE.

Follow the instructions given in class (if we wrote any down):

 

3.  WA 3 "Stay Hungry!  Be Foolish!" (5 pts or 1 side min.) Read Steve Jobs' Stanford Commencement Address--"Stay Hungry!  Be Foolish!"  For a copy of this address, click HERE.  Choose one or more of his four topics: Connecting the dots, . Love and Loss, Death, or the overall "Stay Hungry!  Be Foolish" idea.  How do Jobs' topics resonates with you?  What messages in the grad. address make sense to you, connect to your life, etc.? Is this guy out to lunch? If you were to sit down with him and converse about the address, what would you ask him? What would you share with him about how this all relates to you?

If you would like to see Jobs actually delivering part of the address, go to:   http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2005/june15/grad-061505.html

HEADS UP!  Tomorrow night, you will be exchanging this journal with another classmate's.  You will respond in the margins to his/her thoughts on the topics in Jobs' speech.

 

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 ASSIGNMENT C:  SOME CONTROVERSIAL ARTICLES

Due date ________________

 

You will now do journal entry 

 

WA___ or OJ  ____  ZEN and other CONTROVERSIAL ARTICLES

For a pdf. copy of ALL of these articles, click HERE.

For this assignment, you will read LOTS.  Practice the "fine art" of skim reading.  Get used to volumes of reading in this class--similar to the amount expected each night in a college course.  For the most part, you may choose to focus in on what ever is of interest to you personally in the required articles. 

Remember this phrase:  "take what you like, and leave the rest."  I mean it!

 

 Remember  All journal entries must be typically a minimum of 1 full page--single-spaced if hand-written, double-spaced

 if typed--for 5 points, BUT THIS ONE MUST BE AT LEAST 2 SIDES!  So, it is worth 10 points.

Devote about the same amount of discussion on each of the three required topics.

 

Here's a diagram of the “set-up” of your WA3:

 

A.  Response to "Zen"

B.  Response to articles on "rewards" (Chap. 1 in Kohn, Ruenzel article, and maybe second assigned Kohn chapter)

C.  Response to your “potluck” articles

 

THE SETS OF ARTICLES:

1.        REQUIRED FOR EVERYONE                 •"Zen and the Art of Grade Motivation"   by Liz Mandrell

 

2.        REQUIRED FOR EVERYONE                 •Preface and Chap. 1 in Punished by Rewards by Alfie Kohn

  and

•"Gold Star Junkies" by David Ruenzel

  and

•MAYBE (if teacher assigns) a second chapter which your small group was assigned from Kohn's book  (Make sure you label clearly the name of the chapter and then what you thought of it.)

 

3.        POT LUCK!  CHOOSE SEVERAL OTHER ARTICLES TO READ:

The rest of the packet is filled with interesting articles about controversial topics.  Look through the packet for at least two other articles of interest to you.  Read them, and jot down your thoughts.  Make sure you include the name of the article in your discussion so that I know what you are reacting to!


 

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 ASSIGNMENT D:  COMMA DIAGNOSTIC and COLORS

Due date ________________

 

1.       Comma Diagnostic Pretest!  UGH!

Use  Comma Pretest  and  scanner sheet  to complete the Diagnostic Comma Pretest.

 

Do not bend, fold, punch, or mutilate the scanner sheet.   Put your name and answers on the scanner ONLY.

 Do not write on the test. 

 

Do not consult and grammar books, grammarians, friends, or college graduates to take this pretest.  It is only used to see what comma work needs attention.  You will get 5 points for doing this--no matter what your "score."

 

I just want to see what you know (or do not know) about commas before we begin to review them.

 

 

2.     WHAT’S YOUR COLOR and LEARNING STYLE?

  1. Take the two  PINK  color group inventories (the shorter pink one); the Kiersey (the longer pink one, which can also be done online at < https://www.advisorteam.com/temperament_sorter/register.asp>.   It’s called the TEMPERAMENT SORTER.  Print out the FREE mini-report, and bring it to class tomorrow.  If you do the Kiersey online, here is how your results translate to colors:  Artisans = Orange, Guardians = Gold, Idealists = Blue, and Rationals = Green
  2. Take the IVORY color group inventory--from Hartman's book, COLOR CODE)
  3. Take the WHITE GREGORC Learning Styles inventory.

 NOTE:  Be prepared tomorrow to tell me your color from the pink inventories (orange, gold, blue, green)

 and  the Hartman code (yellow, red, blue, white)

 and  your learning style  (abstract sequential (AS), concrete sequential (CS), abstract random (AR), or concrete random (CR)). 


 

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 ASSIGNMENT E:  HERE COMES THE CLT PAPER

Due date ________________

 

1.      Read several articles (yellow—reprinted on the last pages of the CLT paper packet) about E.D. Hirsch and his thoughts on “CULTURAL LITERACY.”    

What do you think about the importance of promoting "cultural literacy"?  Are there, indeed, as Hirsch asserts things that "every American should know"?  If so, what?  Why?  Or has Hirsch gone off the "deep end"?

 

 E.D. HIRSCH’S IDEAS ON “CULTURAL LITERACY”

 WHAT IS YOUR REACTION?

 

 

 

2.      Now it's time to start thinking about the first research paper.   Actively read  the purple packet outlining requirements for your first paper.  It's called the

" CLT PAPER"   or the    "Cultural Literacy Tidbit Research Paper."

 

Come prepared with questions tomorrow.  If you didn't get your topic today, you will be assigned a "tidbit" of cultural literacy tomorrow.  Your topic will be something we will talk about at some time during this term.  You are to research the topic, become the "expert" on it for our class and do the paper according to the purple packet's requirements.

 

3.      When you are done ACTIVELY reading through the assignment  and  the accompanying grading sheet, let's see how much you understood.  Take the  CLT paper quiz  included in the CLT paper packet.

 

4.      If you can, get on the Internet, go to a library, or talk to someone you consider to be "culturally literate" about your topic.  START THE RESEARCH NOW!   The paper will be due in about 2 weeks.

 

Jot any questions down here (so you don’t forget to ask!) about your topic or the paper requirements

 

 

 

 

5.        While at the library or at home, start looking for a "hard copy" (not a video)  of a fairy (or "folk") tale.  Stay away from the commonly known tales such as Snow White and Cinderella if there is not some VERY SPECIAL reason you want to use that "everyone knows that story" tale.  You will eventually use this folk tale for a paper applying a literary theory.


 

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 ASSIGNMENT F:  COMMA DIAGNOSTIC RETAKE & WRITING ADVICE

Due date ________________

 

1.       Retake Comma Diagnostic Pretest

Use  Comma Pretest  and  scanner sheet  to look over and correct the ones you got wrong.

 

Use the comma materials your teacher has given you if you need to look up the rules:  

·         the gray grammar text English Writing Skills (pp. 551-563)

·         the gray comma review packet

·         the neon orange section on commas in the Survival Packet.

 

Erase completely your wrong answers, and try again.

 

I will put them through the machine again under the "rescore" feature. 

 

 NOTE:  This time your actual score on the RETAKE will count for a grade

(Daily Work points—out of 25).

 

 

 

2.      Do  notes on “WRITING ADVICE” from Dave Barry, Stephen Wilbers, and Patricia O’ Connor

 

This is a particularly critical time for you to heed this information as you continue to improve your writing with the end result being a near-college level paper! 

For this assignment, you will read some articles on effective writing:

 

·          from Dave Barry’s article “What Is and Isn’t Grammatical”

 

·          from Stephen Wilbers’ columns

Every week Wilbers' columns appear in the Business section of the StarTribune.  Although his articles are directed towards business professionals, he has a lot of valuable advice and information to pass on to us.  I think it is interesting that it is such a popular column and that it reinforces so much of what is taught in our class about effective writing. 

By the way, most of Wilbers' columns (as well as a tremendous amount of other grammatical and writing tips) are available at his personal Web page at         <http://www.wilbers.com> .   Another great site for help with writing papers is <http://nutsandbolts.washcoll.edu> .  Check these out!

 and

·          from Patricia T. O’Conner’s Woe is I

 

HOW THE NOTES SHOULD BE WRITTEN (for full credit):


 

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 ASSIGNMENT G:  TIME TO REVIEW MLA FORMAT, ETC.

Due date ________________

 

You will now begin to review what you learned last year about writing a research paper using the text, Writing Research Papers Across the Curriculum (WRPAC), and our SURVIVAL PACKET

 

Your group will be given an assigned topic from the list below (A-F).  Once the teacher has given you your letter, circle the assignment that is yours.   (IF YOU WERE ABSENT OR DID NOT GET AN ASSIGNED

LETTER,  YOU MAY CHOOSE ANY ONE (A-F) TO USE.)

 

 For example , let's say you took notes on the yellow msf sheet in our SURVIVAL PACKET.  You wrote in your notes that all numbers that can be said in one or two words must be written out.  You might, then, write up this question:  "In a formal paper, what is the proper way to write up the number 189?   (The answer is in numerals because it takes three words to say this number.)

 

The reason for the questions is that you will be sharing and comparing this info to your other group members and then "teaching" this material to the rest of the class.  Do a good job on your notes so that the other group members will not feel they have to go back and read the material for themselves

 

Here are the SPECIFIC GROUP assignments

 

 GROUP A = ___________________:  STYLE/GRAMMAR/MSF

                                color

 

Read the following material and take careful notes on the most important, but often forgot, material as well as what you never knew before.  You will need to share this info. with the entire class.  To determine what to write down, ask this question:  "What must everyone know that he or she wouldn't know if I didn't share this information?"

 

Here are your group A assigned readings:

(HINT:  THIS IS A HUGE SECTION!  SKIM IT!  Jot down the rules that you really think most people wouldn't know or forget easily.)

NOTE:  take special note of the formatting of a first page of a paper (see MSF page 6)

http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/media/correct_manuscript_2006.pdf

 

When you are done, write down at least 5 questions (getting at the 5 most important pieces of information) on this material and  their answers.


 

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GROUP B = ___________________:  WORKS CITED

                                      color

 

Read the following material and take careful notes on the most important, but often forgot, material as well as what you never knew before.  You will need to share this info. with the entire class.  To determine what to write down, ask this question:  "What must everyone know that he or she wouldn't know if I didn't share this information?"

Here are your group B assigned readings:

 

"How to and How Not to Incorporate Your Evidence into Your Paper" pp. 161-166; 178-180 and "List of Works Cited" pp. 208-223.

 and  

o         "WORKS CITED/BIBLIOGRAPHY MSF" (yellow)

o        "FIRST PAGE OF A LIST OF WORKS CITED" (yellow MSF page 6 in the front of the Survival Packet) NOTE:  take special note of the formatting of a Works Cited page!!!

http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/media/works_cited2005.pdf

 

 

When you are done, write down at least 5 questions (getting at the 5 most important pieces of information) on this material and  their answers.

 

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GROUP C = ___________________:  HOW TO INCORPORATE

                              color                                      EVIDENCE: ACKNOWLEDGING CREDENTIALS AND PARENTHETICAL DOCUMENTATION

           

Read the following material and take careful notes on the most important, but often forgot, material as well as what you never knew before.  You will need to share this info. with the entire class.  To determine what to write down, ask this question:  "What must everyone know that he or she wouldn't know if I didn't share this information?"

 

            Here are your group C assigned readings:

 

 and  "Humanities Systems:  The MLA Style [for Parenthetical Documentation]" pp. 202-208

 

When you are done, write down at least 5 questions (getting at the 5 most important pieces of information) on this material and  their answers.


 

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GROUP D = ___________________:  USING DIRECT QUOTES   

                              color                        

 

Read the following material and take careful notes on the most important, but often forgot, material as well as what you never knew before.  You will need to share this info. with the entire class.  To determine what to write down, ask this question:  "What must everyone know that he or she wouldn't know if I didn't share this information?"

 

Here are your group D assigned readings:

 

"Using Direct Quotations Properly" pp. 183-192

                                                     

When you are done, write down at least 5 questions (getting at the 5 most important pieces of information) on this material and  their answers.

 

 

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GROUP E = ___________________:  ELECTRONIC SOURCES

                              color

 

Read the following material regarding electronic sources/Internet.  Take careful notes on the most important, but often forgot, material as well as what you never knew before.  You will need to share this info. with the entire class.  To determine what to write down, ask this question:  "What must everyone know that he or she wouldn't know if I didn't share this information?"

 

Here are your group E assigned readings:

 

·        these two pink articles from the  SURVIVAL PACKET:

"Oh, What a Tangled Web We've Woven!  Helping Students Sources"

 and

"College Plagiarists Get Caught in the Web."

·        also from the  SURVIVAL PACKET:

"MLA FORMAT: Citing Electronic Sources" (pp. E1-E6 pink section)

http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/media/MLA_format.pdf

 

 

When you are done, write down at least 5 questions (getting at the 5 most important pieces of information) on this material and  their answers.

 

 

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GROUP F = ___________________:  STYLE/GRAMMAR/MSF

 (same assignment as Group A)     color

 

Read the following material and take careful notes on the most important, but often forgot, material as well as what you never knew before.  You will need to share this info. with the entire class.  To determine what to write down, ask this question:  "What must everyone know that he or she wouldn't know if I didn't share this information?"

 

Here are your group A assigned readings:

NOTE:  take special note of the formatting of a first page of a paper (see MSF page 6)

http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/media/correct_manuscript_2006.pdf

 

 

When you are done, write down at least 5 questions (getting at the 5 most important pieces of information) on this material and  their answers.

 


 

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GROUP G = ___________________:  WORKS CITED

                                      color

 

Read the following material and take careful notes on the most important, but often forgot, material as well as what you never knew before.  You will need to share this info. with the entire class.  To determine what to write down, ask this question:  "What must everyone know that he or she wouldn't know if I didn't share this information?"

Here are your group G assigned readings:

 

"How to and How Not to Incorporate Your Evidence into Your Paper" pp. 161-166; 178-180 and "List of Works Cited" pp. 208-223.

 and  

o         "WORKS CITED/BIBLIOGRAPHY MSF" (yellow)

o        "FIRST PAGE OF A LIST OF WORKS CITED" (yellow MSF page 6 in the front of the Survival Packet) NOTE:  take special note of the formatting of a Works Cited page!!!

http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/media/works_cited2005.pdf

 

 

When you are done, write down at least 5 questions (getting at the 5 most important pieces of information) on this material and  their answers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Assignment H:  WALLY’S WILD WORKS CITED FIX-IT ASSIGNMENT AND SPECIAL JOURNALS:  PR’S and CC’s

Due date ________________

 

1.       WORKS CITED FIX-IT ASSIGNMENT

You have been given a list of sources that might appear on a works cited page in your paper.  Your job is to make an accurate works cited page of these sources—just like you will have to do for your papers in this class.

Use these three resources:

 

 

2.      Soon, you will be asked to do two new kinds of journals.

When it is time to do these, I will have you read the information about each of them below.

a.      PEER RESPONSE JOURNAL (PR)

This must be typed (double-spaced) and NOT signed.  (I'll give you a  secret code  to use to identify yours.)

 

What should you write about?         

The topic choice is completely your own; it need not be class/school related. 

Write about something for which you have a passion, something of importance to you, something for which you'd be interested in receiving some honest peer feedback. 

 

AT THE TOP OF YOUR PAPER, USE THIS FORMAT:

 

                                                                                                                  Your class hour/YOUR SECRET CODE

                                                                                                                  Today's date

 

 

                                                                 PR 1 "Your Original Title"

 


 

b.     CLASS-CONNECTED JOURNAL (CC)

            A "CC" is a "class-connected journal."   It is like a PR but for Wally. 

It deals with a topic that came to mind during the course of this week or the preceding week of class. It might have been inspired by something said in class discussion, something in the literature, something you wanted to bring up but didn't get the chance, etc.  Let your imagination go wild, but you must show a clear CLASS CONNECTION (CC).  Explain where you got the idea/when the idea came up if you think I might need some explanation of how the CC is class connected.

 

               

TO GET READY, JOT DOWN SOME

"CC HOT TOPIC IDEAS" BELOW FOR YOUR FIRST (AND SUBSEQUENT CC'S):

You may share these ideas with others!

1. ____________________________________________________________

2. ____________________________________________________________

3. ____________________________________________________________

4. ____________________________________________________________

5. ____________________________________________________________

 

 

3.       PEER RESPONDING:  HOW WILL I RESPOND TO SOMEONE’S PR?

 

·        If you have received someone's PR  to which you must respond tonight, respond! 

Be honest, helpful, and thorough! 

 

·        You can respond in the margins, at the end of his/her entry, on another sheet of paper, type the response, even respond in a creative manner, etc. 

 

·        HOWEVER, DO NOT REVEAL YOUR NAME or, in any way, give away who you are. 

Sign your response with your  CODE NAME.  

 

·        Try to provide at least a page of honest response (although there is really no page minimum) so that the person has a "meaty" response and one which further supports, stretches, or inspires the original writer!  DO YOUR BEST!


 

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Name________________________________Hr. ___  Date _______________

 How’s the CLT paper going?

  1. Answer the questions below to self-evaluate where you are in the process. 

 

·         Are you remembering to make print-outs/copies of your sources?                    YES     NO

 

·         Are you remembering to record pertinent info. for your works cited

page and for your parenthetical documentation?                                   YES    NO

 

·         Are you remembering to take careful notes so that your paper will

create no suspicions of plagiarism?                                                          YES    NO

 

·         Did you remember to stay away from encyclopedias and to carefully

scrutinize the use of Internet sources?                                                    YES    NO

 

 

 

 2.  Jot down any questions you have about the paper or your topic here (and

        remember to ask these questions in class ASAP):

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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 Assignment I:  Active Reading and Two Short Stories

Orwell                       Mansfield

Due date ________________

 

1.      part 4 of OJ #___  INTRO TO LITERARY THEORY.

    Here's the 4th part:  THOUGHTS ON THE ACTIVE READING CONCEPT and "Singing Lesson" and "Shooting an Elephant" and APPLICATION OF LIT THEORY TO ONE OF THESE TWO STORIES  Read the two green articles in the purple Lit. Theory packet about active reading--Moore's "How to Read" and Rosenblatt's "Life in the Margins."    One was written by Macalester professor David Chioni Moore entitled, "How to Read." This articles clarifies better for you what the phrase, "Active Reading" means.  The second article, "Life in the Margins," by Roger Rosenblatt is more of a comedic take on the concept.

In the journal, jot down what you thought of articles as well as briefly in the box in the HW packet.

 

Give your reaction to David Chioni Moore's and Roger Rosenblatt's articles here:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.     Then read the two stories.  Actively read the first one "Singing Lesson" but do not write on the actual story (we need these back).  Instead, either put a sheet of paper alongside the story to make a "margin" for comments or if you would like to print a copy of "The Singing Lesson" to do your ACTIVE READING, click here:   http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/SingLess.shtml            FYI! (especially if you've been assigned Marxism, Feminist/Gender Criticism,  New Historicism, or Psycholanalytic theory:  Here is some biographical information on Katharine Mansfield:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katherine_Mansfield  or  http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/kmansfi.htm        If you would like to print a copy of "Shooting an Elephant," click here: http://www.online-literature.com/orwell/887/   Remember to NOT actively read this story (if you can stand it!).  For some biographical information on Orwell, click here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Orwell

3.      Upon completion, give a brief response to the story as well as how it felt to "actively read" it in the box below:

 

REACTION TO "SINGING LESSON" AND ACTIVELY READING IT:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.      Now, you will read the short story "Shooting an Elephant"  (pp. 906-910) in

            your black text, LBT (Literature:  The British Tradition) or from the hand-out.. 

You may either actively read it (you have a copy of it) or simply read it without doing any recording.

            Especially consider this question:

 

Why did he or didn't he shoot the elephant?

 


 

REACTION TO "SHOOTING" AND NOT ACTIVELY READING IT:

 

 

5.      Do  WA____  Response to “Singing” and “Shooting”.

Write a one page reaction to the "Singing Lesson"  and  "Shooting an Elephant."   Make sure to include societal and personal connections.  React to characters, themes, motifs, etc.


 

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 Assignment J:  An Introduction to Literary Theory

Due date ________________

 

OJ #____ : INTRO TO LIT. THEORY

 

 This journal consists of FOUR parts over a minimum of 2 sides.

 

    Part 1:  Read the two articles which introduce literary theory:  "Defining Criticism, Theory, and Literature" by Charles E. Bressler and "The Case for Critical Theory in the Classroom" by Deborah Appleman.  In your journal, label each author clearly and discuss several points of interest from each article.

 

    Part 2:  Read the articles about your assigned literary theory. Then, in the journal (giving it your best effort), summarize/explain the literary theory.  Assume our class is your audience.

 NOTE:  Depending which article you get, this reading may be very challenging.  You will need this material for your next paper.  Plan to read your assigned articles (and reread if needed) carefully before you do the summary in your journal.

 

 CIRCLE YOUR ASSIGNED READING(S)!

 

 GROUP A  = _______________ = FORMALISM

color group

 GROUP B    = _______________ =  READER RESPONSE

color group

 GROUP C    = _______________ =  PSYCHOANALYTIC CRITICISM

color group

 GROUP D  = _______________ =  FEMINIST

color group

 GROUP E  = _______________ =  MARXIST CRITICISM

color group

 GROUP F    = _______________ =  DECONSTRUCTION

color group

 GROUP G  = _______________ =  NEW HISTORICISM

 

    Part 3:  After explaining your theory, choose ONE of the summer reading books which you think your literary theorist would be particularly interested in analyzing.  Write up an analysis/interpretation of some parts of interest in your chosen novel through the lens of your theory.  For example, what would a feminist critic think of Tale of Two Cities and why?  How would his or her feminist lens "color" what this story has to say? 

 

    Part 4:  YOU WILL DO THIS 4TH PART AFTER YOU HAVE READ SOME ARTICLES ON ACTIVE READING AND  "Shooting an Elephant" and "Singing Lesson." (See assignment I for details)!  After you have read "Shooting an Elephant" and "Singing Lesson," write up a reaction to active reading articles/theory, a reaction to the two stories, and then choose one of the two stories and analyze the story through the lens of your assigned theorist.

 (Remember!  10 pts = min. of 2 sides). 
 

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 Assignment K:  CRITIQUING FAIRY TALES/THE LIT. THEORY PAPER

Due date ________________

 

1.      Read either actively (highlighting, etc.) or passively the hand-out, "Unlearning the Myths that Bind Us:  Critiquing Fairy Tales and Films" by Linda Christensen.

 

Jot down your reaction/main points of interest, etc. below:

 

Reaction to "Unlearning the Myths"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.      Actively read the hand-out explaining our next paper, the "LITERARY THEORY PAPER."  Be ready to ask questions in class.

 

 

 

3.      If you haven’t already done so, locate a folk or fairy tale which might be used for your lit. theory paper.  You must use an actual printed copy of the tale, not just a video version of it.  We STRONGLY encourage you to look for more obscure and "original" tales than those commonly known--Disney, for example.  See Rolf or Wally for where you might look.

 

  1. WA or OJ____:  Apply Your Assigned Literary Theory to One of the 3 Summer Reading Novels (a min. of one side)

 

Think of this as a preliminary planning for an essay (never to be actually written, by the way) in which you are to analyze one of the summer reading novels through the lens of literary theorist.  What would you discuss?  Emphasize?  Be interested in?  Which characters would most interest you?  What events would you unpack?

 


 

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Assignment L:  Welcome to our Poetry Unit!  Poetic Devices & Meet Your Assigned Poem

Due date ________________

 

1.        Poetic Device Assignment (10 pts.)

The purpose of this part of tonight's assignment is to familiarize you with poetic devices, used to help enhance your understanding/interpretation of poetry and other types of literature.

 

This assignment requires that you use 2 separate sheet(s) of paper:  

                •The first sheet of paper will cover a-d below and is worth 5 points. 

                •The Works Cited page is worth 5 points.

 

 HERE’S SPECIFICALLY HOW TO DO THE POETIC DEVICE ASSIGNMENT:

 a.  You will be given some  individually assigned poetic devices  (poetry terms) as well as an  individually assigned poem.  Locate both the poem and the poetic device(s) in the class poetry packet.

 

 b.  For the poetic device(s) you have been assigned, you will need to write up at least

 two “authoritative” definitions of the device(s).

o        NOTE:  Be sure to write an abbreviated source identification beside/close to its definition so you remember which definition came from which source.         

o        •Use the pages listed  in our black LBT text  for the first definition. 

o        •For the second definition, you must consult  another source.  The source should preferably NOT be a standard dictionary (only use this if there is enough detail in the definition to make it completely clear).  Instead, I prefer you find a literary terms dictionary (much better than a standard dictionary!), a person who has a credible understanding of the term, or another textbook of poetry.

 

 c.  Be sure to include one to two examples of each term which show you understand how to apply it.   For example, after you have given the definition of the term "metaphor (a direct comparison of two unlike things not using "like" or "as")," include an example of a metaphor (The sun is a diamond.) to show that you really do understand the definitions.

 

 

 d.  On a separate sheet of paper, write out a rough draft of a Works Cited page for the sources you used to get your definition(s).  Give exactly what is necessary to cite the  bibliographic information of each source.  Your lifeline is the purple Survival Packet.  Specifically, use the yellow section for all definitions not accessed electronically.  Use the pink section for electronic sources.

Follow the directions in this packet EXACTLY!  This means order, spacing, etc.

 Remember:  This Works Cited page will be graded for the correct following of MLA format!  Do your best.  (This is a trial run for doing Work Cited pages on papers—with no major penalty.)

 


 

2.       WA_____  Analysis of your “Individually Assigned Poem”

 

My poem is ____________________________________________  poet: ______________________

                                                write the title of the poem here

NOTE:  If you were absent and did not get an assigned poem, call or e-mail the teacher.                              

1.        Read the poem silently.

2.        Read the poem aloud.

3.        Perhaps read the poem to/with someone else.

4.        Now, write the journal.  You must include discussion (of at least one side of a page) covering something on each of these SEVEN topics:

a.        Write a literal summary of the poem

b.       Describe the feelings the poem evokes

c.        Discuss themes the poem suggests

d.       Discuss connections to your own life/yourself/the lives of others

e.        Discuss connections to society

f.         Look carefully once again for the use of any  poetic devices  that make the poem "work" and, hence, enhance the understanding/appreciation of the poem as well as lead you to believe the feelings and themes you suggested in (b) and(c) above. 

 

g.       Finally, try your best to apply your assigned poetic device(s) to this poem.


 

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Assignment M:  “Musee des Beaux Arts”

Due date ________________

 

 WA_____ “Musee des Beaux Arts”   (p. 1102 in your black LBT text; there is also a copy of it for

you to mark up in your poetry packet)

 

1.      Read the poem silently.  Now look at the painting on p. 1103.

 

2.      Read "Musee" again, but this time continue to study the painting on p. 1103 as you read.

 

3.      Read the poem aloud.

 

4.      Perhaps read the poem to/with someone else.

 

5.      Now, write the journal.  You must include discussion (of at least one side of a page) covering something on each of these six topics:

a.        Write a literal summary of the poem

b.       Describe the feelings the poem evokes

c.        Discuss themes the poem suggests

d.       Discuss connections to your own life/yourself/the lives of others

e.        Discuss connections to society

f.         Look carefully for the use of any poetic devices (rhyme scheme, rhythm, allusions, similes, metaphors, personification, synecdoche, speaker's voice, tone, mood, diction, syntax, etc.) that make the poem "work" and, hence, enhance the  understanding/appreciation of the poem as well as lead you to believe the feelings and themes you suggested in (b) and (c) above.

g.       Now, try your best to apply your personally assigned poetic device(s) to this poem.


 

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 Assignment N:  THE “4-5 (depending on how many group members your group has) GROUP POEMS” ASSIGNMENT  (30 pts.)

Due date ________________

 

1.       Read all the rest of the poems  assigned to your POETRY group.  You have copies of them in your poetry packet .  Most of them are also included in our black LBT text.  You are to practice the art of "ACTIVE READING" as you read these, marking important parts, examples of poetic devices, looking for personal and societal connections, questions, ways the poems are similar and different (especially compared to the one you were personally assigned).  Which ones did you like best?   Any similar themes?  Which are like your poem?

 

RESPONSE SHEETS YOU NEED TO DO FOR EACH OF THE GROUP POEMS:

After reading all the assigned poems (those represented in your POETRY group), fill out a response sheet for each of these.  Each one of the "sheets" of "first response" is worth 5 points.  For ease in responding, you may want to copy and paste to WORD so you can type out the response sheet or even duplicate these rather than using your own notebook paper.  There are some sheets already provided for you in your poetry packet on pp. T 11- T 14.  If your teacher gives you the "okay," you may tear those out of the packet for your use.  If not, duplicate them as best as you can.

 

 NOTE:  In addition, when you are done with your response sheets, there is a debriefing sheet (which follows the template) to fill out (worth 5 points).

 

                                                                                                                                                               

Here is your template for each of your "GROUP POEMS RESPONSE SHEETS” ----------------à
 

Name___________________________ Hr.__ Due date:____________

POEM #____   Title of poem: ________________________________________________

 LBT p. ____  (or if not from LBT, attach or describe source: ______________________)

Poet: ______________________________________         

1.      After reading this poem, I immediately felt ___________________________________

                                                                              (put down an emotion (1-2 words), not a thought!)

2.      The "BIG IDEAS"/"UNIVERSAL TRUTHS" I think this poem illuminates

is/are: ______________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

Give supporting evidence and line #s:  ____________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

 

3.      I liked  /  disliked this poem because ____________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

 

4.      3 different poetic devices I noticed were (you MUST find 3—they’re there!):

device ________________________________________________ line # or line #s ____

device ________________________________________________ line # or line #s ____

device ________________________________________________ line # or line #s ____

 

5.       QUESTIONS/COMMENTS  I have about this poem: ____________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

 

 

List any poems you've read which are similar to this one in theme, style, form:

_________________________________________________________________________

 

 

(Continue this same format for all the poems--do on your own paper  or  photocopy this  or  type the rest)


 

Name___________________________________________________________  Hr. _____ Due date:___________

 

DEBRIEFING THE “5 POEMS ASSIGNMENT” (5 pts.)

When you are all done with the "5 poems assignment," fill out the following:

 

 FINAL COMMENTS ON “5 POEMS ASSIGNMENT”

 

Give feedback on:

 

·        how you thought this assignment actually went

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

·        which poems you liked the most (and would suggest perhaps I teach/read)

 

 

 

 

 

 

·        which poets you liked the most

 

 

 

 

 

 

·        which THEMES you find most recurring

 

 

 

 

 

 

·        anything else 

 


 

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 ASSIGNMENT O:  “Meditation l7”

Due date ________________

 

 WA_____  Donne’s “Meditation 17” – SIGNIFICANT QUOTES

Read John Donne's famous sermon called "Meditation l7," which is in our black LBT text pp. 366-368. 

 

Read the entire sermon first.  When you are done, do your best to identify the "BIG IDEAS" he is putting forth in this very famous sermon.  Also, think about any "UNANSWERABLE QUESTIONS" that arise in your mind as a result of reflecting on his themes.

In your WA, write down those "BIG" IDEAS" and  "UNANSWERABLE QUESTIONS."

 

Now, you are to go back and read the sermon more closely.  As you are rereading, look for quotations that you would deem "significant" in terms of emphasizing those "BIG" IDEAS" and  "UNANSWERABLE QUESTIONS."   You must locate at least 5. 

 

Write these "SIGNIFICANT QUOTATIONS" down in your WA, and after each, explain thoroughly or give rationale as to why that quotation is so significant / powerful / revealing, etc.


 

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 ASSIGNMENT P: IMAGERY & TONE in Gatsby

Due date ________________

 

In your poetry packet, there is an excerpt (page E8-9) from chapter 3 of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby.  Read the entire excerpt first.  As you read the excerpt (on pp. E8-9 in the Poetry Packet), take careful note of DIDLS!  (Diction, Imagery, Details, Language, Syntax) 

 

Now, go back with  highlighter  in hand.  Concentrate on the images Fitzgerald uses to create a picture in the reader's mind of the scene.  Look for sensory images in particular.  Highlight what you would consider the most effective images.  In the box below, jot down a few sentences describing how you see the scene "in your mind's eye."  Have you ever been at such a scene?

 

IMAGERY!  Description/commentary on the Gatsby excerpt's scene/imagery:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now, go back once again with a colored pen in hand, and concentrate on the other DIDLS--Diction, Details, Language, Syntax  Fitzgerald uses to establish his TONE--the author's attitude toward the scene (the people, the atmosphere, etc.)

 

Underline in RED the parts of the text that you feel most effectively convey TONE.  In the margins beside those lines you underline, jot down what you think those particular underlined lines indicate about Fitzgerald's attitude toward the scene. 

When you are done with this, go to pages E1, E3, E4 in the Poetry packet and look at the words to describe tone.  Look for around 5 words from these pages (or of your own choice) which best describe the TONE of this passage.  Write them down right on the Gatsby excerpt. 

OPTIONAL (for more TONE PRACTICE):  Read the Camus passage ( from The Stranger) on page E6 of the Poetry packet.  Do the same thing as you did with the Gatsby excerpt. 

NO!  WAIT!  THERE'S MORE!   Now, try Wally's TONE MULTIPLE CHOICE EXERCISE.  Click HERE to print out a copy of this exercise.  Read each passage and choose the word that best describes the tone. As you read, underline what parts of the passage made you arrive at your answer.
 

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 ASSIGNMENT Q: AP Exam Practice with Boland

Due date ________________

 

1.  Actively read Eavan Boland's "It's a Woman's World" on page 9 in your poetry packet.   After reading it at least twice, carefully read the AP test question that was used along with this poem on the 1997 AP English Literature Exam.  Try to break the question down in parts.  NOTE:  SPEND NO MORE THAN 10 MINUTES ON THIS PART!!!

 

Jot down in this box what you think this question is asking you to do:

 

 

 

 

 

Now, go back to the poem. Look specifically for evidence of  IMAGERY  and  TONE  and what lines inform the reader of Boland's complex conception of a "woman's world."

.

 NOTE  BE SURE TO CIRCLE/CITE SOME ACTUAL LINES FROM THE POEM THAT SUPPORT YOUR RESPONSE!

 

Jot down some of the powerful images in this poem and what their purpose might be in this poem.  Look especially for any repetitive imagery.

               

 

 

 

 

 

Comment here whether you think Eavan Boland's poem's tone is positive, negative, or both.

               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Describe here exactly what you think Eavan Boland's complex conception of a "woman's world" is.

 

 

 

 

 

2.  Now, you will actually write the AP Essay.  You have 30 minutes.  That’s it!  No more.  So, set a timer.

You may handwrite or type (double-space, please) it.  Remember that if you type it, you should refrain from thinking this is a finished paper.  The typing just makes it easier to get the essay down on paper. packet.  

 REMEMBER:  SPEND NO MORE THAN 30 MINUTES ON THIS!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. TIME TO DEBRIEF!

 

·        Jot down how you felt this went.

 

 

 

 

 

·        Go back and read the GRADING RUBRIC for this essay. 

 

 

·        Jot down what score you expect to get right here ______________  and now explain why.

                                                                                                  my predicted score

 

Rationale:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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 Assignment R:  Evaluation of AP Essays

Due date ________________

 

1.      Actively read the "Scoring Guide for 'It's a Woman's World.'” Your goal is to get  basic understanding of the scoring rubric an AP examiner would use to score an essay on Eavan Boland's complex conception is of a "woman's world."

 

2.      Highlight the main characteristics in the descriptive paragraph for each score--0, 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8, 9-10.  Only when you think you have a good handle on that, proceed to task #3.

 

3.      Now read the sample essays on this poem.  After you have read each essay, score it in the space on the page below the essay. 

 

After your score, write your rationale--a few comments as to why you think that essay received the score you gave it.  Do not give it a "double-score" (7-8 or 8-9) or a plus/minus (6+ or 8-).  Use whole numbers.

 

4.      Be prepared to defend your scores in class.


 

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 Assignment S:  FINAL POEM/ANALYSIS and “SHARE-A-POEM FRIDAYS”

Due date ________________

 

1.       WA_____ FINAL POEM ANALYSIS

 

1.      Actively read these four poems in your poetry packet:

a.        "The World is Too Much With Us"  by William Wordsworth

b.       "God's Grandeur" by Gerard Manley Hopkins

c.        "Any Human to Another" by Countee Cullen

d.       "The Death of a Toad"  by  Richard Wilburs.  (You will probably need a dictionary alongside you to look up words which are unfamiliar, ambiguous, or confusing in context.  Be sure to jot down those definitions in the margins of the actual copy of the poem or as footnotes.

 

2.      As you are reading, look particularly at how the poets use these elements:

                                 tone and  syntax  and  diction  and  imagery .  Remember DIDLS?

 

3.        Choose ONE of these poems upon which to write an analysis.  You must do your best at illuminating  what you think are the "BIG IDEAS" in this poem.

 

4.        Then choose  3  poetic devices to discuss.  The poetic devices which you choose SHOULD BE those you you feel actually contribute to the revelation of the "BIG IDEA(S)."  In your journal (after revealing the "BIG IDEA"), identify these 3 poetic devices, give examples, and tell how they contribute to the discovery of the meaning of the poem.

 

 NOTE  If you decide to use Wilburs' "Death of a Toad," you may instead choose to do the AP essay question listed at the top of this poem rather than what is asked for in #3 and #4 above.

 

 

2.       CLASS DEBRIEF:  HOW’S IT GOING?

Today's date: _______________________

Take a few minutes now to reflect on how the course is going for you now that we've just begun to get warmed up.

1.      What do you like most about it?

 

 

2.      What do you like least?

 

 

3.      How the "rest of your world" been impacted since starting this class?  Have you had to make huge adjustments?  Has the transition been smooth?

 

 

4.      So far, what look like the benefits of the course? 

 

 

5.      5.  As a senior in high school, what are your greatest needs right now?  Why?

 

 

6.      List any questions you have about the course thus far:


 

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 Assignment T:  Initial Reaction to Garlins

Due date ________________

 

Unlike most beginnings in this course, you will not read an Introduction to familiarize yourself with the definition of, characteristics of, and history of the garlins. I’d like to see what you uncover from the primary sources (the garlins themselves) rather than have your ideas influenced by editors’ comments, etc.

 

1.       Read the GARLINS   on the class hand-out carefully.  Study at least  5 .

 A genre is a classification of literature characterized by its form, structure, or content.   As you read the garlins, think about their genre.  Based on reading these sample garlins, be prepared in your WA to make some predictions as to the definition of a "garlin."  In other words,  what are their critical attributes?   What commonalities do they share in terms of FORM, STRUCTURE, CONTENT? 

 

How might you generalize from these prototypes?

 

2.       Do the journal WA____ “Initial Reaction to Garlins”

1.)      Write down a summary of/comments on/questions about each garlin so you can recall which one is which.  Which ones were your "favorites" and why?  Least favorites and why?

Comment a bit on each of them.  For example, what struck you?  What was each garlin about?  Was there a theme?  Did you see something significant, thought-provoking, engaging/revolting, etc.?   Which garlins do you want to be sure we discuss in class?

 

HINT:  You might want to do a quick read of all of them first.  Then, come back to some of these later after a break.  Revisit them to decide what you’d like to comment on.

 

2.)      After this, give your overall reaction to garlins in general.

 

3.)      Start a list of similar characteristics of garlins (to be added to in class tomorrow).  Think about similarities in theme, plot, structure, syntax, tone, diction, literary devices, and other patterns, etc.

 

4.)      Based on your preliminary list, write a "rough draft" of a definition of a garlin.  DO NOT LOOK UP A FORMAL DEFINITION ANYWHERE!  This is to come from your own "garlin"        study. Which of the garlins that you read would you suggest as the most representative example?

 

3.       Read through ASSIGNMENT O to prepare you  for what is coming up next.  Assignment O is a creative assignment which may be done by as many as three students together.  If you do Assignment O with other classmates, you will need to plan your time accordingly.

 

4.       Continue work on any ongoing papers.  


 

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 Assignment U:  3 Sisters

Due date ________________

 

1.       Do the journal WA____ “Similarities in Two Sisters and My Own Version Z”

 a   Look carefully at the hand-out with versions A-H of "Two Sisters." 

As you read each version, look for threads of  similarity  you see woven throughout all or most of the versions.  For the first part of this WA, write up a list of these similarities.   Note that sometimes a similarity will suddenly take on a new twist. Despite the twist, however, the similarity should still be unmistakable.  For example, the folktale, "Cinderella," may be identified in numerous cultures.  In one version, the person who helps Cinderella may be a long-lost cousin rather than a fairy godmother. 

 

 b   Now, write "Two Sisters--Version Z"--your own variation of the originals A-H.  You will be asked to "perform" your version for the class on ____________________ (performance date).

 

You may write the version with one to two other classmates who may also share in the performance. 

 

However, EACH PERSON NEEDS HIS/HER OWN COPY OF THE GARLIN!

If you like, put it to music, too!  How about memorizing it? 

 

2.      Work on ongoing papers as usual.


 

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 Assignment V:  CLOSURE TO GARLINS

Due date ________________

 

 PART 1: RESPONSE TO T. S. ELIOT QUOTE  (at least a side)

T. S.  Eliot (a modern writer of "garlins" and other notable works as well as a renowned critic)      writes this in his essay, "What is a Classic?":

"The persistence of literary creativeness in any people consists in the maintenance of an unconscious balance between tradition in the larger sense--the collective personality, so to speak, realized in the literature of the past--and the originality of the living generation."

 

Explain what you think this quote means, how it relates to our lives/society today, and finally, what it has to do with garlins. 

 

 PART 2: QUESTIONS

 NOTE  Part 2 of this WA will partially be done in-class.  You will respond to a series of questions (listed below) raised in class.  Any of the questions we do not get to in class are to be answered as best as you can on your own.

1.       Before  listening to the garlins, comment  on how you think they will sound.

 

 

2.       As you listen to the garlins  in class, comment on what crosses your mind.

 

RECORDING

YOUR COMMENTS

a)      “Barbara Allen” by Joan Baez

 

b)      "Lord Randall"--Aberdeen, Scotland

 

c)      "Lord Randall"--County Cork, Ireland

 

d)      "Lord Randall"--Leitrin, Ireland

 

e)      "Lord Randall"--Galway, Ireland

 

f)       "Lord Randall"--Glamorgan, South Wales

 

g)      "Edward"---Aberdeen, Scotland

 

h)      "Edward"---Fermanagh, Ireland

 

i)        .   "Edward" or "Son Davie"---England

 

j)        "House of the Rising Son"--Bob Dylan

 

k)     "The Three Ravens" version #1

 

"The Three Ravens" version #2

 

"The Three Ravens" version #3

 

l)        OTHERS

 

 


 

 

3.      Now that you have heard the garlins, think about the  differences in hearing  a garlin read or sung and reading them in a text.  Does something happen to the work?  How about to you as a reader/listener?  Comment on this.

 

 

 

 

 

 Complete the answers to #4 – 6 in the space BELOW at home.

 

4.      Now, go to the Norton Anthology, 6th ed. and read pp. 384-386.  Jot down any new materical that you learned about “garlins” by reading these pages.

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.      What kinds of needs do the garlins traditionally fulfill?        How are your needs at all similar to those people centuries ago to whom the garlins especially appealed? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.      What connections can you draw between those works of the past that you have read (and now               heard) and those works which you rarely, if ever, can read but, like in the days of old, must listen to--whether on tape, CD, radio, television, on stage, or in live performance? 


 

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 Assignment W:  DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT AS/MED HISTORY?

Due date ________________

 

1.      If not previously assigned, take the  pretest on AS and Medieval Times .

·        Do not consult ANY supplementary materials, historians, or World Civ. teachers to help you.  It's only a diagnostic, but try your best!  DO NOT LEAVE A SINGLE QUESTION BLANK!

 

·        If in your subsequent notetaking for this assignment (see below) you discover an answer that contradicts what you originally thought was a right answer on the pretest, you may go back to the pretest and change the answer.

 

·         NOTE:  You will get completion points for this pretest.  It will be turned in and marked for right and wrong answers.  Then, after we have completed the Chaucer unit, you will be getting it back to correct it.  At that time, the pretest will be rescored and the grade will actually count.

 

2.       NOTES and Q’s / A’s ON ANGLO-SAXON & MEDIEVAL PERIODS

 

Read carefully pp. 1-11 and 69-81 in our LBT text.  As you read,  take at least 2 sides of a page of notes on anything you think is vital to know about the Anglo-Saxon Period (449-1066) and the Medieval Period (1066-1485). 

 

 NOTE:  Take a minimum of TWO SIDES OF A PAGE of notes (5 points for two side of NOTES) but NO MORE THAN 5 SIDES OF A PAGE of notes.

 

 What to take notes on?  Focus on the "NUTS AND BOLTS"--the main characteristics and "signature events" of these times.  When deciding on what to take notes, ask this question: 

What material is really crucial to typify/characterize these periods so as  to:

a.       distinguish the two periods from each other

and

b.       distinguish each period from other historical periods?

 

3.      After taking your background notes,  highlight the most important info.  in them.  ACTIVELY READ THEM! 

 HINT!  DO NOT SKIP THIS HIGHLIGHTING STEP!

 

 

4.       WRITE 5 “Fair Game” Quiz Questions and Answers.

 

Now, on two separate sheets of paper, type (DO NOT HAND WRITE!) 5 of what you would consider "Fair Game Quiz Questions" over this material.  ("Fair Game" means that any  Adv. 12 student who put serious effort into this assignment should be able to answer your questions.             Remember, however, that the questions should be critical, not trivial, asking about the "nuts & bolts" of the

material--as defined above.)

 

·         Put your name and hour  in the upper right hand corner of both sheets.

·         Number the questions (triple space--TS--in between them).

·         On a new, separate sheet of paper write down their answers. (TS in between each answer)

 

 NOTE  DO NOT PUT THE ANSWERS ON THE BACK SIDE OF THE QUESTIONS!  USE ANOTHER SHEET!


 

USE THE FORMAT BELOW FOR YOUR QUESTIONS:

 

Sheet of paper #1

 

Sheet of paper #2:

 

                                               name & hour

FAIR GAME QUESTIONS

 

1.  Who was the most famous poet of

      the Middle Ages?             

 

2.   Will  gone sixty robdoubt second??

 

                                               name & hour

 

FAIR GAME ANSWERS

 

1.  Geoffrey Chaucer

               

 

2.  Pyt mon hon ty grailha ha.

 


 

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 ASSIGNMENT X:  THOUGHTS ON THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

Due date ________________

 

For this assignment, you will be thinking about some modern issues relating to the English language, including your earliest interactions.

 

  1. WA___:  "Thoughts on the English Language"                                     You MUST cover two areas of discussion: 

     topic 1   talk about your own learning of the English language

    Some ideas:  What do you remember of your parents' earliest English?  (If your native language is not English, you can talk about your native language here.)  What input do your parents or other adults still give you on your spoken language?  What did you realize about your own language once you started learning a second language?  Do you think there is classism in language?  Share what you like.

     

     topic 2   discuss several articles in the colored sets you were given

    Make sure you name the article before you start talking about it so I know to which article you are reacting.    First, read the the Dave Barry article.  Jot down a comment or two or some "musings" about it. Then dive into the yellow or salmon packet you were given.  "Take what you like and leave the rest!"  There is a wealth of interesting topics raised in these articles.  Jot choose as many as you want to comment on/explore connections, etc.  Be sure to LABEL THE NAME OF THE ARTICLE ABOVE YOUR RESPONSE so we know to which article you are responding!    If you need copies of the articles,

    click HERE for Dave Barry,

     

    click HERE for the YELLOW “A” ARTICLES:

    VARIOUS ARTICLES ON WORDS AND GRAMMAR and MISCELLANEOUS

     AND

    "Whose Standard?  Teaching Standard English" by Linda Christensen

     

    CLICK HERE for the IVORY “B” ARTICLES VARIOUS ARTICLES ON EBONICS and "STANDARD ENGLISH"

     AND

    "Can Lawyers Write English?" by Jerome Stern

     

      If you were absent, just choose either colored set.

     

    Here are some other interesting articles online that you might consider reading about controversial topics regarding the English language:

    http://www.pbs.org/speak/ahead/change/ruining/#

     http://www.pbs.org/speak/ahead/mediapower/vanishing/#

    http://www.pbs.org/speak/ahead/

    http://www.pbs.org/speak/words/sezwho/campustalk/

    http://www.pbs.org/speak/words/sezwho/slang/#

    http://www.pbs.org/speak/words/sezwho/buffy/

    http://www.pbs.org/speak/words/#

     

    http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20071210/013111.shtml

     

 

 

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 ASSIGNMENT Y:  BACKGROUND ON THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

Due date ________________

  1. TAKE BACKGROUND NOTES ON THE HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE!  DO NOT FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS IN THE PAPER HOMEWORK PACKET (too much work!). Take a minimum of 2 sides of a page of notes (10 HW points total) on what you think is most important and interesting concerning the background of the English Language AS FOLLOWS:  TWO SIDES MINIMUM ON THESE BLACK LBT PAGES (label these carefully in your notes): pp. 64-65; pp. 186-187; pp. 338-339; pp. 428-429; pp. 560-561; pp. 678-679; and pp. 804-805 

    and   IF ASSIGNED SPECIFICALLY, TAKE  ONE SIDE MINIMUM ON  YOUR ASSIGNED ARTICLES  (blue packets or green packets). If you need copies of the articles, click HERE for the blue ones or HERE for the green ones.  If you were absent, choose any color (blue or green).  

     What to take notes on?

    ·         on what you found personally interesting--things that make you go "hmmm..." or "aha!"

    ·         on material which is entirely new to you

    ·         on material that seems really important to understands the origins of the English language,

     

    NOTE:  Come to class tomorrow prepared to share some of what you wrote down in class in large group.  (Highlight or circle this "I'd like to share" material in your notes ahead of coming to class.)

     2.) Then, following the directions for Assignment Y #2, do 4 Etymology post-its for your 6 assigned words (choose 4 out of the six)!

    NOTE  A "GOOD" dictionary will have a section in either the front or the back of it explaining etymology.  If there isn't one at home, go to the library.

     

    EXAMPLE:  LIFE  [ME.  OE. lif, akin to ON. lif, life, G. leib, body   IE. base *leibh-,               to live, whence L. (cae)lebs, unmarried, orig., living alone (cf. CELIBATE)]

     

     EXAMPLE OF TRANSLATION OF “LIFE”   

    The word LIFE, as we use and see it today in modern English, was founded in Middle English, which was derived from the Old English word, lif, which is similar to the Old Norse word or "cognate," lif  meaning "life" and also similar to the German word, leib, meaning "body."  It is believed to have its origins in the Indo-European base, the hypothetical, leibh-, which means "to live."  The Latin word (cae)lebs, whose meaning, "unmarried," although seemingly unrelated to the meaning of the base, is shown to be directly related through the original meaning "living alone."  Finally, there is a cross-reference (in parentheses) capitals) to an English word, celibate, which derives from the Latin word caelebs

     Make sure you write each WORD in huge letters in permanent marker on the top front of the post-its and in smaller letters the etymology in pencil on the lower part of the front of each post-it!  For a list of all the assigned words (particularly needed if you were absent today--hint!  you will still need to get post-its to do this), click HERE!  Just choose any 4 words that strike your fancy.  Do ONE post-it per word.  If you don't have post-its, just use index-card sized paper!  Here's a sample of how to do the FRONT side of the post-it:  

 
 

 

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AP LIT. BEOWULF ASSIGNMENTS 2009

Seamus Heaney translation

 

So, you say you like monsters?  Get ready...                                     (rev. 2-7-09 term 3)

3.      Got Beowulf?

It’s now time to start thinking about our upcoming study of Beowulf.  You will need to purchase your own copy of the text from our school store. 

You will need this book by _______________________.

 

 

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ASSIGNMENT SH-B1-B5 "BEOWULF, DID YOU EVERKNOW THAT YOU'RE MY HERO?

Due date ________________

Click HERE if you need a copy of the entire blue BEOWULF packet.

1.      Journal Entry WA#____ “WHAT’S IN A NAME?”

 a   Read through all the articles given you on names.  CLICK HERE IF YOU NEED THE NAMES PACKET! Choose a few you feel strongly about.  Think about this concept of names.

Names were a big deal during the Anglo-Saxon times and in Beowulf.  Is this also true still in our society today?    Where did you get your name?  What weight has your name been given through-out your life?  Has your name ever brought you privilege or the cause of a negative situation?  What name would you rather have?  Do you have a nickname?  How/why did that come about?  Will you change your name after marriage?  What do you think of the increasingly popular option of a woman (man?) retaining her (his) childhood family name?  What about double or hyphenated last names?  "What's in a name, anyway?"

 

 b   Taking into consideration the ideas reflected in the paragraph above, the articles you just read on names, and your own ideas on the topic of names, write at least a one-sided page response for your WA .  Make sure you identify the name of the article you are reacting to before your actual reaction to each specific article.

 

2.      Journal Entry WA#____: “HEROES” (a two-sider = 10 pts.)

You will use a packet of articles (as well as one article about a female "hero" and a male "hero") as a basis for this  HEROES JOURNAL ENTRY .   CLICK HERE IF YOU NEED THE HEROES PACKET! Furthermore, one of the most popular topics regarding Beowulf is  the concept of "heroism" and whether Beowulf, the character, measures up to the Anglo-Saxon definition, a modern definition, and, ultimately, your personal definition.  This packet of articles helps tremendously in reviewing the concepts out there in our world today regarding a "MODERN HERO."  So, again, read the articles carefully. 

 For this minimum of two-sided journal entry, comment on several of the following:

a.     the article entitled "Learning the Power and the Point of Communication" on the reverse side of the salmon cover sheet

b.     the article in the packet by Paul Levy entitled "What Makes a Hero?"

c.     the article in the packet from Psychology Today entitled "How to Be Great!" 

d.     at least ONE other article from this packet (or another cool article you find on your own about a "hero"--be sure to attach a copy of this article to your journal)

e.     two articles included in this packet about two individual heroes (a male  and  a female) 

 

Taking these articles into consideration and your own ideas about what a hero is, address all or any of the following:  Talk about your own as well as what you think our society's perceptions of a hero are.  In addition, reflect on what you think the early English people thought of when defining a hero.  Think about who your heroes were  (and why) as you were growing up and how those people might have faded from your memory.  What heroes do you have now (or would like to have)?  What heroes would you wish for your children to have?  What heroes do you think they will have (regardless of your input)?

 

 NOTE  You might even take Professor Chiodo's suggestion (as mentioned in Dale Dauten's article on the reverse side) and turn what you have written into a letter to actually send to your personal "hero" (or someone you admire most if the word "hero" sounds too weird/powerful/trendy.) 

What better gift to give that special person during your senior year?????? 

Click HERE if you need a copy of the entire blue BEOWULF packet.

Ap Lit.  BEOWULF ASSIGNMENTS 2010

 

Beowulf  PART 1 (pp. 3-89)  ASSIGNMENT

Do journal WA____ Beowulf  PART 1  (minimum of 2 sides)

 

  1. BACKGROUND NOTES on the Anglo-Saxon Heroic Ideal from blue pages in Beowulf Packet “The Middle Ages” (Norton Anthology)  (1/2 page minimum)

 

  1. BATTLE CHART—list the key elements of each battle.  Look specifically for comparisons and contrasts between the battles once the second battle takes place.  Some say the battles mirror the three stages of life—adolescence, middle age, and old age.  Try to look for elements of each battle which relate to the stages of life.  Also, look for elements which characterize Beowulf’s personality as well as Anglo-Saxon values.

Beowulf vs. Grendel

Beowulf vs. Mom

Beowulf vs. Dragon

 

1.  no weapons

 

2.

 

etc.

 

 

1.

 

2.

 

etc.

 

 

1.

 

2.

 

etc.

 

 

NOTE: BACK SIDE OF THE PAPER!

 

Beowulf part 1: Quotes 1 – 19 and LAYS

 

SIGNIFICANT QUOTE:  Look over quotes 1-19 (or find your own quotes from part one), and choose the ONE quote that you think is MOST significant for part one.

 

Write the quotation in its entirety on your journal entry (along with its page number) and underneath it, comment on  each of the following:

a.        the quote's context

b.        its possible meaning and relevance to part 1

c.        possible larger meaning for us today or you personally

 

SIGNIFICANT LAY:  Choose one of these three lays:

"The Lay of Breca" pp.  35-39

"The Lay of Siegmund and Hermod" pp.  59-61

"The Lay of Finnsburg"  pp. 71-81

 

For the lay you choose, discuss the significance of  the lay to Beowulf (the character) or any of the other characters AND/OR to the plot or themes you are seeing surface  in the story.  Why was the lay included?  How necessary is it? 

 

 

 

Beowulf  PART 2 (pp. 89-149)  ASSIGNMENT

Do journal WA____ Beowulf  PART 2  (minimum of 2 sides)

 

A. GARDNER’S GRENDEL

1.  Actively read the excerpt from John Gardner's Grendel carefully.  You might want to read the 5 questions in the lower right hand corner first so that you can key into some of the main points early.

 

2.  Write a minimum of a half page reaction to this work.  Did you like it?  Was it as good, worse, better than Beowulf?  What parts confused or delighted or repulsed or intrigued you?

Share what you'd like.  You may write down some questions you have about the work itself, too.

 Now, continue in your journal with  answering the 5 questions  listed in the corner of your copy Gardner's Grendel.  Number each question and either rewrite it or include the question in the frame of your answer.

 

3.         Read the article attached to Gardner’s Grendel  about the controversy of this short novel.  It is called "Grappling with Grendel or What We Did When the Censors Came" by Kenneth L. Zeeman who teaches English at Viewmont High School in Bountiful, Utah.    Write down a brief response to this article.

 

 

B.  Now read part 2 of Beowulf (pp. 89-149).  After reading, complete the second column of the BATTLE CHART

Beowulf vs. Grendel

Beowulf vs. Mom

Beowulf vs. Dragon

 

1.  no weapons

 

 

1. etc.

 

 

1. etc.

 

 

C. Beowulf part 2: Quotes 20-29 and LAYS

 

SIGNIFICANT QUOTE:

 

Look over quotes 20-29 (or find your own quotes from part 2), and choose the ONE quote that you think is MOST significant for part 2.

 

Write the quotation in its entirety on your journal entry (along with its page number) and underneath it, comment on  each of the following:

a.        the quote's context

b.        its possible meaning and relevance to part 2

c.        possible larger meaning for us today or you personally

 

SIGNIFICANT LAY:

 "The Lay of Higd and Thryth"  pp. 131-135

                        Discuss the significance of this lay to Beowulf (the character) or any of the other characters AND/OR to the plot or themes you are seeing surface  in the story.  Why was the lay included?  How necessary is it? 

 

 

Beowulf  PART 3 (pp. 149-213)  ASSIGNMENT

Do journal WA____ Beowulf  PART 3  (minimum of 2 sides)

 

A.  Now read part three of Beowulf (pp.149-213). 

After reading, consider the following question: “TO BE MOVED OR NOT—by Beowulf?”

 

J. R. R. Tolkien, known to most of you as the author of that fantastical trilogy, The Lord of the Rings, was by training an academician--in fact, a medieval scholar.  In his now famous 1936 essay, "Beowulf:  The Monsters and the Critics," Tolkien writes:

 

It [Beowulf] is an heroic-elegiac poem; and in a sense all of its first 3136 lines are a prelude to a dirge [. . . ] one of the most moving ever written.

 

Write about this quote in your entry.  What do you imagine he meant by such a statement?  You might begin by considering what it makes it a "heroic" poem.

 

What does it show us of the "heroic ideal"?  And what is elegiac about it?  (Be sure to look up “elegiac” and “elegy.”) The phrase "heroic-elegiac" is paradoxical, no?  And there's the idea of a dirge.  (Be sure to look up “dirge.”) How so?

 

Finally, where are you on the moving part?  Think about what constitutes "moving" to you.  To others?

 

Tolkien actually calls it--yes, the same Beowulf we read--"most moving ever written."  What do you think?  Was Beowulf moving to you?  What would most people find it moving?  Why or why not?

 

B. COMLETE THE 3rd COLUMN OF THE BATTLE CHART 

 

Beowulf vs. Grendel

Beowulf vs. Mom

Beowulf vs. Dragon

1.  no weapons

1. etc.

1. etc.

 

C. Beowulf part 3: Quotes 30-51 and LAY

 

SIGNIFICANT QUOTE:  Look over quotes 30-51 (or find your own quotes from part 3), and choose the ONE quote that you think is MOST significant for part 3.

 

Write the quotation in its entirety on your journal entry (along with its page number) and underneath it, comment on  each of the following:

a.        the quote's context

b.        its possible meaning and relevance to part 3

c.        possible larger meaning for us today or you personally

 

SIGNIFICANT LAY: Before writing up the significance of the lay, review the lays in part 3: 

"The Lay of the Last Survivor"  p. 151-155

"The Lay of Heardred"  pp. 161-163

"The Lay of the Three Brothers:  Herbald, Hathcyn, Higlac," pp.  163-169

"The Messenger Lay of Ongentho"   pp. 197-203

Now focus on the most important lay of all: "The Lay of the Last Survivor"  pp. 151-155

                        Discuss the significance of this lay to Beowulf (the character) or any of the other characters AND/OR to the plot or themes you are seeing surface  in the story.  Why was the lay included?  How necessary is it?

 
 

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 ASSIGNMENT SH-B6:  GEARING UP FOR THE GRAND BEOWULF FINALE

Due date ________________

 

Choose ONE of the following choices of journal entries.

           

 

 Choice 1: Journal Entry WA#___ “SOME POETRY CONNECTIONS TO BEOWULF”.

 

1.          Read these poems which can be connected to Beowulf:  Shelley's "Ozymandias" (on p. 638 in our black LBT text), Gray's "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard" (on p. 531--intro; 532-536--poem in our black LBT text), and Wilbur's "Beowulf" (if your teacher gives you a copy of this last one).

 

2.          Now respond to the ideas in TWO of these three poems and how each connects to Beowulf and/or Beowulf.

 

 

 

 Choice 2: Journal Entry WA#___ TOLKIEN ASKS “TO BE MOVED OR NOT?”

 

J. R. R. Tolkien, known to most of you as the author of that fantastical trilogy, The Lord of the Rings, was by training an academician--in fact, a medieval scholar.  In his now famous 1936 essay, "Beowulf:  The Monsters and the Critics," Tolkien writes:

 

It [Beowulf] is an heroic-elegiac poem; and in a sense all of its first 3136 lines are a prelude to a dirge [. . . ] one of the most moving ever written.

 

Write about this quote in your entry.  What do you imagine he meant by such a statement?  You might begin by considering what it makes it a "heroic" poem.

 

What does it show us of the "heroic ideal"?  And what is elegiac about it?  The phrase "heroic-elegiac" is paradoxical, no?  And there's the idea of a dirge.  How so?

 

Finally, where are you on the moving part?  Think about what constitutes "moving" to you.  To others?

 

Tolkien actually calls it--yes, the same Beowulf we read--"most moving ever written."  What do you think?  Was Beowulf moving to you?  What would most people find it moving?  Why or why not?


 

Choice 3:  Journal Entry WA#______  Respond to Ideas Included in “Helpful Hints” Packet  

 

Go back to the hand-out you were given as we began our story of Beowulf.  The hand-out was entitled "Helpful Hints to Unpack Beowulf."  Read through the page of ideas/topics and respond to as many as you wish.  Just be sure to fill an entire page with your ideas.

 

 Choice 4:  Journal Entry WA#______  Create The Game of Beowulf     

                               

Knowing what you know of popular board games  and  the story of Beowulf, create a board game that would re-enact the story's events, characters, and themes.  Actually create the rules, board, playing pieces, etc.

YOU MAY COLLABORATE AND PRODUCE THIS GAME WITH ONE OTHER STUDENT IN OUR CLASS IF YOU LIKE.


 

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 ASSIGNMENT SH-B7:  LATE NIGHT THOUGHTS

Due date ________________

 

1.        Re-read your WA____ "Lay of the Last Survivor."  At the end of what you wrote in class, comment (in about a paragraph) on the experience of the activity.

 

2.         Journal Entry WA#____ “LATE NIGHT THOUGHTS”

Read the article, "Late Night Thoughts," and respond to it in at least a page.  If  you could write the author a letter or ask him any questions, what would they be?

Click HERE if you need a copy of the entire blue BEOWULF packet where you can find this essay.

 

*********************************************************************

 
 

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 ASSIGNMENT G1: WELCOME TO GREEN LAND  --SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT

Due date ________________

 

1.         Read the front page of the Sir Gawain packet.  For a copy of the Gawain packet, click HERE.

 

2.         Read the Introduction to Gawain -- see the white pages in the Gawain Packet right before the text of the poem

                            (These are from pp. 231-233 in the Norton Anthology, 5th ed. or pp. 200-202 in the Norton Anthology, 6th ed.)  For a copy of the Gawain packet, click HERE.

 

3.         Read parts 1 and 2 (from pp. 202-225 in the Norton Anthology, 6th ed.).    BIG HINT!  You may want to read the poem aloud!  For a copy of the Gawain packet, click HERE.

 

 

4.          Do WA____  Some Preliminary Thoughts on Gawain parts 1 – 2

 

A.      After you have read the text,  think about these ideas :

a.        the significance/associations of the color green

b.       why Gawain was chosen for this "quest"

c.        how the "imperfect human is really the perfect human"

d.       comparisons and contrast between these three characters: Arthur, Sir Gawain, the Green Knight

e.        the symbolic significance/associations that are conjured up in your mind with the following animals:  a deer, a boar, a fox.  You may have been given a chart in which to write down these animal associations.  Jot down your ideas in the first column the chart

f.         how does Gawain qualify as a representative "medieval romance"

g.       what similarities and differences do you see between Beowulf and Gawain and the Green Knight.

 

B.       For the journal,  jot down your ideas on these:  

o        •reading the introduction,

o        •what happens in parts 1 and 2,

o        •at least three of the ideas listed above (a-g)

 

5.           Be prepared for a quiz  on the Intro., the information in the hand-out, & Gawain parts 1 and 2.


 

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 ASSIGNMENT G2: GAWAIN HITS THE ROAD and “WHY GREEN?”

Due date ________________

           

1.          Read parts 3 and 4. (pp. 258-288 in the Norton Anthology, 5th ed. Or pp. 225-254 in the Norton Anthology, 6th ed.).   For a copy of the Gawain packet, click HERE.

 BIG HINT!  You may want to read the poem aloud!

 

2.           Fill out the Comparison / Contrast Chart  of the 3 Animals/Hunts/Temptations/Blows. Click HERE for a copy of the chart. For a copy of the Gawain packet, click HERE.

 

After all the boxes are filled, look for ways the columns associate with each other.

a.        In the first column in the boxes under the word "Animals," jot down what symbolic significances/associations are conjured up in your mind with these animals:  a deer, a boar, a fox.

b.       In the second column in the boxes under the word "Bercilak's hunt," jot down what characterizes each hunt (how it is gone about, what methods are used, the results, etc.).

c.        In the third column in the boxes under the word "temptations," jot down what characterizes each of the three temptation experiences.  Look at both the strategies/reactions/results in terms of Sir Gawain and the Lady.

d.       In the fourth column in the boxes under the word "blows," jot down what characterizes each confrontation between Gawain and the Green Knight.

 

3.         Do WA ________ “Gawain Closure Topics”  (a minimum of one side – 5 pts.)

 

 Analytic Journal Entry on Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

 

Your group will be assigned a different set of two topics.  Each group member will choose ONE of the topics.   Devote at least a page to your topic or whatever it takes to fully explore the topic. 

___________________________________________________________________________________

 GROUP A CHOICES

 

 A1          Would Sir Gawain be considered a hero, even after his “mistake”?

 

  A2         Either agree or disagree.  Gawain came through the challenge successfully.  Give support.

___________________________________________________________________________________

 GROUP B CHOICES

 

 B1          If Gawain was reincarnated, what would we think of today’s society or today’s society think of him?  Is he admirable?

 

B2           Discuss why Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is considered by many to epitomize the medieval romance.

___________________________________________________________________________________

 GROUP C CHOICES

 

C1           How does Gawain’s fate and success/lack of success reflect on the Knights of the Round Table?

 

C2           How does Sir Gawain and the Green Knight reflect Christian values?

___________________________________________________________________________________


 

GROUP D CHOICES

 

D1           Is dishonor worse than death in medieval society?  Is this still reflected in society today?

 

D2           Why do you think women are considered to be the “root of all evil” in Sir Gawain?  How does this relate to courtly love and its rules?

___________________________________________________________________________________

 GROUP E CHOICES

 

E1            What is so important about the sash?  Why does Gawain wear it forever?  What does this symbolize?  How does it differ from the nick on the neck?

 

E2            Is this a happy or unhappy ending?  Justify your answer.

___________________________________________________________________________________


*************************************************************************************

 

 ASSIGNMENT G3: THE GREEN LETTERS

Due date ________________

 

For this journal, you are to write a letter based on SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT.

 

 This is  WA# _________: ____________________Letter

name of character writing the letter

 

Choose one of the four scenarios below upon which to base a letter you will write.  Make sure you defend your viewpoint using examples (quotations are also welcome!) from the text.  Please keep plot summary to a minimum.  As always, your entry (the letter) must be a minimum of one page.  Circle the letter you choose, and write its title (“Arthur’s Letter,” for example) at the top of your page.

 

For Arthur's and Gawain's letters, base your viewpoint on this quote:

 

"Gawain is the ideal man because he demonstrates that he  cannot be the ideal--he's a man."        

 

1.         Arthur’s letter

Sir Cameron is a young knight currently studying in France.  He is one of Arthur's favorites and most promising knights.  Arthur knows that word has reached him about Sir Gawain's adventure with the Green Knight, and he also knows that Sir Cameron is very eager to learn to live his life according to the code of chivalry.  Arthur thinks he can learn a valuable lesson from Gawain's adventure and perhaps see Gawain as somewhat of a model.  Using the philosophy in the quote, write the letter Arthur might send to Sir Cameron to convince him of Gawain's success.  Start out your letter, “Dear Sir Cameron.”

 

2.         Gawain’s letter

Gawain has been home a few months now and has had time to reflect on his adventure with the Green Knight.  He still feels he has failed both himself and Arthur's court.  He knows of Arthur's young and promising favorite, Sir Cameron. He genuinely likes Sir Cameron and feels he may be the key to the future of Camelot and the perpetuation of the code of chivalry.  He decides to write a letter to his young friend hoping to convince him not to make the same mistakes he made and to not view his life as ideal.  Refuting the philosophy of the quote, write the letter Gawain might send to Sir Cameron to convince him that he would be wrong in seeing the adventure of the Green Knight as successful.  Start out your letter, “Dear Sir Cameron.”

 

For Morgan's and Felicia's letters, base your viewpoint on this quote:

 

"Gawain ...starts out as the perfect knight and moves downward ending as an imperfect ‘fol chevalier’ (chivalric fool or foolish gentleman) who is the object of laughter rather than admiration.”  


 

3.         Morgan’s letter

Morgan LeFay is convinced that her scheme was successful in showing the weakness and failure of Gawain and Arthur’s court.  She decides to write a letter to her cousin Felicia convincing her that she has triumphed and Gawain has ultimately fallen.  Using the philosophy of the quotation, write the letter from Morgan to Felicia.  Start out your letter, “Dear Felicia.”

 

4.         Felicia’s letter

Felicia has received the letter Morgan has written to her as described in question 3.  However, she believes Morgan is wrong and that her conclusion about Gawain ending up a fool and an object of ridicule rather than admiration is ludicrous.  She knows the story well and decides to write a letter back to Morgan convincing her that Gawain did not start out perfectly or move downward to end up the way the quote described.  Refuting the philosophy of the quote, write the return letter from Felicia to Morgan.  Start out your letter, “Dear Morgan.”


************************************************

revised May 23, 2008

ON TO CHAUCER!

 ASSIGNMENT C1: GETTING CHUMMY WITH CHAUCER’S CHARACTERS

Due date ________________

 

 Write your assigned character here: ___________________ p._____

 

1.         Jot down NOTES and ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS on Background Material  on Chaucer and Canterbury Tales.  The total of these NOTES AND ANSWERS WILL BE A MINUMUM OF 2 SIDES (10 points)

 

a.        Take at least one side of a page of  NOTES (5 points)  on the following material:

•Anything new to you (for example, info. you have never run across in other classes.)

Focus on the main events of Chaucer's life and whatever else strikes you. 

 

 Here are the readings

• Read pp. 112-114 in your LBT textbook.

• Read Lumianky's "Some Introductory Observations for the Modern Reader of The Canterbury Tales" in  Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, pp. xii-xxix.

 

b.        At the top of the back side of your  NOTES ,  you will answer a series of questions (5 points).

First, copy and answer the following question:

"Based on reading this material, what type of person do you envision Geoffrey Chaucer to be?"

 

2.        Read p. 343 – top of p. 348  (just before the monk is introduced) -- the"General Prologue" in the back of the Lumiansky translation, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

3.        Copy and answer this question in your  NOTES :

"How do you think you did in understanding what you just read-- the Middle English? "

 

4.         Turn to our black LBT text.  Read pp. 115 to 119 (stop at line 167).   

Now, reflect on how much you really understood of the Middle English version in the Lumiansky.  Copy and answer this question in your  NOTES:  

o        "How did you really do in understanding Chaucer? "

 

5.         Turn back to the Lumiansky PROSE translation (the small book).

Read the entire "General Prologue" (pp. 1-17) in modern English prose (yeah!).

As you read, jot down a list of the characters, jotting down some characteristics of each. 

Do this also in your  NOTES.  This is to help you keep the characters straight!

Slow down when you get to the "ASSIGNED CHARACTER" on whom you are to become "an   expert."  Pay careful attention when you reach your character's section in the "General Prologue."  (You will not need to read that character's actual tale at this point.)

 

 Being an “expert” means:  you are in charge of knowing what that character looks like, his/her personality, characteristics, what Chaucer seems to think of the character, and any other important aspects that come to mind.

 NOTE:   BE PREPARED TO READ THE SECTION ABOUT YOUR CHARACTER ALOUD AND/OR TO "REPORT" ON THAT CHARACTER TO THE CLASS TOMORROW. 

 

6.        Read Chaucer’s “Epilogue” or “Retraction” (pp. 341-342).

Answer this final question in your  NOTES :

o        "What's Chaucer's point in writing this "Epilogue/Retraction"?

 

7.   After all the note taking, do journal entry

                     WA ______ “GETTING TO KNOW YOU…”

Write about the following two topics in this journal (approx. 1/2 page each).

 

a.        First, introduce your assigned pilgrim in your own words.

Start with these words: "Let me introduce _____________."  

                                                                                                                  your pilgrim

 

b.        Next, imagine that you are a pilgrim on this pilgrimage. 

Write your own introduction (the way you think Chaucer would have done it).  Be sure to mention which pilgrims (either in the actual Canterbury Tales or others you'd be sure to have join you) you'd see yourself spending time with or ignoring.

 

Start with these words: "There was also a _____________________[devoted student? track star? loyal daughter? burnt-out senior? aspiring actor? Quiz Bowl whiz?] by the name of __________"

your name

 

8.         CULTURAL LITERARY TIDBIT – this is an optional task!

Before our next class, look up/review (or review if you had Psychology class) the definition and explanation of PHYSIOGNOMY  and the meaning of the  HUMORS  (body fluids – black bile, yellow bile, phlegm, blood – which supposedly determined your temperament.

 

Jot down what you found in your  NOTES  (the ones on Chaucer mentioned above).  Be prepared to share this information with the class.
 

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 ASSIGNMENT C2:  YOU SAY YOU CAN’T JUDGE A BOOK BY ITS COVER?

Due date ________________

 

If you have not completed the CHAUCERIAN SHADOWING EXPERIENCE, do so first. 

You are to observe stranger for 5-10 minutes.  Jot down everything you can possibly think of that gives clues as to what

the stranger's personality (or temperament or "humor") is like.  Look at the list of questions on the blue hand-out explaining

journal or on the front of the yellow CHAUCER packet.  After you have completed your observations, do what it says

regarding the FRONT side of the journal.

 

Now that that is complete, do the back of  OJ_____  "Chaucerian Shadowing/What's My Physiognomy?"

 

•DO NOT DO THIS ENTRY UNLESS TOLD TO DO SO BECAUSE THIS ENTRY MIGHT BE DONE DURING CLASS. 

 

•It goes on the back side of journal entry WA_____ Chaucerian Shadowing, the one  we did in class where you left the room to go "shadow" a stranger. 

 

•FYI:  When you are done with this side, your OJ____ will be 2-sider (10 pts.).

 

•Title this second side OJ____ "Additional Thoughts on Physiognomy"

 

HERE'S THE ENTRY:

 

FIRST, reflect on what you learned through doing the Chaucerian Shadowing Activity and what you think about the ideas of physiognomy and/or the humors (sanguine, melancholy, phlegmatic, and choleric).

 

How does any of this fit for you?

 

NOW, CHOOSE ONE OR TWO OF THE THREE TOPICS BELOW.

 

If you choose to write about 2 of the topics below, devote a minimum of 1/2 page (more is welcome) to each of the two topics.

 

CHOICE ONE

Describe how you think someone else would do the Chaucerian Shadowing activity for you.  (You are the person someone else is describing/analyzing by your physiognomy.)

 

 

CHOICE TWO

Discuss how you have personally been affected by the concept of physiognomy.  Have you ever been judged by what you looked like? Did your size, hair style, voice, mannerisms, make-up, clothing, or anything external about you bring unnecessary grief or uncalled-for advantage?  Write about how "judging people's books based on their covers" has affected you (or people you know) in your life.

 

CHOICE THREE

If you would rather write about the humors, talk about which of these seem to apply to you personally (or to people you know).  What humor or combinations of humors are most like you?  Do different humors seem to depict you in only certain situations?  Are you more sanguine at school but melancholic at home? Moreover, what do you think people would predict your humor to be?  Why?  What about people you are close to?  Do your two combinations of humors bring strain to the relationship?  What about your parents' humors?


 

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 ASSIGNMENT C3: THERE ONCE WAS A GENTLE KNIGHT  

Due date ________________

 

1.          Re-read the section in the prologue which introduces the knight (pp. 1-2).

2.          Now read "The Knight's Tale" in the Lumiansky pp. 18-58.

As you read, keep track of the characters and their relationships/connections to the gods.  If you haven't studied much mythology, I suggest you consult an encyclopedia or mythology book to look up these gods:  Zeus, Mars, Venus, Diana, Pluto, Saturn.  (Some have Greek names as well as Roman names.)

 

3.         Do journal entry  OJ____ “About ‘The Knight’s Tale’”

Now reflect on this tale.  Think about your first impressions or reactions or things that make you say "hmmm" or "aha."

 

In your minimum of one side of a page journal entry, respond to the following:

 

 1. TOPIC ONE

 

FIRST, CHOOSE ONE OF THESE 6 TOPICS TO RESPOND TO.  You must write at least 1/2 a page on your topic of choice!

 

a.        Your own observations...

What struck you as you read the tale?  What bothered you? Which characters seem most important?  With which characters did you identify?  What did you like or dislike about the tale?

 

b.        Relationship of the teller to the tale.

Look back tat the description of the teller in the prologue.  In what ways does this tale “suit the teller”?  In what ways might the teller of the tale connect with the tale’s message or plot?

 

c.        Characters

Who are the major characters in the tale?  Who is the protagonist? Who are possible antagonists?  What is the central conflict?  How is it resolved?  What does anyone learn throughout or by the end of the tale?

 

d.        The tale as a reflection of the Medieval Period

What do we learn about the Medieval Period through the reading of this tale:  What does the tale seem to tell us about what Medieval people were like, what they held as important, how they interacted, what they did with their time?

 

e.        Motifs (recurring situations, plot elements, character types, etc.  An example would be the "lovers' triangle.")

What plot elements do you recognize from other works of literature?  What things are repeated within the story itself?  Are there any stereotypes?

 

f.         Literary Theory

Which literary theorist(s) (formalist, psychoanalytic, reader response theorist, feminist, Marxist, deconstructor, or New Historicist) would be most interested in this tale?  Why?  About what aspects would the theorist have an interest in?  Now, choose a theory and discuss how that theorist might interpret at least one part of the story or the story as a whole?  your above WA___.

 


 

2. TOPIC TWO

 

NOW, CHOOSE ONE OF THESE 5 TOPICS TO RESPOND TO.  You must write at least 1/2 a page on this second topic of choice!

 

a.        MEDIEVAL ROMANCE

This story is an example of the most popular literary genre in the Middle Ages called "medieval romance."  Without looking up the definition of "medieval romance," give a thoughtful guess of the definition and characteristics you think a medieval romance has.  What elements in this story are examples of this definition?

 

b.        GODS

Discuss the importance/significance of the gods in this story.  What does their intervention suggest about theme?

 

c.        GENDER ROLES

Discuss the gender roles in the story.  What do the ways that men and women conduct themselves suggest about the way people of the middle ages viewed men?  women?

 

d.        STORY OF THESEUS?

The story was originally 5 times as long as Chaucer's version.  It was written by an Italian poet named Baccaccio.  Chaucer liked it and decided to trim it down and "improve" upon it.  Baccaccio originally titled the story "The Story of Theseus."  Why might that have been a better title in terms of theme?  What is Theseus' role in this story?

 

e.        THEME

Choose ONE of the following popular medieval (and universally age-old) themes.  Discuss what is said about ONE of these in "The Knight's Tale."

 

•the conflict of free will vs. destiny (fate or fortune)

 

•the restoration of order

 

•adherence to a chivalric code or a code of honor

 

•the tension between head and heart

 

What universal truths emerge from the tale?  These could relate as much to our lives today as they did to the people of the Medieval Period.  Does Chaucer seem to advocate/promote a certain way of life or viewpoint towards something in the tale?  What's in it for ALL of us?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 ASSIGNMENT C4: WELCOME TO CHAUCER – GROUP PROJECT

Due date ________________

 

1.        You will be assigned a special tale from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

Several other students will read the same tale.  After you have read this tale individually, you will come together as a group to debrief and plan a  lesson/discussion about this tale. 

Here's the project description:

The goal of this project is for your group to lead a productive class discussion which will enhance the understanding of the significance and meaning of your group's tale.

Each group will have two meetings to discuss, analyze, and plan a group discussion on its assigned tale.  Your group will be in charge of class discussion for about 30 minutes.

The grade on this presentation/discussion will be the equivalent of one paper = 50 points.

Everyone in your group will receive the same grade.

Your group must also create a journal entry which will be assigned to the entire class after all the group tales have been discussed.

 

Each group will read a different tale (and its prologue) assigned from these choices:

 

Circle your tale below:

GROUP

PROLOGUE & TALE

GENRE

DATE

GROUP A

Wife of Bath's Prologue & Tale
(pp. 153 – 176)

prologue = confession

tale = exemplum

 

GROUP B

Nun's Priest's Prologue and Tale
(pp. 139 – 152)

tale = a beast fable

 

GROUP C

Pardoner's  Prologue and Tale
(pp. 286 – 299)

prologue = confession

tale = exemplum

 

GROUP D

Physician's Tale
(pp 280 – 285)

a legend

 

GROUP E

The Cleric’s Tale

(pp. 199-223)

 

a folk tale or a type of ode

 

GROUP F

The Merchant’s Tale

(pp. 224-247)

an allegory

 

GROUP G

The Franklin’s Tale

(pp. 262-279)

a Breton lay (a lay from Brittany)

 

GROUP H

The Manciple’s Tale

(pp. 331-338)

a legend or a fable

 

 

 

2.       WA_____ INITIAL REACTION TO MY GROUP TALE:________________

name of tale

Read the tale you have been assigned.  Think about your first impressions/reactions/things that make you say "hmmm" or "aha."

 

In your minimum of a one page journal entry, choose 5 of the following 7 topics to which you must respond.

 

 NOTE  YOU WILL ONLY GET FULL CREDIT IF YOUR ENTRY DOES TAKE UP 5 DIFFERENT TOPICS.  LABEL THEM CLEARLY!  -1 for each topic short of 5!


 

 GROUP TALE JOURNAL TOPICS (choose 5):

 

1.       Your own observations...

What struck you as you read the tale?  What bothered you?  Which characters seem most important?  With which characters did you identify?  What did you like or dislike about the tale?

 

2.       Relationship of the teller to the tale

Look back at the description of the teller in the prologue.  In what ways does this tale "suit the teller"?  In what ways might the teller of the tale connect with the tale's message or plot?

 

3.       Characters

Who are the major characters in the tale?  Who is the protagonist?  Who are possible antagonists?  What is the central conflict?  How is it resolved?  What does anyone learn throughout or by the end of the tale?

 

4.       The tale as a reflection of the Medieval Period

What do we learn about the Medieval Period through the reading of this tale?  What does the tale seem to tell us about what Medieval people were like, what they held as important, how they interacted, what they did with their time...?

 

5.       Motifs (recurring situations, plot elements, character types, etc.  An example would be the "lovers' triangle.")

What plot elements do you recognize from other works of literature?  What things are repeated within the story itself?  Are there any stereotypes? 

 

6.       Themes (these are major ideas about life considered in the tale)

What universal truths emerge from the tale?  These could relate as much to our lives today as they did to the people of the Medieval Period.  Does Chaucer seem to advocate/promote a certain way of life or viewpoint towards something in the tale?  What's in it for ALL of us?

 

7.       Literary Theory

Which literary theorist(s) (formalist, psychoanalytic, reader response theorist, feminist, Marxist, deconstructor, or New Historicist) would be most interested in this tale?  Why?  About what aspects would the theorist have an interest in?  

 

Now, choose a theory and discuss how that theorist might interpret at least one part of the story or the story as a whole?  your above WA___.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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 ASSIGNMENT C5:  GETTING TO KNOW YOUR GROUP TALE BETTER

Due date ________________

 

 WA_______ GETTING TO KNOW MY GROUP TALE BETTER

 

Circle your tale below:

GROUP

PROLOGUE & TALE

GENRE

DATE

GROUP A

Wife of Bath's Prologue & Tale
(pp. 153 – 176)

prologue = confession

tale = exemplum

 

GROUP B

Nun's Priest's Prologue and Tale
(pp. 139 – 152)

tale = a beast fable

 

GROUP C

Pardoner's  Prologue and Tale
(pp. 286 – 299)

prologue = confession

tale = exemplum

 

GROUP D

Physician's Tale
(pp 280 – 285)

a legend

 

GROUP E

The Cleric’s Tale

(pp. 199-223)

 

a folk tale or a type of ode

 

GROUP F

The Merchant’s Tale

(pp. 224-247)

an allegory

 

GROUP G

The Franklin’s Tale

(pp. 262-279)

a Breton lay (a lay from Brittany)

 

GROUP H

The Manciple’s Tale

(pp. 331-338)

a legend or a fable

 

 

 

 

 CHAUCER GROUP TALE INDIVIDUAL WORK

 

Each group member will be assigned a different task for your second group meeting.  Read your task carefully!  Make sure you understand your individual task thoroughly before leaving class today.)

 

NOTE:  Everyone is expected to come to class tomorrow with this work completed.

If yours is missing, your group will be at a disadvantage! 

 


 

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 ASSIGNMENT C6:  "CLASSIC" CHAUCER?  OR  "ARE YOU KIDDING? 

HOW CAN THIS BE CONSIDERED A CLASSIC?"

Due date ________________

 

·         Read the next paragraph carefully.  See me/contact me if you have questions.

Many anthologies which include Chaucer choose not to offer "The Miller's Tale" & "The Reeve's Tale."  These tales are told by very un-Knight-like people who enjoy a bawdy tale--especially if it can be used to humiliate an enemy.  These tales do include humor that may bother some with innuendo as well as blatant bawdiness.  If this is something objectionable to you, please see me so that we might arrange for you to read two alternative tales.  Let me add, however, that, as a result of reading these tales, we will take up this very issue--the objectionable nature of the tales and their place in the classroom (the censorship question, too).  So, even finding them "objectionable," you might find the dialog we'll engage in particularly important, presenting a platform for you to express your views.  So, in this case, you might want to select to read them to have a firmly based understanding of the content so that you can offer your viewpoint in discussion. 

 

---->Again, please see me if you need further clarification on this issue (or 2 alternative selections) before proceeding.

 

HERE'S YOUR TASK:

1.        Review the description of the miller (p. 11) and the reeve (p. 12) in the "General Prologue."

 

2.        Read "The Miller's Tale Prologue" (pp. 59-60) and "The Miller's Tale" (pp. 61-74) and "The Reeve's Tale Prologue" (pp. 75-76) and "The Reeve's Tale" (pp. 76-84).

 

3.         Do WA____ “Reaction to “Miller’s” and “Reeves” Tales (2 sider = 10 pts.)

 NOTE  You might receive a separate hand-out with additional instructions on doing this entry.

 a.   ON THE FRONT SIDE OF THE WA , RESPOND TO ONE OF THESE THREE TOPICS:

 TOPIC ONE

Contrast "The Knight's Tale" with these two tales.  Think of all the ways these tales are different as well as similar.  Which of these three are your favorites?  Does one have any more merit that the other two?  If we only had time for one of these three stories, which one would you choose?  Why?

 TOPIC TWO

Discuss the "earthiness" or "coarseness" or "vulgarity" in these two tales.  Is there any way you could justify the "earthiness"?  Is this something seniors in high school should read?  If you were asked to defend the use of these stories in the curriculum, upon what grounds would you defend it?  Is one of these two stories tamer than the other?  If you know what I mean by the "literary canon," do you think that Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, based on what you've read so far, belongs?

 TOPIC THREE

What "universal truths" do you see in these two stories?  Look carefully at what happens.  Are there winners?  losers?  What is it that Chaucer is trying to get us to pay attention to by reading these stories?  What lessons are there about life in these stories that even have relevance to today's readers--some five hundred (yikes!) years later?

 

 b.  Now, read  William Salinger’s master’s thesis  called "Zest and  Naturalness versus Bitterness in Some of Chaucer's Bawdy Tales."

 

HINT:  you might want to read the study questions you are about to do before you actually start reading it.  That might help you focus and keep track of the answers as you proceed.


 

 

 c.   ON THE BACK SIDE OF THIS WA , you have two tasks:

·        complete the  study questions  about Mr. Salinger's thesis which you were given in class today

·        write a reaction to the article you will read last entitled “Thin Gruel:  How the Language Police Drain the Life and content from Our Texts” by Diane Ravitch.

 

NOTE:  DO NOT WRITE ON THESE HAND-OUTS!


 

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 ASSIGNMENT C7: A LOOK AT GENDER ROLES

Due date ________________

 

1.         Journal entry WA____ “Free choice on Gender roles”  (a 2 sider! = 10 pts.)

 

•You will be given three sets of articles:  one pink set, one blue set, and one yellow set.

 

Skim all the articles so that you know what is basically in each one.

 

THEN, choose which ones in each set you want to respond to in depth.

 

 pink set  articles about women's roles in society, feminism, what girls are taught about gender roles

 

 blue set  articles about men's roles in society, the men’s rights movement, what boys are taught about gender roles

 

 yellow set  articles about society’s views on marriage and relationships, parenting, gender roles in education.

 

•In your journal entry, respond to at least one article in  all three  of the colored sets of articles.

 

•You must write a minimum of 2 sides.

 

•Remember!  You will not get full credit unless you write down your thoughts in this journal about at least one article in    each of the three colored sets.

 

----->PS!  If you have any cool articles like these, please suggest or donate them to add to my collection!


 

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 ASSIGNMENT C8: MEET THE “FIRST FEMINIST” IN LITERATURE

Due date ________________

 

1.        Review the description of the Wife of Bath in the "General Prologue" (pp. 9-10).

 

2.        Read "The Wife of Bath's Prologue" (pp. 153-169--YES!  IT'S LONG!  DON'T SKIP IT!  IT'S ALMOST MORE IMPORTANT THAN THE TALE ITSELF.)  Dame Alice is often called the "first feminist character in literature."  What do you think of that?  What do you think of her?   Is she, as some critics call her, "a militant suffragist rampant for her rights who may lose her cause by exaggeration"?

 

3.        Read "The Wife of Bath's Tale" (pp. 169-176).  Pay special attention to pp. 174-176!  What is it that women supposedly desire most?  What three topics does the old woman take up the last few pages from the end?  Why are these so critical?  Also, what's up with the ending?  Was there really a magic transformation?  What do you (or most people presumably) want to believe?

 

WRITE YOUR REACTIONS TO THE "WIFE OF BATH'S PROLOGUE" AND "WIFE OF BATH'S TALE" HERE (include answers to some of the questions above):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 ASSIGNMENT C9: PARTNER FUN  

Due date ________________

 

1.       Do Journal entry WA____ “Partner Poem”

 

After hearing/reading these poems,"Lessons," "Two Women," and "Local Sensibilities," choose  one  of them as a template for a your own poem inspired by one of these. 

 

 NOTE:  Your poem need not be as long as the original, but should have enough "meat" OR "substance" to get your point across to your audience.

 

FOR MORE FUN AND CREATIVITY, you may choose a partner (or trio--no more!) with whom you will collaborate and write (as well as "perform") the poem together. 

 

You do have the option of doing this completely on your own, too.

 NOTE:  If you do this with a partner, BOTH of you need a copy in your journal!

 

THE "PERFORMANCE" DATE OF THE POEMS IS SET FOR ____________________.

Date


 

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 ASSIGNMENT C10: TALKING TO THE ANIMALS

Due date ________________

 

1.        Re-read the description of the Nun's Priest in the "General Prologue" (p. 4).

 

2.        Read "Nun's Priest's Tale Prologue" (pp. 139-140) and "The Nun's Priest's Tale" (pp. 140-152).

 

3.        Make a chart below.  In the left column, list all of the animals in this story.  On the right, jot down what symbolic significance these animals have traditionally been given in society. (What do you remember about the roles these animals have played in folk tales, fables,         parables, jokes, etc.?)

 

ANIMAL

TRADITIONAL SYMBOLISM

1. rooster

 

 

 

2.

 

 

 

3.

 

 

 

1.

 

 

 

2.

 

 

 

3.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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 ASSIGNMENT C11: MUST YOU WALK THE WALK?

Due date ________________

 

1.        Review the description of the pardoner in the "General Prologue" (p. 13-14).

 

2.        Read "The Pardoner's Tale Prologue" (p. 286-289) and "The Pardoner's Tale." (pp. 290-299.)

 

3.        Discuss with someone (feel free to poll a few people) your ideas on this concept:  "to talk the talk, you must also walk the walk."  What does it mean to you?  Are there any ways at all you might see the pardoner as a positive character worth redemption?

 

WRITE YOUR REACTIONS TO THE "PARDONER'S PROLOGUE" AND "PARDONER'S TALE" HERE (include answers to some of the questions above):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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 ASSIGNMENT C12: DEATH BEFORE DISHONOR?

Due date ________________

 

1.        Re-read the description of the physician in the "General Prologue" (pp. 8-9).

 

2.        Read "The Physician's Tale." (pp. 280-285). 

 

3.        Here are some questions to consider:  What do you think of Virginius?  What did you think of Virginia?  What implications/connections can you see in today's society  of the concept "death before dishonor"?  What are different ways one can be "dishonored"?  Have you ever experienced "issues" with HONOR?  Explain!

 

WRITE YOUR REACTIONS TO THE "PHYSICIAN'S TALE."  (include answers to some of the questions above):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.         REALITY CHECK  Write up a 1/2 page (to share with a partner tomorrow) on the Chaucer       unit thus far!    You may remark on any aspect of the class--not just the literature!  SOME IDEAS:  WHAT HAVE YOU LIKED MOST?  LEAST?  WHY?  WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE SEEING OUR CLASS DO THE SAME OR DIFFERENTLY NEXT UNIT (HAMLET)?

 

HINT!  The teacher will be collecting these 1/2 page "REALITY CHECKS"!

 


 

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ASSIGNMENT C13: FINAL CHAUCER JOURNAL ENTRY

Due date ________________

 

1.       WA____ CHAUCER COMES TO A CLOSE

By the last presentation, each group will have come up with a possible journal entry focused on their tale.  Choose one of these suggested journal entries for this WA ___.  (at least a page).  You may NOT choose the one that your own group suggested.

 

2.       PREPARE YOUR JOURNAL FOR HANDING IN NEXT CLASS PERIOD!

YOU MUST LABEL CERTAIN ITEMS, ANSWER SOME REFLECTIVE QUESTIONS THOUGHTFULLY, ETC.  (SEE THE BACK SIDE OF YOUR ORIGINAL JOURNAL LOG SHEET.  THE SPECIFIC DIRECTIONS FOR THIS PREPARATION, ETC., ARE THERE!  NOTE:  AS ALWAYS WITH MAJOR WORK, EACH DAY LATE IS 10% OFF YOUR GRADE.

·         * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


 

Name_________________________________ Hr. ____  Term ____ Date________________

Wallenberg (rev. term 1, '06)

 

 FRANKENSTEIN ASSIGNMENTS

 

 Assignment F1: BACKGROUND INFORMATION to Frankenstein

Due date ________________

For your first Frankenstein assignment, you will be taking three sets of notes on critical BACKGROUND INFORMATION .

 

1.       NOTES ON THE ROMANTICS

 

EVERYONE will do in-depth notes on the Romantic Period.

 

•Read pp. 565-576 in the black LBT text on "The Romantic Age 1798-1832) and take at least two sides of a page of notes.  (10 pts.)  These should look like NOTES!

Use color, highlight, boxes, bold letters, capitals, space, etc. (so that the notes are easily read by other group members when you compare notes tomorrow)

NOTE  Pay special attention to major events that characterize the Romantic Period, trends and styles, and look especially closely for something to put down in your notes about these critical names:

§         Mary Wollstonecroft and William Godwin,

§         William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge,

§         Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron (George Gordon), and John Keats, and

§         Mary Wollstonecroft Shelley.

 

2.       NOTES ON GROUP ASSIGNED TOPICS

Do additional reading and take at least two sides of a page of notes (worth 10 points) on your group’s assigned topic as listed below.  Once again, these should look like NOTES!  Use color, highlight, boxes, bold letters, capitals, space, etc. (so that the notes are easily read by other group members when you compare notes tomorrow).

 

 GROUP A: THE NEO-CLASSICAL PERIOD EXPERTS

•Read pp. 433-444 in the black LBT on the "Restoration and the Eighteenth Century 1660-1798) and take at least two sides of a page of notes.  (10 pts.)
 

 GROUP B: MARY WOLLSTONECROFT

•Read the two articles on Mary Wollstonecroft and take at least two sides of a page of notes.  (10 pts.)   Be sure to key in on what it was about her life that struck you as most engaging, interesting, critical, etc.

  ( NOTE: If you need these hand-outs, click  HERE.  You will need to scroll down in the PART ONE: FRANKENSTEIN HAND-OUTS PACKET to find this particular hand-out.)

 

 GROUPS C and D: MARY SHELLEY

•Read the articles on Mary Shelley and take at least two sides of a page of notes.  (10 pts.)   Be sure to key in on what it was about her life that struck you as most engaging, interesting, critical, etc.

  ( NOTE: If you need these hand-outs, click  HERE.  You will need to scroll down in the PART ONE: FRANKENSTEIN HAND-OUTS PACKET to find this particular hand-out.)

 GROUP E: THE GOTHIC NOVEL EXPERTS

•Read the article entitled, "Gothic Horror," and take at least two sides of a page of notes.  (10 pts.)

 

  ( NOTE: If you need this hand-out, click  HERE.  You will need to scroll down in the PART ONE: FRANKENSTEIN HAND-OUTS PACKET to find this particular hand-out.)

 

 

3.       NOTES ON THE AUTHOR INTRODUCTION

 

EVERYONE will read and do at least ONE side of a page of in-depth notes on Mary Shelley's "Author's Introduction" (1831) and Percy Shelley's "Preface" (1817) in the Frankenstein text.

§         green CSCC text:  pp. 3-25

§         orange Signet text:  vii-xiv

§         paperback Signet text:  xxi-xxvii

 

Focus on what it was that struck you as most engaging, interesting, critical, etc. 

For example, what made you wonder?  What would you like to ask Mary Shelley about her "Author's Introduction" if you were given the chance? 


 

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 Assignment F2: Rime of Ancient Mariner and Walton’s Narrative

Due date ________________

  1. Read about Coleridge (p. 594 LBT).

 

  1. Read about the Rime of the Ancient Mariner's sound devices (p. 595 LBT)

 

  1. Now, read Coleridge's entire Rime of the Ancient Mariner in LBT (pp. 596-618).

 

§         Answer SQ's 1-9, 11-12 (pp. 618-619) on your own paper.

 

  1.  TAKE A BREAK! (I mean it!  You'll need it!)

 

  1. Read  Walton’s Narrative .

·        green CSCC text:  pp. 25-38

·        orange Signet text:  15-29

·        Signet paperback text:  1-15

 

As you read, jot down information about the characters on your character chart and the page number where each first appears.

 

  1. Read the Prometheus story hand-out.  Jot some ideas/questions about this.

 

  1. Write 3 "FIG" questions on notecards.  Be sure to color-code each card as defined below  and  put your name on each card.  Put your personal answers to each of the three questions on the back of each card.

 F  = FACT QUESTION (pink)

 I   = INTERPRETIVE QUESTION (blue)

 G  = GLOBAL QUESTION (gold)

 

FIG Questions: Levels of Questions

We want students to improve their thinking skills.  This requires that teachers refrain from doing the thinking for them.  It is more important to teach the students to ASK questions than it is for the students to answer questions we ask them.

 

Show students the different types or levels of questions they should ask about a piece of literature.

 

 

F

 

 Level One  Questions: These questions can be answered definitely with facts found in the text or by information readily available in outside sources.

Example: Name the feuding families in Romeo and Juliet.
Example: Where in Italy is Verona located?
Example: What is an apothecary?

Notice that level one question have one correct answer and lend themselves to matching, multiple choice, or fill-in-the-blank tests.  Although they require the student to read the work, they require little thought or understanding.

 

 

 F  = fact question (pink)

 

 

 

 

I

 

 Level Two  Questions: The answers to these questions may be implied rather than stated directly in the reading.  This requires students to make inferences based on specific information they can cite to back up their conclusions.

Example: What is Romeo’s concept of love at the start of the play?
Example: Is Friar Lawrence or the Nurse more to blame for the tragedy?
Example: How do you explain Tybalt’s anger toward Romeo?

Level two questions call for longer answers and more thinking.  They not only require students to do the reading but also force them to consider what they have read.

 

 

 I   = interpretive question (blue)

 

 

 

 

G

 

 Level Three  Questions: These questions are more abstract – they go outside the text and present issues for discussion that bring in the students’ frame of reference.

Example: Are girls Juliet’s age ready to be married?
Example: Is ‘love at first sight’ really love?
Example: Should parents arrange marriages for their children?

Notice that while level three questions will probably promote the most discussion, they may not necessarily require that the students have carefully read the text.

 

 

 G  =global question
(gold)

 

 

If we want students in advanced classes to think about what they have read, we should ask level two and three questions.  Even better, we should get the students themselves to think up their own level two and three questions.


 

 

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 Assignment F3: Chapters 1 – 5 and more Coleridge

Due date ________________

  1. Read about the writing of "Kubla Khan" in LBT p. 620-623 and then Coleridge's poem, "Kubla Khan" (LBT pp. 621-623)

·         Answer questions 1 – 9, page 623.

 

  1. Read Charles Lamb's "The Old Familiar Faces," a poem alluded to in this section of Frankenstein.

 

In your READING LOG (under the ALLUSIONS category), write the title of the poem, "The Old Familiar Faces."   Then, and jot down your understanding of what it's about and how it relates to where we are now in the novel Frankenstein.

   ( NOTE: If you need these hand-outs, click HERE.  You will need to scroll down in the PART TWO: FRANKENSTEIN HAND-OUTS PACKET to find this particular hand-out.)

 

  1. Read  chapters 1 – 5 of VICTOR’S NARRATIVE

·        green CSCC text:  pp. 38-66

·        orange Signet text:  pp. 31-61

·        Signet paperback: p. 17-47

 

1.)    Be able to explain the allusion to the Rime of the Ancient Mariner on p. 59 green/p. 58 orange/p. 44 Signet paperback.  Do this in your READING LOG (under the ALLUSIONS) category.

 

2.)    As you read, jot down information about the characters on your character chart and the page number where each first appears.

 

3.)    Complete

 READING LOG #2 FOR CHAPTERS 1 – 5 of VICTOR’S NARRATIVE.

 

 

  1. Write 3 "FIG" questions (on note cards) over chaps. 1-5. 

·        Be sure to color-code each card as defined below  and  put your name on each card.  Put your personal answers to each of the three questions on the back of each card.

 

 F  = FACT QUESTION (pink)

 I   = INTERPRETIVE QUESTION (blue)

 G  = GLOBAL QUESTION (gold)


 

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 Assignment F4: Chapters 6 – 10 & Lord Byron & Percy Bysshe Shelley

Due date ________________

  1. Read  chapters 6 – 10 of VICTOR’S NARRATIVE

·        green CSCC text:  pp. 62-92

·        orange Signet text:  pp. 62-97

·        Signet paperback:  pp. 48-83

 

As you read, jot down information about the characters on your character chart and the page number where each first appears.

 

  1. Just like in previous assignments,

 READING LOG #3 FOR CHAPTERS 6 – 10 of VICTOR’S NARRATIVE.

 

  1. Write 3 "FIG" questions (on note cards) over chaps. 6 - 10. 

·        Be sure to color-code each card as defined below  and  put your name on each card.  Put your personal answers to each of the three questions on the back of each card.

 F  = FACT QUESTION (pink)

 I   = INTERPRETIVE QUESTION (blue)

 G  = GLOBAL QUESTION (gold)

 

  1.  GROUP ASSIGNED TOPICS

 

 GROUP A: THE BYRON EXPERTS

·        Read about Lord Byron, pp. 624-625 LBT, and Lord Byron's poem, "She Walks in Beauty" (p. 626 LBT) and answer SQ's 1-4 p. 626.

 

·        Read the articles given to you on Prometheus.  Write down at least a page of notes on Prometheus based on articles.    ( NOTE: If you need this hand-out, click HERE.  You will need to scroll down in the PART TWO: FRANKENSTEIN HAND-OUTS PACKET to find this particular hand-out.)

 

·        Actively read Byron's poem "Prometheus."  (You will need to read Byron's poem "Prometheus" on the goldenrod Supplementary Poetry with Frankenstein hand-out.     NOTE: If you need this hand-out, click HERE.  You will need to scroll down in the PART TWO: FRANKENSTEIN HAND-OUTS PACKET to find this particular hand-out.

 

·        Under the 4 "She Walks in Beauty" SQ's, write a response to Byron's poem "Prometheus" and how this poem as well as "She Walks in Beauty" relate to Frankenstein (Write at least 1/2 page).

 

 GROUP B: THE DON JUAN EXPERTS

·        Read about  mock epic poems, p. 632.  Then read from "Don Juan," pp. 633-635 and answer SQ's 1-5, p. 635.

 

·        Under the SQ's, write a response to this poem (at least 1/2 page).  Also, include how this poem may relate to Frankenstein.


 

 GROUP C: THE PERCY SHELLEY EXPERTS

·        Read about Percy Bysshe Shelley and odes, pp. 636-637, LBT, and then Shelley's poem, "Ozymandias" (p. 638 LBT) and answer SQ's 1-4 p. 638.

 

·        Then, look up the word "mutability."  Write down this word and its definition under your SQ's on "Ozymandias." 

 

·        Read both Shelley's and Wordworth's poems, both called "Mutability."  Compare and contrast the two poems  (at least 1/2 a page) under your definition of "mutability."

 

·        Reread the pages in Frankenstein where Shelley's "Mutability" appears:

•green CSCC text:  p. 89

•orange Signet text:  pp. 93-94

•Signet paperback:  pp. 79-80 paperback

 

·        On the back of your page of SQ's and ideas about the two poems called "Mutability," discuss how both "Ozymandias" and both versions of "Mutability" may relate to Frankenstein.

 

 GROUP D: THE PERCY SHELLEY “ODE”EXPERTS

·        Read about Percy Bysshe Shelley and "odes," pp. 636-637, LBT, and then Shelley's poem, "Ode to the West Wind" (pp. 640-643 LBT)

·        Answer SQ's 1-9 p. 643.

·        Under the SQ's, write a response to this poem (at least 1/2 page).

·        Also, include how this poem may relate to Frankenstein.

 

 GROUP E: THE POT LUCK GROUP

·        •THIS IS YOUR LUCKY DAY!  You are to choose another group's assignment.

 

·        Everyone in the group can do the same assignment or choose individually from letters A-D.  Follow directions as outlined above.


 

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Assignment F5: Chapters 11 – 16

Due date ________________

  1. Read  chapters 11 – 16 of THE CREATURE’S NARRATIVE

·        green CSCC text:  pp. 92-124

·        orange Signet text:  pp. 93-137

·        Signet paperback text: pp. 84-123

 

  1. Just like in previous assignments,

READING LOG #4 FOR CHAPTERS 11 – 16.

 

  1. Write 3 "FIG" questions (on note cards) over chaps. 6 - 10. 

·        Be sure to color-code each card as defined below  and  put your name on each card.  Put your personal answers to each of the three questions on the back of each card.

 F  = FACT QUESTION (pink)

 I   = INTERPRETIVE QUESTION (blue)

 G  = GLOBAL QUESTION (gold)

 

Assignment F6: LOGIC INFO FOR POSITION PAPER

Due date ________________

 

You are to now begin working on the position paper in earnest.  Hopefully, you have done some preliminary research on your topic and begun to find information brought up in Frankenstein which can be used in your paper.

 

The purpose of this next part of this assignment is to learn (or review) some writing strategies which are necessary components of position papers:  the use of logic to support an argument  and  how to write persuasively.

 

  1. Read chapter 8, "Logic and Writing," (pp. 236-252) in the gray 12th grade edition of the book English Writing Skills.  As you read, take at least two sides of a page of notes (worth10 pts.) and do the exercises listed below.

 

  1. Do the following exercises:

·        Writing Practice #1 (pp. 239-240)--do all TEN,

·        Writing Practice #2 (p. 241)--choose only ONE of the three situations given,

·        •Writing Practice #3 (p. 245)--choose any THREE of those statements given,  and when you are done with your notes on the fallacies,

·        Do "Exercise 3:  Persuasive Writing: Identifying Fallacies" either on your own notebook paper or if you are given a hand-out on the hand-out of Persuasive Writing Exercises given out in class (marked pp. 43-44 on your hand-out).

             NOTE  You will be turning the Writing Practices in with your notes.


 

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Assignment F7: READINGS on Chapters 11 – 16 and PERSUASIVE INFO

Due date ________________

  1. Do the reading and questions for the selections below to which your group is assigned.

 GROUP A

·        Read about John Milton on p. 404 and two of Milton's sonnets.

 

·        "When I Consider How My Light is Spent" (p. 406 LBT)

- Answer your choice of  six  of the 7 study questions listed on p. 406.

 

·        “On His Having Arrived at the Age of Twenty Three" (p. 408 LBT)

- Answer your choice of  six  of the 13 study questions listed on p. 409.

 

 GROUPS B and C

·        Read about John Milton on p. 404 and then read from Milton's poem, "Paradise Lost" (pp. 411-418 LBT) and answer SQ's 1-12 p. 419.

 

 GROUPS D and E

·        Read about Goethe's Faust pp. 676-677, LBT

- Jot down some notes. 

 

·        Then, read about Christopher Marlowe and about the Faust legend, pp. 208-209 LBT.

 

·        Then read from "The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus" pp. 210-212, LBT, and do SQ's 1-8 on p. 213.

 

 

 

SEE NEXT PAGE FOR THE

PERSUASIVE PART OF THIS ASSIGNMENTà

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

continuation of ASSIGNMENT F7:  PERSUASIVE INFO

 

The purpose of this next part of this assignment is to learn (or review) some writing strategies for writing persuasively.

 

  1. Read chapter 9, "Persuasive Writing," (pp. 258-275) in the gray 12th grade edition of the book English Writing Skills.  As you read, take at least two sides of a page of notes (worth 10 pts.).
  2. Do the following exercises:

·        Do Writing Practice #1 (p. 262)--you need to find only ONE ad to attach to this Writing Practice #1 (a product ad  or  a public relations ad), and

 

·        Writing Practice #2 (p. 264), and

 

·        Writing Practice #3 (p. 266), and

 

·        Writing Practice #4 (p. 269)--Choose either ONLY ONE of the topics given in the gray book  or  choose a Frankenstein position paper topic.  

 

You will be turning in these writing practices with your notes.

 

 

  1. After reading the model persuasive essay on pp. 273-274, answer the 6 "Think and Discuss" questions on p. 275.

You will be turning these questions in.

 

 

5.     Now would be a good time to go reread the packet outlining the position paper.  NOTE:   You will be turning in

·        your  PROPOSITION  (see pp. 267-269)

·        a  list of arguments  for your position

·        a  list of opposing arguments  you'd predict the other side may come up with. 

 

This is due on __________________ (approximately a week before the final paper is due).  Ask your teacher for the exact due date for this.


 

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Assignment F8: MORE ARTICLES AND A JOURNAL

Due date ________________

  1. Read Eileen A. Simmons' article, "Frankenstein for the Twenty-First Century:  An Exploration of Contemporary Issues"  AND  jot down a page of notes.  Be sure to record any ideas this article gives you for the position paper or which seem otherwise valuable.

 

  1. Read Paul A. Cantor and Michael Valdez Moses' article, "Teaching Frankenstein from the Creature's Perspective"  AND  jot down a page of notes.

 

3.      JOURNAL:  M.I.B. (Most Important Books)

In chapters 11-16, the creature identifies 4 books that have had a profound influence on him.  Interview 4 people (representing 4 different decades of life and who are preferably from different "walks" of life).  Ask them what their personal "top four" books would be.  By "top books," I mean books which have profoundly affected them  or  books that have such powerful messages that they are books others must read, too,  or  are books so vital to a culture that if all other books suddenly disappeared, these would be the last four books chosen to remain in existence.

 

Be sure to write up the criteria/reasons each person gives for each book and a little about what the book is all about.

 

After writing up the results of what you found others chose, identify your own top 4, too.  Explain why you chose these 4.


 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Assignment F9: Chapters 17 – 21 and Wordsworth

Due date ________________

  1. Read  chapters 17 – 21 of VICTOR’S NARRATIVE

·        green CSCC text:  pp. 124-155

·        orange Signet text:  pp. 138-175

·        Signet paperback:  pp. 124-162

 

  1. Just like in previous assignments,

 READING LOG #5 FOR CHAPTERS 17 – 21 VICTOR’S NARRATIVE.

 

  1. Write 3 "FIG" questions (on note cards) over chaps. 6 - 10. 

·        Be sure to color-code each card as defined below  and  put your name on each card.  Put your personal answers to each of the three questions on the back of each card.

 F  = FACT QUESTION (pink)

 I   = INTERPRETIVE QUESTION (blue)

 G  = GLOBAL QUESTION (gold)

  1. Read about Wordsworth on pp. 578-579 LBT and Wordsworth's poem, "Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey (p. 580-585 LBT) and answer SQ's 1-6 p. 585

 

  1. Read Wordsworth's poem, "The World is Too Much With Us" (p. 589 LBT) and answer SQ's 1-4 p. 589.

 

  1. Read Anthony Backes' article, "Revisiting Frankenstein:  A Study in Reading and Education."

As you read, jot down at least 1/2 page of notes on the information that struck you as interesting, important, etc., or which might be valuable for the POSITION PAPER.  Do these notes after the Wordsworth study questions.


 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Assignment F10: Chapters 22 – 24 (stop before Letter 4) and Keats

Due date ________________

  1. Read chapters 22 to almost all of 24 of VICTOR’S NARRATIVE

 NOTE PAGE NUMBERS CAREFULLY!  DO NOT FINISH THE BOOK.

·        green CSCC text:  pp. 155-174

·        orange Signet text:  pp. 177-199

·        Signet paperback:  pp. 163-186

 

  1. Just like in previous assignments, complete

 READING LOG #6 FOR CHAPS 22 – almost all 24 VICTOR’S NARRATIVE.

 

  1. Write 3 "FIG" questions (on note cards) over chaps. 6 - 10. 

·        Be sure to color-code each card as defined below  and  put your name on each card.  Put your personal answers to each of the three questions on the back of each card.

 F  = FACT QUESTION (pink)

 I   = INTERPRETIVE QUESTION (blue)

 G  = GLOBAL QUESTION (gold)

 

  1. Do Group Work as assigned below:

 GROUP A

Read about John Keats, pp. 650-651, LBT, and Keats' sonnet, "When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be" (p. 655 LBT) and answer SQ's 1-5, p. 655.

 

 GROUPS B & C

Read about John Keats, pp. 650-651, LBT, and read Keats' poem, "Ode on a Grecian Urn," (pp. 662-664 LBT) and answer SQ's 1-7 p. 664.

 

 GROUP D

Read about John Keats, pp. 650-651, LBT, and read Keats' poem, "Endymion" (hand-out).  Write down a 1/2 page response to this poem.  Include any questions you have about this poem, any other poems by Keats or about Keats' life.

 

 GROUP E

Read about John Keats, pp. 650-651, LBT, and read Keats' poem, "Ode to a Nightingale" (hand-out), and write down a 1/2 page response to this poem.  Include any questions you have about this poem, any other poems by Keats or about Keats' life.


 

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Assignment F11: finish Frankenstein and some FINAL THOUGHTS

Due date ________________

  1. Read  the end of letter 4 of WALTON’S NARRATIVE

·        green CSCC text:  pp. 174-185

·        orange Signet text:  pp. 199-211

·        Signet paperback:  pp. 186-198

 

  1. Complete  READING LOG #7 FOR END OF FRANKENSTEIN

 

  1. Write 3 "FIG" questions (on note cards) over chaps. 6 - 10. 

·        Be sure to color-code each card as defined below  and  put your name on each card.  Put your personal answers to each of the three questions on the back of each card.

 F  = FACT QUESTION (pink)

 I   = INTERPRETIVE QUESTION (blue)

 G  = GLOBAL QUESTION (gold)

 

  1. Do the group work as outlined below:

 GROUP A

Read Miller's "Foreward:  The Future of Frankenstein" (pp. v-xviii in Signet paperback).  Take at least one side of a page of notes.

 

 GROUP B

Read Bloom's "Afterward:  The Future of Frankenstein" (pp. 199-210 in Signet paperback  or  pp. 212 in orange Signet text).  Take at least one side of a page of notes.

 

 GROUP C

Read Dante's Inferno, canto 26.  Then go back to the novel and reread the speech Frankenstein gives Walton's men (p.  178 green / pp. 203-204 orange / pp. 190-191 Signet paperback).  What motivates Victor's desire for knowledge compared to what motivates Ulysses?  In at least a page, compare and contrast Ulysses' speech with Victor Frankenstein's speech.  How does this relate to Frankenstein?

 

 GROUP D

Ask your teacher for one of the literary theory articles (choices are these: reader response, Marxist, psychoanalytic, and feminist) about FrankensteinRespond to the article in at least a page.

 

 GROUP E

Read one of these selections by Anne Mellor:  "Frankenstein and the Sublime"  or  chapter 4 "Promethean Politics"  or  her chapter 7 "Problems of Perception" (from her book Mary Shelley: Her Life, Her Fiction, and Her Monsters)  or  Kenneth Branagh’s article “Frankenstein Regained or  another article your teacher might have dug up for you!  Respond to your selection in at least a page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(rev.  5/20/06)

HELLO, HAMLET!    ASSIGNMENTS

 

 ASSIGNMENT H1: REBIRTH, REGROUP, REJUVENATE!

SHAKESPEARE IS ALIVE AND WELL TODAY

Due date ________________

 

  1.  NOTES ON HAMLET BACKGROUND MATERIAL:  ELIZABETHAN ENGLAND, THE RENAISSANCE, SHAKESPEARE, AND THEATRE

Each Hamlet group will be assigned one background reading assignment out of the ones listed below (a-g). 

Circle the one you are assigned.

 

 THE TASKS – What to Read and Take Notes On.

 

 GROUP                                                         YOUR TASK FOR YOUR NOTE

 

________    A  NORTON EXPERT – You need to check out this book from your teacher!

Read and take notes from the Norton, vol. 6.  Read "The Sixteenth Century 1485-1603" (pp. 395-top of p. 406 and mid pp. 409 - 413).   Also, read "William Shakespeare 1564-1616" (pp. bottom of 801 - 803).

REMEMBER:  YOU ARE THE ONLY GROUP WHO WILL HAVE NOTES ON THIS MATERIAL.  

 

    B  LBT BACKGROUND EXPERT and SHAKESPEARE’S BIOGRAPHY

Read and take notes on the information from these TWO sources:

·        LBT black textbook pp. 191-201; 224-225  Take notes!

·        the chapter, "William Shakespeare 1564-1616,"(pp. bottom of 801 - 803), in the Norton Anthology of English Literature (check this book out from your teacher)

YOU ARE THE ONLY GROUP WHO WILL HAVE NOTES ON THIS MATERIAL.   

 

        _______    C  BIOGRAPHY and AUTHORSHIP CONTROVERSY and CANON

In your Signet Classic edition of Hamlet, read and take notes on

·        "Shakespeare:  An Overview"--sections "Biographical Sketch,"

·        "A Note on the Anti-Stratfordians, Especially Baconians and Oxfordians," and

·        "The Shakespeare Canon" on pp. vii-xviii (new book).

YOU ARE THE ONLY GROUP WHO WILL HAVE NOTES ON THIS MATERIAL.   

 

 

_________  D  SHAKESPEARE'S THEATER

In your Signet Classic edition of Hamlet, read and take notes on

"Shakespeare:  An Overview", "Shakespeare's Theater" and "A Note on the Use of Boy Actors in Female Roles" on pp. xxvi-xxxvi  (new book).

YOU ARE THE ONLY GROUP WHO WILL HAVE NOTES ON THIS MATERIAL.   

 

            ________    E. SHAKESPEARE'S DRAMATIC LANGUAGE:  COSTUMES, GESTURES AND SILENCES,

                                    PROSE AND POETRY

In your Signet Classic edition of Hamlet, read and take notes on

"Shakespeare's Dramatic Language:  Costumes, Gestures and Silences; Prose And Poetry", "The Play Text as a Collaboration" and "Editing Texts" on pp. xxxvi-liv (new book).  

YOU ARE THE ONLY GROUP WHO WILL HAVE NOTES ON THIS MATERIAL.   

 

            _______    F SHAKESPEARE ON THE STAGE

In your Signet Classic edition of Hamlet, read and take notes on

"Shakespeare on the Stage" on pp. liv-lxi   (new book)  AND  Sylvan Barnet's article, "Hamlet on Stage and Screen" in the new book on pp. 239-256

YOU ARE THE ONLY GROUP  WHO WILL HAVE NOTES ON THIS MATERIAL.   

 

                _______    G.  SHAKESPEARE'S ENGLISH

In your Signet Classic edition of Hamlet, read and take notes on

"Shakespeare:  An Overview"--"Shakespeare's English" on pp. xviii-xxv (new book).

YOU ARE THE ONLY GROUP WHO WILL HAVE NOTES ON THIS MATERIAL.

  

  1. Look over the hand-out “Words, Words, Words.”  Highlight some important, amusing, or bizarre

information from this hand-out.  Plan to share your selections in class tomorrow!

 

  1.  H-WA (means Hamlet WA____ QUOTES TO CONSIDER (10 points = 2 sides)

 front side of your entry :

Read all the boxes of quotations on the pink "Quotes Along with Hamlet" sheet as well as the ideas associated with them which appear underneath each quote.  Choose one box, and write at least a one page reaction to it.

 

 back side of your entry :

Read all the famous quotes from Hamlet on your "Significant Quotes from Hamlet" hand-out.  Circle any that are familiar to you.  Choose three.  For each one you've chosen, tell what you think that it means (out of context) as well as how it connects to you personally.  You may, of course, do more than three.  Your discussion of the 3 should equal a full page.


 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 ASSIGNMENT H2: THE FIRST SCENE – Who’s There?

Due date ________________

 

  1.  Read yellow hand-out “Actively Reading or Marking a Textbook.”

Use the suggestions in this hand-out and the information listed below to help you decide what you should mark as you actively read HAMLET, Act I, sc. i, pp. 33-40/new book pp. 3-10.

 

  1.  Familiarize yourself with the following:

 THEMES AND MOTIFS  YOU SHOULD BE LOOKING FOR AND MARKING IN YOUR HAMLET BOOK AS YOU READ

           

Make a  theme chart  in the front of your book. (Use the following abbreviations--A/R or O or H/H, etc.--to mark these themes in the actual text when you see them.  If you are assigned to focus on only  ONE THEME , look for and mark any examples in your text of the theme your group has been assigned!)

 A/R  (appearance vs. reality)

 O  (order)

 H/H  (head vs. heart)

 P/K  (power and kingship)

 F/D  (free will vs. divine will or destiny)

 

HERE'S A QUICK EXPLANATION OF THE  THEMES .

 A/R Appearance vs. Reality:  things are not always what they seem. Sometimes we think we know what is going on, but in reality, it might really only be perception.

In Hamlet, it says:

". . . for there is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so."

 Hamlet, II, ii, p. 78/new book p. 48

More A/R examples:

'Tis too much proved, that with devotion's visage

And pious action we do sugar o'er

The devil himself.  

Hamlet, III, i, p. 93/new book p. 53

 

"Lord, we know what we are, but not what we may be.”

Hamlet, IV, v, p. 134/new book p. 104

 

"Though this be madness, yet there is method in't.”

Hamlet, II, ii, p. 77/new book p. 47


 

 

 O Order:  when the order of the state, a community, a family, or even one's personal order is upset, it must be put back into order again no matter what the cost.

 

In Hamlet, it says: “Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.”

Hamlet, I, iv, p. 57/new book p. 27

 

 H/H Head vs. Heart:  sometimes there is a great conflict between one's intellect or capacity to reason and one's inside emotions, heart, gut, feelings.  It is difficult to balance the two.  When we act more out of our instincts and emotions and do not opt to use our "God-like" reason, we are often thought of as more animals than humans.

 

In Hamlet, it says:

"What is a man,

If his chief good and market of his time

Be but to sleep and feed?  A beast, no more.

Sure he that made us with such large discourse,

Looking before and after, gave us not

That capability and godlike reason

To fust in us unused."                         Hamlet, IV, iv, p. 131/new book p. 101

 

"poor Ophelia

Divided from herself and her fair judgment,

Without the which we are pictures or mere beasts;"

Hamlet, IV, v, p. 135/new book p. 105

 

 P/K Power / Kingliness:  the notion of who has power and control and how those who have power (most especially a king) is a big issue in this world.  What is the best way to use and not abuse power?  What is a good king?  What about the usurpation of power?

 

In Hamlet, it says:

"Never alone

Did the King sign, but with a general groan."

Hamlet, III, iii, p. 113/new book p. 83

 

"There's such divinity doth hedge a king

That treason can but peep to what it would

Acts little of his will."                         Hamlet, IV, v, p. 137/new book p. 107

 

 F/D Free Will vs. Destiny:  how much is what we do and what happens to us actually under the power of our own free will?  Or does Destiny or Fate (often attributed to God's divine destiny) ultimately control our actions?  Or is there the possibility that both can happen?

 

 In Hamlet, it says:

"Our wills and fates do so contrary run

That our devices still are overthrown;

Our thoughts are ours, their ends none of our own."

Hamlet, III, ii, p. 105/new book p. 75


 

 

"The time is out of joint.  O cursed spite,

That ever I was born to set it right!"

Hamlet, I, v, p. 64/new book p. 34

 

"Our indiscretion sometime serves us well

When our deep plots do pall, and that should learn us

There's a divinity that shapes our ends,

Rough-hew them how we will."          Hamlet, V, ii, p. 160/new book p. 130

 

"There is special

providence in the fall of a sparrow."

Hamlet, V, ii, p. 167/new book p. 137

 

HERE IS A QUICK EXPLANATION OF  MOTIFS

 

o       As you read, you should look for/keep track of motifs.  Motifs are not themes;  they are recurring situations used to help develop the theme.  An example might be the "lovers' triangle" in Chaucer's "Knight's Tale."

 

Make a  motif chart  in the back of your book.  Put the page numbers where these motifs appear next to them.  In the margins of your text, write the word "motif" beside the spot where the motif appears.

 

Here are some of the  motifs and a page number  where you can find some of them:      (There will be more instances and more motifs.)

a.       references to ghosts (p. 34/new book p. 4)

b.      omens foreshadowing the future (p. 36/new book p. 6)

c.       disguised characters and spying (either physically or otherwise)

d.      decay/rotting/sickness/disease/poisoning imagery (p. 34/new book p. 4)

e.       ears (p. 34/new book p. 4)

f.        trouble comes in multiples (3's usually) (p. 36/new book p. 6)

g.       the cock crows to signal warning (p. 39/new book p. 9)

h.       "calm before the storm"

i.         death being the great equalizer

j.        women being the root of evil (temptation of powers of the flesh)

 

  1.  READ OVER THE “DRAMATIS PERSONAE p. 32 / new book p. 2

As you read, refer back to this cast list each time you meet a new character.  I suggest that in the left hand margin, jot down the first page where each character appears.  After each character's name, add a short description of him or her when you know something more about him/her--position, personality, relationship, etc.

 

NOW, YOU MIGHT TAKE A QUICK BREAK BEFORE YOU BEGIN TO READ THE TEXT.  NOW THAT YOU ARE READY, BEGIN!


 

  1.  ACTIVELY READ HAMLET – Act I / sc. i.   (pp. 33-40 / new book pp. 3-10)

 

REMEMBER TO FOLLOW SUGGESTIONS ON THE YELLOW ACTIVE READING SHEET!  ALSO, REMEMBER TO MARK A "Q" IN THE MARGIN FOR ANY OF THE SIGNIFICANT QUOTES THAT APPEAR ON YOUR SIGNIFICANT QUOTATIONS SHEET.

 

NOTE:  If you are totally confused/frustrated, try these suggestions:

a.      read it over many times

b.      read the footnotes carefully

c.        call your study partner and compare ideas as to what's going on

d.      try reading it out loud

e.       mark any questions you have in the margins with a ? to remember to ask about it in class tomorrow

f.        take note of the suggestions on the previous pages

 

  1. WHEN YOU ARE DONE,  REVIEW THE SCENE  BY RE-READING WHAT YOU HAVE HIGHLIGHTED AND MARKED. 

 

  1. Be prepared for a quiz on pp. 33-40/new book pp. 3-10 tomorrow.  Expect that no notes or book use will be allowed.

 

 

  1. Take the Hamlet Selector Quiz!  Get the website address in class.  Take the quiz and print out (or jot down) the names of the characters you are given that are supposedly most like you.  DO NOT READ THE DESCRIPTIONS OF THE CHARACTERS.  Wait until later!  Otherwise, you may find out more about what happens in the play than you want/need to know at this time.  You do NOT want to spoil the mystery!

 


 

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 ASSIGNMENT H3: HEAR YE!  THE KING IS ABOUT TO SPEAK!

Due date ________________

 

1.      Read Act I, sc. ii-ii, pp. 40- 1/2 of p. 44/new book pp. 10- 1/2 of 14. 

STOP RIGHT BEFORE HAMLET'S FIRST SOLILOQUY (line 129).

 MARK THEMES!  MARK SIGNIFICANT EVENTS!  MARK!

 

2.       OPENING COURT SCENE: 3 Q’s

In the spaces below, answer the following 3 questions. These may appear on a quiz tomorrow! 

 

 1.   Name 3 things the King raises or brings up in his long speech on pp. 40-41/new book pp. 10-11.

                                    a.  _______________________________________________________

 

                                    b.  _______________________________________________________

 

                                    c.  _______________________________________________________

 

 2.   What does Laertes request of the King?

 

 3.   Name at least 3 major insults that the King hurls at Hamlet.  (Questions to consider:  What might his agenda be?  What does it seem Claudius and Hamlet's relationship is like?)

                                    a.  _______________________________________________________

 

                                    b.  _______________________________________________________

 

                                    c.  _______________________________________________________

 

 JOT DOWN YOUR THOUGHTS!   In the space below, jot down any questions / comments / observations / predictions / personal connections, etc. that come to mind while you are doing the reading or after the reading.

                                    a.  _______________________________________________________

 

                                    b.  _______________________________________________________

 

                                    c.  _______________________________________________________

 

 

 

3.       Do the AP PRACTICE QUESTIONS FOR PASSAGE 1 (questions 1-7)

Do not merely answer the questions.  Fill the margins of each question with justification.  Also, mark relevant evidence in the actual passages as well.  Be prepared to defend your personal answers in class!


 

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 ASSIGNMENT H4: HAMLET’S FIRST SOLILOQUY and GHOST DEBRIEF

Due date ________________

 

1.      Read pp. 44-49/new book 14-19.

2.      Do Soliloquy #1 Paraphrase   (pp. 44-49/new book 14-19; lines 129-159)

·        You need to take out the blue SOLILOQUY PACKET you received in class.  This packet will be used each time we will be paraphrasing each one of Hamlet's famous soliloquies and also Claudius' soliloquy.  By "paraphrase," I mean putting Shakespeare's words into your own words.  For every soliloquy, you will also be writing a short summary in a  box  worksheet.

·        You will do this line by line.  Be sure to read any available footnotes for help!  There is space reserved under each line for you to write your line by line translation.

Example:        line      original wording

129      O that this too too sullied flesh would melt,

 

                         line     your translation

129      I wish my solid flesh would melt.  (Or, I wish I could die.)

·        You are to translate, not interpret!

·        Write this in first person!  You are Hamlet talking!

 

3.       Complete take-home quiz  over pp 40 – 49 / new book pp. 10 – 19.

 

4.       Do the AP PRACTICE QUESTIONS FOR PASSAGE 2 (questions 8-15)

Do not merely answer the questions.  Fill the margins of each question with justification.  Also, mark relevant evidence in the actual passages as well.  Be prepared to defend your personal answers in class!


 

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 ASSIGNMENT H5: “He was a man; take him for all and all.”

Due date ________________

 

1.      Read Act I, sc. 3-4 on pp. 49-57/new book pp. 19-27 (Oops ! not "37" as it says in the blue HW packet.  This is a silly, unfortunate misprint!)

MARK/HIGHLIGHT YOUR BOOK!

 

2.      Complete take-home quiz  QUESTIONS _____ to _____.

 

3.       6 BITS OF ADVICE ASSIGNMENT

Mark in your book and then list in the CHART below at least six pieces of advice in Polonius's speech to Laertes on page 51/new book page 21 (starting w/ line 59) to page 52/new book page 22  (ending with line 80). Beside each piece of advice, write down what is  positive  about this piece of advice  AND  what is  potentially negative .

 

Your chart should look like this:

 

Advice

Line #

What’s positive?

What’s negative?

1.

 

 

 

 

 

2.

 

 

 

 

 

3.

 

 

 

 

 

4.

 

 

 

 

 

5.

 

 

 

 

 

6.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.  JOURNAL TIME!   H-WA___:  ADVICE

Reflect on times you've been given advice  and have given advice.  Specifically, read the packet of GRAY articles about the special unique situation of being a senior (or a parent of a senior) and what kinds of challenges you’re in for as you try to “survive” and “thrive” this unusual year.  Have you been hearing a lot of advice about how to make the most of your senior year?  What about advice about going away to college?  Is any of the advice you’ve been hearing similar to Polonius' advice to Laertes?  Which parts? 

 

CHOOSE TO DO EITHER  A  or  B  BELOW for the WA.

 

A.     Write about your personal ideas about advice and what struck you in the gray articles.  Perhaps you could write about the advice you would like to hear rather than that which you are hearing?  Or what advice are you giving yourself about next year?  Or what advice would you give your best friend?  Or you can write a letter of advice to your parents (whether you actually give it to them to read is your option) on how to best "handle" you at this time in your life or on how they might best cope with grieving your leaving them.  Anything about advice goes here!

B.     Surprise Letter to Be Opened Your First Night at College   Have someone else do this part of the journal for you!   What?  Yes, I mean it.  Give your parent(s) or someone else a sheet of paper (A SEPARATE SHEET OF PAPER FROM THE ONE YOU USED FOR POLONIUS' ADVICE).  Ask this person to write you a letter of advice  about college, life, love, etc.  You may or may not decide to read it now.  You could tuck it away to save to be read your first night at college!  Many students did this last year and both the students and parents thought it was really cool!  NOTE:  You may seal this in an envelope if you like. You might want to ask/let your parents read the gray packet of articles about the special unique situation of being a senior (or a parent of a senior) and what kinds of challenges seniors may be in for as they and parents try to "survive" and "thrive" this special senior year. The due date is any time, really. I won't be collecting this assignment until the entire journal collection comes in near the end of the course. I will personally NOT read your letter. I will just trust that it is a parent advice/words of wisdom letter when you turn in a letter in an envelope that says "TO _________ (your name) TO BE OPENED THE FIRST NIGHT AWAY AT COLLEGE."

 

5.  THE VICIOUS MOLE SPEECH

In the box provided below (or as one of the EXTRA CREDIT opportunities in the SOLILOQUY PACKET), summarize (do not paraphrase/translate line by line!) Hamlet's long speech in answer to Horatio's question on p. 55 (old book)/new book p. 25.

Basically you are to explain what he is telling  Horatio. Then, give several modern day examples  of the point he is making.  The examples may be ones that have actually happened in  society today, your own life, or ones that you can imagine happening.

Be prepared to share this in class tomorrow.

 

THE "VICIOUS MOLE" PARAPHRASE & MODERN EXAMPLES:

 

 

 

 

ASSIGNMENT H6: WHEN IS A TRAGEDY NOT A TRAGEDY?

Due date ________________

 

 REFLECTION AND NOTES ON TOPIC: “Tragedy – MYTHS AND REALITY” (5 pts.)

1.      First 1/3 to ½ page:  Start by reflecting on what you know about the concept of "tragedy."  Jot down some ideas in your journal.  What do you think most people think of when they hear the word, "tragedy"?  Give some examples of either tragedies you have witnessed, heard about, or can think up hypothetically.  Now, consider what tragedy means in the literary sense.  If a professor tells you that your class will now read the tragedies, Samson Agonistes, by John Milton, or Death of a Salesman, by Arthur Miller, or One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, by Ken Kesey, what do you expect will be the commonalities of these works?  Jot down some idea/predictions about a literary work called "tragedy."

 

2.      Rest of the page and as much space as it takes: Now, let's fill in the gaps between society's notion of tragedy, the Aristotelian concept, and actively read the material in the TRAGEDY AND THEATRE PACKET.  Take some notes on the articles included in this packet.

 

3.      If assigned, complete the  take-home quiz on this packet.

--You must write in page numbers (or you will lose a flat 2 points)

--If you need to, you may look back at your notes or the packet for help.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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 ASSIGNMENT H7: HAMLET MEETS THE GHOST!

Due date ________________

 

 

 

1.      Read Act I, sc. 5 pp. 58-64/new book pp. 28-34.   

MARK/HIGHLIGHT YOUR BOOK!

 

4.      Complete take-home quiz  QUESTIONS _____ to _____.

 

2.       Soliloquy #2 Paraphrase

Paraphrase Hamlet's second soliloquy, which is on p. 61/new book pp. 31  (lines 92-112)

·        Remember, as always, to double-space, number the lines using the original line numbers, and to translate (not interpret) using first person!

·        Also, remember to summarize the soliloquy on the SOLILOQUY BOX WORKSHEET.

 

3.       Do the AP PRACTICE QUESTIONS FOR PASSAGE 3:  Questions 16-23

Do not merely answer the questions.  Fill the margins of each question with justification.  Also, mark relevant evidence in the actual passages as well.  Be prepared to defend your personal answers in class!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSIGNMENT H8: CLOSURE ON ACT I / HELLO ACT II!

Due date ________________

 

1.       H-WA____ TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION AFTER HAMLET ACT I

After reading Act I, three topics often come to mind.  The idea of grief, the confusion of appearance vs. reality, and the question of following the rules are topics for this journal entry.  Write at least a page on one of these three topics.  Be prepared to share this entry in class tomorrow.

 

 TOPIC 1: GRIEF  

There are many ideas about grief presented in Act I from Claudius' idea that to "persever in obstinate condolement is a course of impious stubbornness" (p. 43/new book p. 13) to Hamlet's frustration that people put on appearance of grief or "actions that a man might play" (p. 43/new book p. 13).  Analyze the differing views about the grieving process in the first act as well as what our society today seems to allow as acceptable or not acceptable when it comes to dealing with grief.  Whose opinions or what ideas about grief seem most acceptable to you personally?  You might include a real life example of grief that you've witnessed.

 

 TOPIC 2: APPEARANCE vs. REALITY  

One of the features in many of Shakespeare's works is the fact that people have difficulty distinguishing between appearance and reality--between what merely SEEMS and what IS.  Many characters in Hamlet (including Hamlet himself?) are, have been, or will become victims of delusion.  From the time Hamlet first says, "Seems, madam?  Nay, it is.  I know not 'seems,'" (p. 43/new book p. 13) this play never stops bringing up the difficulties people have in sorting out appearance and reality.  Discuss how this theme is present in the first act of Hamlet.  Give plenty of examples.  Also, discuss some examples from your own life when you or someone you know had difficulty distinguishing what seemed to be true with what was true.  Finally, what do you think Shakespeare is getting at by introducing this theme?

 

 TOPIC 3: FOLLOWING THE RULES

The Elizabethan society adhered very strictly to the notion that everything has its place.  In fact, the universe was described as being like a "great chain of being" where everything fit just right with everything else.  If one link was out of place, the whole society would be affected.  The universe will work in mysterious ways to right itself and restore order (and the rules) once again.  In a sense, Denmark is a microcosm for this universe.  Hamlet refers to an "unweeded garden" (p. 44/new book p. 14) early on in the play.   So, society dictated that one had to follow the "rules" to ensure that everything ran smoothly.  There are rules to govern a country, to keep order in one's own household, to keep harmony among people, even to keep an individual personally balanced and happy.  Polonius even gives us a list of rules he's passing on to his son, Laertes, to keep in mind before he's off to France.  Discuss how this idea of rules is present in the first act in Hamlet and what some of the dangers are of breaking the rules.  Also, discuss how some of these ideas are still present in our society today or whatever rules there are not that definitely did not exist back then.  For example, is "to thine own self be true"  (p. 52/new book p. 22) as applicable to us today as Polonius asserts it was back then?  A recent ad campaign today asserts that "sometimes you just gotta break the rules."  What do you think of that?  Would any characters in the play agree? 

 

 2.  Begin reading Act II  pp. 65 – top of 83 / new book pp. 35 – top of 53.

 

 3. Do questions on take-home Act II quiz  over p. 65 – top of p. 83 / new book p. 35 – top of 53! 

HINT!  Expect these to be graded!


 

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 ASSIGNMENT H9: ACT II “say on; come to hecuba”!

Due date ________________

 

1.       Read Act II , ii, pp. 83-90/new book pp. 53-60This is tough

 

2.       Soliloquy #3 Paraphrase  pp. 88-90/new book pp. 58-60, lines 559-     617.

                       

3.       Do the AP PRACTICE QUESTIONS #24-30 FOR Hamlet’s 3rd Soliloquy

Do not merely answer the questions.  Fill the margins of each question with justification.  Also, mark relevant evidence in the actual passages as well.  Be prepared to defend your personal answers in class!

 

4.       Complete the take-home quiz  covering pp. 78-90/new book pp. 48-60. 

Be sure to record page #s.

 

5.      Now, do  H-WA____ TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION AFTER ACT II

YOU HAVE TWO TASKS IN THIS JOURNAL! Task A (at least a full page) goes on the front; Task B (at least 1/2 page) goes on the back (or another sheet of paper).

 

 TASK A  Read carefully over the following topics after finishing Act II.  Choose one or more upon which to write at least a full page of discussion/analysis, etc.  Let your ideas run wild, but ground them in examples/proof from the text.  List page numbers to help remind you where you got the ideas.  We will use these questions as a springboard for small or large-group discussion. 

 

Be sure to write/summarize the question at the front end of your discussion so than anyone reading it can recognize to which question you’re responding right away.

 

HERE ARE THE TOPICS FOR TASK A:

a)      What are the positives Hamlet sees in the world?  What are the negatives?  If he were your best friend, what way of life would he recommend for you to live?  What makes you think so?  Give proof!

 

b)      In the soliloquies, it's said that Hamlet lays bare his true motives and his true weaknesses.  Trace Hamlet's development/stage in each soliloquy thus far.  Has he changed since the first one?  If so, how?  If not, what makes you think that?  Based on the soliloquies and his action thus far, predict what you think will happen next. Give proof.

 

c)      There are definitely both positives and negatives displayed in Hamlet's character thus far.  Hamlet says, "Though I am not splentive and rash, yet have I in me something dangerous."  Find concrete confirmation of both the positives and their less attractive negative counterparts.  If you were Hamlet's best friend, tell what you think is positive about him and what you think is negative.  Give proof.


 

 

d)      Comment on Hamlet's sanity.  If you were Hamlet's therapist, would you say he was sane or insane?  What would give us the tendancy to believe the Hamlet is seriously in danger of losing his sanity?  Give proof.

 

e)      Some say that Hamlet does not have the make-up of a man who can commit revenge successfully.  August Wilhelm said:  "He does himself only justice when he says there is no greater dissimilarity than between himself and Hercules."  Do you think Hamlet has it in him to commit the task (revenge, etc.--see the ghost's commands) the ghost put on him?  What will it take?  What can he do?  Give proof.

 

f)        Agree or disagree:  Hamlet has legitimate reasons for delays in his revenge.  What are they?  If not, why not?  Give proof.

 

g)      How does "there is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so" express in philosophical terms the CORE of Hamlet's problem?  List several problems/concerns he has and how each can be viewed as both positive and negative at the same time.  Give proof.

 

h)      The play explores the nature of kingship.  What make a good king?  Is Claudius a good king?  Is he truly the "rottenness in Denmark"?  Would Hamlet make a good king?  Give proof.

 

 

 

 TASK B  IF HAMLET WERE A STUDENT AT EPHS…

When you’re done with your minimum one-page response, you must also journal at least 1/2 a page on this question: 

 

If Hamlet were a student at Eden Prairie High School, what type of student would he be? 

What activities would he choose?  What would his friends be like?  What classes would he take?  Would he have a girlfriend?  Be elected student council president? 

Add whatever else might seem applicable! 

What would the “blurb” under his senior graduation picture say?

 


 

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 ASSIGNMENT H10-A: “TO BE OR NOT TO BE?

Due date ________________

 

1.      Read HAMLET Act III, scene i,  pp. 91-93/new book pp. 61-63.

 

2.      When you get to the "To be or not to be?" soliloquy, read it aloud!

 

3.       Soliloquy #4 Paraphrase   (pp. 93-94 / new book pp. 63 – 67, lines 57 – 88) on the sheets provided for you by the teacher

 

4.      Also, read some  examples of parodies  of this soliloquy (attached to quiz).

 

5.       Complete the take-home quiz—ONLY QUESTIONS_____-______  on this reading.

 

 

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 ASSIGNMENT H10-B:  THE “NUNNERY” SCENE

Due date ________________

 

 

1.       Read HAMLET Act III, scene i,  pp. 94-97/new book pp.64-67.

 

2.  Complete the take-home quiz  QUESTIONS ____-_____ on this reading.

 

 

 

 

 


 

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 ASSIGNMENT H11: ACT III “The play’s the thing…”

Due date ________________

 

1.       Read HAMLET Act III scenes ii-iii , pp. 98 – 113 / new book pp. 68 - 83.

 

2.      Complete the take-home quiz—QUESTIONS _______ -______  on this reading.

 

3.       H-WA____ Critical Review  of different actors' portrayals or directorial choices in HAMLET.

Using your viewing logs and ideas from watching any videos or live performances of Hamlet, write a one-page critical review of the actors' performances of either:

·        the "rogue and peasant slave" soliloquy at the end of Act II, or

·        the "to be or not to be" soliloquy at the beginning of Act III, or

·        any other combination of scenes comparing and contrasting what you've seen.

 

 NOTE  If you are interested, you may also choose to do the following:

 Cast your own Hamlet!  Who do you feel is best suited for the roles of the characters in this play - that is, other than the actual actors you have seen in the videos.  Feel free to choose actors alive or dead for the roles you think would best suit them.  Be sure to tell why you chose who you did for each role.


 

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 ASSIGNMENT H12-A: THE KING SPEAKS / HAMLET RESPONDS

Due date ________________

 

1.      Read HAMLET Act III, scene ii - iii,  pp. 114 –115/ new book pp. 84-85.

 

2.       Paraphrase Your Assigned Soliloquy  – either the King's (p. 114 / new book p. 84)  or  Hamlet's (p. 115/new book p. 85) soliloquy.  

(Your teacher will assign which study partner will do the King’s and which study partner will will do Hamlet's.  If you miss class the day the teacher assigns these, you MUST do the King's soliloquy.)

 

3.       Do the AP PRACTICE QUESTIONS #31-37 FOR KING’S SOLILOQUY

Do not merely answer the questions.  Fill the margins of each question with justification.  Also, mark relevant evidence in the actual passages as well.  Be prepared to defend your personal answers in class!

 

 

4.      Complete the take-home quiz #______-_______  on this reading.

 

 

 

***********************************************************************************************

 

 

 

 

ASSIGNMENT H12-B: THE “CLOSET” SCENE

Due date ________________

 

1.  Read HAMLET Act III, scene ii - iii,  pp. 116 – 123 / new book pp. 8693.

 

 2.  Do the AP PRACTICE QUESTIONS #38-45 AND #46-53 FOR 2 CLOSET SCENE PASSAGES

Do not merely answer the questions.  Fill the margins of each question with justification.  Also, mark relevant evidence in the actual passages as well.  Be prepared to defend your personal answers in class!

 

  3.  Complete the take-home quiz #____ - ______  on this reading.


 

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 ASSIGNMENT H13: CLAUDIUS’ MEETING IMPROV

Due date ________________

 

Do YOUR INDIVIDUAL PREP WORK FOR CLAUDIUS’ MEETING

 

a.      Carefully read the description of this class activity.

 

b.      Decide on the character you would like to be or help someone else play.

 

 

c.       Complete "Claudius' Meeting" packet in preparation for an in-class "improv" staging of this meeting. 

 

 NOTE:  You will turn in  BOTH  the worksheet and the chart -- both of which are included in the packet.

 ALSO NOTE  If you are playing Claudius, you will have a different preparation assignment.


 

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 ASSIGNMENT H14: ACT IV FORTINBRAS/LAERTES/OPHELIA CHECKS OUT

Due date ________________

 

1.       Read HAMLET Act IV, scene i - iv,  pp. 124 – 136 / new book pp. 94106.

 

2.       Complete the take-home quiz question _____- ____  on this reading.

 

3.      Do  Hamlet’s last soliloquy paraphrase.  pp. 131-132 / new book pp. 101-102, lines 32-66.

 

4.      Work on any  EXTRA CREDIT JOURNAL OPPORTUNITIES (+5 each).

 NOTE:  You may do up to 3 of these; f these may be done with a partner! 

 SOME OF THE CHOICES (you may submit your own ideas):

a.       song lyrics of a pre-existing song but now related to Hamlet or write your own Hamlet inspired song or revise an existing song so it relates to Hamlet

b.      soliloquy parodies

c.       Act IV letter from Hamlet to his mom

d.      poster inspired by a significant quotation

e.       rent/view another Shakespeare play and write a response to it as well as how it connects to Hamlet.

f.        Your own original idea (talk to your teacher for approval):______________________


 

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 ASSIGNMENT H15: ACT IV CLAUDIUS / LAERTES MAKE A DEAL

Due date ________________

 

1.       Read HAMLET Act IV, scene v - vii,  pp. 136 – 148 / new book pp. 106118.

 

2.       Complete the take-home quiz questions ____ - ____  on this reading.

 

3.       Do the AP PRACTICE QUESTIONS #54-60 and 61-68 FOR 2 ACT IV PASSAGES

Do not merely answer the questions.  Fill the margins of each question with justification.  Also, mark relevant evidence in the actual passages as well.  Be prepared to defend your personal answers in class!

 

4.       H-WA____ Journal Topic Options for Discussion after Act IV

Read carefully over the following topics after finishing Act IV.  Choose one or more upon which to write at least a full page of discussion/analysis, etc.  Let your ideas run wild, but ground them in examples/proof from the text.  List page numbers to help remind you where you got the ideas.  We will use these questions as a springboard for small or large-group discussion. 

Be sure to write/summarize the question at the front end of your discussion so than anyone reading it can recognize to which question you’re responding right away.

 

 HERE ARE THE TOPICS FOR THIS ACT IV JOURNAL ENTRY:

a.                   Agree or disagree with this statement:  Claudius has the "stuff"--the character and abilities-- of which truly effective leaders /kings are made.  He is a more formidable leader than Hamlet could be.

b.                  Agree or disagree with this statement:  Ophelia's outcome was, indeed, to be expected.  It is consistent with her temperament and character as revealed earlier in the play.

c.                   Hamlet again fails to follow through on his plan for revenge.  Is Hamlet seriously flawed or superlatively civilized?  If custom and honor demand he avenge his father, why does he continue to hesitate when "golden opportunity" presents itself?  Does he believe that all order in his universe would shatter should he kill his uncle?  Or is he, as he has stated in his soliloquies, a coward, unable to steel himself to the deed?  If so, why does he decide so early on in the play that he must avenge his father's death by murder?  Why has he not instead used his popularity with the people to enlist their aid and depose his uncle?  Depending on your view of Hamlet at this point, what resolution do you foresee in the final act?

d.                  Early in the play, Marcellus cried out prophetically, "Something is rotten in the state of Denmark," implying that the destruction of the people comes from within.  In this act, many of the characters are described as inwardly "sick" as if they have been afflicted with a disease.  Claudius tells us his "soul is full of discord and dismay," that Hamlet is a "hectic" (fever) in his blood that must be cured for him to be happy again.  Gertrude refuses at first to see Ophelia because, to her "sick soul," the deranged girl is a painful reminder of her sins.  Laertes refers to a "sickness" in his heart.

Discuss how each of these three characters have become morally corrupted from within themselves.


 

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ASSIGNMENT H16: “Alas poor Yorick…”  LET IT BE!

Due date ________________

 

1.       Read HAMLET Act V  pp. 149 – 162 / new book pp. 119132.

 

2.       Complete the take-home quiz questions ______ - _______  on this reading.

 

3.       Do the AP PRACTICE QUESTIONS #69-75 and 76-82FOR ACT V PASSAGES 1 and 2

Do not merely answer the questions.  Fill the margins of each question with justification.  Also, mark relevant evidence in the actual passages as well.  Be prepared to defend your personal answers in class!


 

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 ASSIGNMENT H17: ACT V “Good night sweet Prince …”

Due date ________________

 

1.       Read HAMLET Act V  pp. 162 – 174 / new book pp. 132144.

 

2.       Finish Act V quiz questions.  

 

3.       Do the last set of AP PRACTICE QUESTIONS #83-91FOR ACT V

Do not merely answer the questions.  Fill the margins of each question with justification.  Also, mark relevant evidence in the actual passages as well.  Be prepared to defend your personal answers in class!

 

4.       H-WA____: WORDS TO LIVE BY

You have CHOICE of one of these topics:

 

 TOPIC 1.  Hamlet’s Letter of Advice to His Children

Assume Hamlet is now an adult on his deathbed.  His two children have come to him to bid their last farewells. Before he dies, Hamlet would like to leave them with some advice on how to live their lives in a fulfilling, best chance at happiness way.  What would he tell them?

 

TOPIC 2.  Revisiting the “QUOTES TO CONSIDER”

Re-read the first side of your Hamlet WA___ "Quotes to Consider" about a quote in the boxes.  Now that you have read Hamlet, revisit the quote and relate it specifically to the play.  Consider the plot, characters, and themes to find connections.

 

 TOPIC 3. REACTION TO ARTICLES ABOUT HAMLET

 

React to one or two of the assigned articles given to you in class.

Feel free to use a letter format to actually respond to these authors personally!  (Perhaps we could mail/e-mail them to the authors!)

 

 

OLD BEOWULF WITH RAFFEL TRANSLATION!

 

So, you say you like monsters?  Get ready...             (rev. term 2 ‘06)

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 ASSIGNMENT B1 "BEOWULF, DID YOU EVER KNOW THAT YOU'RE MY HERO?"

Due date ________________

 

1.      Journal Entry WA#____ “WHAT’S IN A NAME?”

 a   Read through all the articles given you on names.  Choose a few you feel strongly about.  Think about this concept of names.

Names were a big deal during the Anglo-Saxon times and in Beowulf.  Is this also true still in our society today?    Where did you get your name?  What weight has your name been given through-out your life?  Has your name ever brought you privilege or the cause of a negative situation?  What name would you rather have?  Do you have a nickname?  How/why did that come about?  Will you change your name after marriage?  What do you think of the increasingly popular option of a woman (man?) retaining her (his) childhood family name?  What about double or hyphenated last names?  "What's in a name, anyway?"

 

 b   Taking into consideration the ideas reflected in the paragraph above, the articles you just read on names, and your own ideas on the topic of names, write at least a one-sided page response for your WA .  Make sure you identify the name of the article you are reacting to before your actual reaction to each specific article.

 

2.      Journal Entry WA#____: “HEROES” (a two-sider = 10 pts.)

You will use a packet of articles (as well as one article about a female "hero" and a male "hero") as a basis for this  HEROES JOURNAL ENTRY .   Furthermore, one of the most popular topics regarding Beowulf is  the concept of "heroism" and whether Beowulf, the character, measures up to the Anglo-Saxon definition, a modern definition, and, ultimately, your personal definition.  This packet of articles helps tremendously in reviewing the concepts out there in our world today regarding a "MODERN HERO."  So, again, read the articles carefully. 

 For this minimum of two-sided journal entry, comment on several of the following:

a.     the article entitled "Learning the Power and the Point of Communication" on the reverse side of the salmon cover sheet

b.     the article in the packet by Paul Levy entitled "What Makes a Hero?"

c.     the article in the packet from Psychology Today entitled "How to Be Great!" 

d.     at least ONE other article from this packet (or another cool article you find on your own about a "hero"--be sure to attach a copy of this article to your journal)

e.     two articles included in this packet about two individual heroes (a male  and  a female) 

 

Taking these articles into consideration and your own ideas about what a hero is, address all or any of the following:  Talk about your own as well as what you think our society's perceptions of a hero are.  In addition, reflect on what you think the early English people thought of when defining a hero.  Think about who your heroes were  (and why) as you were growing up and how those people might have faded from your memory.  What heroes do you have now (or would like to have)?  What heroes would you wish for your children to have?  What heroes do you think they will have (regardless of your input)?

 

 NOTE  You might even take Professor Chiodo's suggestion (as mentioned in Dale Dauten's article on the reverse side) and turn what you have written into a letter to actually send to your personal "hero" (or someone you admire most if the word "hero" sounds too weird/powerful/trendy.) 

What better gift to give that special person during your senior year?????? 


 

 NEW, IMPROVED Frankenstein (as of 1-5-08):   F1  |  F2  | F3  |  F4  |  F5  |  F6  |  F7  |  F8  |  F9  |  F10  | F11

 

NEW GRAY FRANKENSTEIN

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Name_________________________________ Hr. ____  Term ____ Date________________

Wallenberg (rev. term 5/5/08)

 

 NEW  FRANKENSTEIN ASSIGNMENTS

 

 Assignment F1: BACKGROUND INFORMATION to Frankenstein

Due date ________________

For your first Frankenstein assignment, you will be taking three sets of notes (25 points) on critical BACKGROUND INFORMATION .

 

1.       NOTES ON THE ROMANTICS

 

EVERYONE will do in-depth notes on the Romantic Period.

 

•Read pp. 565-576 in the black LBT text on "The Romantic Age 1798-1832) and take at least two sides of a page of notes.  (10 pts.)  These should look like NOTES!

Use color, highlight, boxes, bold letters, capitals, space, etc. (so that the notes are easily read by other group members when you compare notes tomorrow)

NOTE  Pay special attention to major events that characterize the Romantic Period, trends and styles, and look especially closely for something to put down in your notes about these critical names:

§         Mary Wollstonecroft and William Godwin,

§         William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge,

§         Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron (George Gordon), and John Keats, and

§         Mary Wollstonecroft Shelley.

 

2.       NOTES ON GROUP ASSIGNED TOPICS

Do additional reading and take at least two sides of a page of notes (worth 10 points) on your group’s assigned topic as listed below.  Once again, these should look like NOTES!  Use color, highlight, boxes, bold letters, capitals, space, etc. (so that the notes are easily read by other group members when you compare notes tomorrow).

 

 GROUP A: THE NEO-CLASSICAL PERIOD EXPERTS

•In the black LBT, read pp. 346-356 “The Seventeenth Century” (1625-1660) and pp. 433-444 "Restoration and the Eighteenth Century (1660-1798) and take at least ONE sides of a page of notes.  (5 pts.)

Complete the worksheet with boxes comparing the Neo-Classical Period and the Romantic Periods.  (5 pts.)

 


 

 GROUP B: MARY WOLLSTONECROFT

•Read the two articles on Mary Wollstonecroft and take at least two sides of a page of notes.  (10 pts.)   Be sure to key in on what it was about her life that struck you as most engaging, interesting, critical, etc.

 

 GROUPS C and D: MARY SHELLEY

•Read the articles on Mary Shelley and take at least two sides of a page of notes.  (10 pts.)   Be sure to key in on what it was about her life that struck you as most engaging, interesting, critical, etc.

 

 GROUP E: THE GOTHIC NOVEL EXPERTS

•Read the article entitled, "Gothic Horror," and take at least two sides of a page of notes.  (10 pts.)

 

 

 

 

3.       NOTES ON THE AUTHOR INTRODUCTION

 

EVERYONE will read and do at least ONE side of a page of in-depth notes on Mary Shelley's "Author's Introduction" (1831) AND Percy Shelley's "Preface" (1817) in the Frankenstein text.

§         green CSCC text:  pp. 3-25

§         orange Signet text:  vii-xiv

§         paperback Signet text:  xxi-xxvii

 

Focus on what it was that struck you as most engaging, interesting, critical, etc. 

For example, what made you wonder?  What would you like to ask Mary Shelley about her "Author's Introduction" if you were given the chance? 


 

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 Assignment F2: Rime of Ancient Mariner and Walton’s Narrative

Due date ________________

HOMEWORK ON COLERIDGE BACKGROUND and RIME (2 sides of a page total = 20 points):

  1. Read about Coleridge (p. 594 LBT).  Jot down some notes on a piece of paper where you will also put your study questions for the Rime of the Ancient Mariner.  (3 points)

 

  1. Read about the Rime of the Ancient Mariner's sound devices (p. 595 LBT)  Jot down some notes on a piece of paper where you will also put your study questions for the Rime of the Ancient Mariner. (3 points)

 

  1. Now, read Coleridge's entire Rime of the Ancient Mariner in LBT (pp. 596-618).

 

§         Answer SQ's 1-9, 11-12 (pp. 618-619) on the sheet of paper on which you placed your Coleridge and sound device notes.  (11 points)

 

  1.  TAKE A BREAK! (I mean it!  You'll need it!)

 

  1. Read  Walton’s Narrative .

·        green CSCC text:  pp. 25-38

·        orange Signet text:  15-29

·        Signet paperback text:  1-15

 

As you read, jot down information about the characters on your character chart and the page number where each first appears.

 

6.  Read the Prometheus story hand-out.  Read the poem "Prometheus" by Lord Byron on the Supplemental Poetry with Frankenstein hand-out.  Jot down about 1/2 a page of  ideas/questions about each of these right under your Rime of the Ancient Mariner study questions.  Label these "Thoughts on Prometheus."   (3 points)

 

7. Write 3 "FIG" questions for this Frankenstein reading in the Frankenstein FIG Question Packet. Do 1 of each level--pink = level 1 factual, blue = level 2 interpretive, green = level 3 global.   Put your personal answers to each of the three questions on the back of each question. Click HERE to get a reminder as to what FIG questions are.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FIG Questions: Levels of Questions

We want students to improve their thinking skills.  This requires that teachers refrain from doing the thinking for them.  It is more important to teach the students to ASK questions than it is for the students to answer questions we ask them.

 

Show students the different types or levels of questions they should ask about a piece of literature.

 

 

F

 

 Level One  Questions: These questions can be answered definitely with facts found in the text or by information readily available in outside sources.

Example: Name the feuding families in Romeo and Juliet.
Example: Where in Italy is Verona located?
Example: What is an apothecary?

Notice that level one question have one correct answer and lend themselves to matching, multiple choice, or fill-in-the-blank tests.  Although they require the student to read the work, they require little thought or understanding.

 

 

 F  = fact question (pink)

 

 

 

 

I

 

 Level Two  Questions: The answers to these questions may be implied rather than stated directly in the reading.  This requires students to make inferences based on specific information they can cite to back up their conclusions.

Example: What is Romeo’s concept of love at the start of the play?
Example: Is Friar Lawrence or the Nurse more to blame for the tragedy?
Example: How do you explain Tybalt’s anger toward Romeo?

Level two questions call for longer answers and more thinking.  They not only require students to do the reading but also force them to consider what they have read.

 

 

 I   = interpretive question (blue)

 

 

 

 

G

 

 Level Three  Questions: These questions are more abstract – they go outside the text and present issues for discussion that bring in the students’ frame of reference.

Example: Are girls Juliet’s age ready to be married?
Example: Is ‘love at first sight’ really love?
Example: Should parents arrange marriages for their children?

Notice that while level three questions will probably promote the most discussion, they may not necessarily require that the students have carefully read the text.

 

 

 G  =global question
(goldenrod)

 

 

If we want students in advanced classes to think about what they have read, we should ask level two and three questions.  Even better, we should get the students themselves to think up their own level two and three questions.


 

 

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 Assignment F3: more Coleridge and Chapters 1 – 5

Due date ________________

  1.  Read about the writing of "Kubla Khan" in LBT p. 620-623.  Jot down some notes. (5 points)
  2.  Read Coleridge's poem, "Kubla Khan" (LBT pp. 621-623)

·         After the previous notes, answer questions 1 – 9, page 623.

 

  1. Read Charles Lamb's "The Old Familiar Faces," a poem alluded to (see p. 30 Signet) in this section of Frankenstein.

Under the “Kubla Khan” study questions, write the title of the poem, "The Old Familiar Faces."   Then, and jot down your understanding of what it's about and how it relates to where we are now in the novel Frankenstein. (3 points)

 

  1. Read  chapters 1 – 5 of VICTOR’S NARRATIVE

·        green CSCC text:  pp. 38-66

·        orange Signet text:  pp. 31-61

·        Signet paperback: p. 17-47

 

Under your comments on “The Old Familiar Faces,” explain the allusion to the Rime of the Ancient Mariner on p. 59 green/p. 58 orange/p. 44 Signet paperback.  (3 points)  This makes the background work homework worth 20 points.

 

 

5. Write 3 "FIG" questions for this Frankenstein reading in the Frankenstein FIG Question Packet. Do 1 of each level--pink = level 1 factual, blue = level 2 interpretive, goldenrod = level 3 global.      Put your personal answers to each of the three questions on the back of each question. Click HERE to get a reminder as to what FIG questions are.


 

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 Assignment F4: Chapters 6 – 10 & Lord Byron & Percy Bysshe Shelley

Due date ________________

  1. Read  chapters 6 – 10 of VICTOR’S NARRATIVE

·        green CSCC text:  pp. 62-92

·        orange Signet text:  pp. 62-97

·        Signet paperback:  pp. 48-83

 

As you read, jot down information about the characters on your character chart and the page number where each first appears.

 

  1. Write 3 "FIG" questions for this Frankenstein reading in the Frankenstein FIG Question Packet. Do 1 of each level--pink = level 1 factual, blue = level 2 interpretive, goldenrod = level 3 global.   Put your personal answers to each of the three questions on the back of each question. Click HERE to get a reminder as to what FIG questions are.

 

  1.  GROUP ASSIGNED TOPICS (this HW totals 10 points)

 

 GROUP A: THE BYRON EXPERTS

·        Read about Lord Byron, pp. 624-625 LBT.  Jot down some notes.

·        Read Lord Byron's poem, "She Walks in Beauty" (p. 626 LBT) and answer SQ's 1-4 p. 626.

 

·        Re-read the articles given to you on Prometheus and actively read Byron's poem "Prometheus."

 

·        Under the four "She Walks in Beauty" SQ's, jot down how Byron's poem "Prometheus" and as well as "She Walks in Beauty" relate to Frankenstein (Write approx. 1/2 page).

 

 GROUP B: THE DON JUAN EXPERTS

·        Read about  mock epic poems, p. 632. Jot down some notes.

·         Then read from "Don Juan," pp. 633-635 and answer SQ's 1-5, p. 635.

 

·        Under the SQ's, write a response to this poem (at least 1/2 page).  Also, include how this poem may relate to Frankenstein.


 

 GROUP C: THE PERCY SHELLEY EXPERTS

·        Read about Percy Bysshe Shelley and odes, pp. 636-637, LBT.  Jot down a few notes.

·        Read Shelley's poem, "Ozymandias" (p. 638 LBT) and answer SQ's 1-4 p. 638.

 

·        Then, look up the word "mutability."  Write down this word and its definition under your SQ's on "Ozymandias." 

 

·        Read both Shelley's and Wordworth's poems, both called "Mutability."  Compare and contrast the two poems (at least 1/2 a page) under your definition of "mutability."

 

·        Reread the pages in Frankenstein where Shelley's "Mutability" appears:

•green CSCC text:  p. 89

•orange Signet text:  pp. 93-94

•Signet paperback:  pp. 79-80

 

·        On the back of your page of SQ's and ideas about the two poems called "Mutability," discuss how both "Ozymandias" and both versions of "Mutability" may relate to Frankenstein.

 

 

 

 GROUP D: THE PERCY SHELLEY “ODE”EXPERTS

·        Read about Percy Bysshe Shelley and "odes," pp. 636-637, LBT.  Jot down some notes

·        Read Shelley's poem, "Ode to the West Wind" (pp. 640-643 LBT)

·        Answer SQ's 1-9 p. 643.

·        Under the SQ's, write a response to this poem (at least 1/2 page).

·        Finally, jot down how this poem may relate to Frankenstein.

 

 

 

 GROUP E: THE POT LUCK GROUP

·        •THIS IS YOUR LUCKY DAY!  You are to choose another group's assignment.

 

·        Everyone in the group can do the same assignment or choose individually from letters A-D.  Follow directions as outlined above.


 

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Assignment F5: Chapters 11 – 16

Due date ________________

  1. Read  chapters 11 – 16 of THE CREATURE’S NARRATIVE

·        green CSCC text:  pp. 92-124

·        orange Signet text:  pp. 93-137

·        Signet paperback text: pp. 84-123

 

  1. Write 3 "FIG" questions for this Frankenstein reading in the Frankenstein FIG Question Packet. Do 1 of each level--pink = level 1 factual, blue = level 2 interpretive, goldenrod = level 3 global.   Put your personal answers to each of the three questions on the back of each question. Click HERE to get a reminder as to what FIG questions are

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assignment F6: LOGIC and PERSUASIVE WRITING FOR POSITION PAPER

Due date ________________

 

You are to now begin working on the position paper in earnest.  Hopefully, you have done some preliminary research on your topic and begun to find information brought up in Frankenstein which can be used in your paper.

 

The purpose of this next part of this assignment is to learn (or review) some writing strategies which are necessary components of position papers:  the use of logic to support an argument  and  how to write persuasively.

 

LOGIC INFO--(WORTH A TOTAL OF 25 points) Use your gray EWS Grammar book chapter 8.  

  1. Read chapter 8, "Logic and Writing," (pp. 236-252) in the gray 12th grade edition of the book
  2. English Writing Skills.  As you read, take at least two sides of a page of notes (worth 10 pts.) and do the exercises listed below.

Do the following exercises:

        Writing Practice #1 (pp. 239-240)--do odds or evens (your choice)   (worth 5 pts.)

        Writing Practice #2 (p. 241)--choose only ONE of the three situations given (worth 7 pts.)

        Writing Practice #3 (p. 245)--choose any THREE of those statements given (worth 3 pts.)

NOTE  You will be turning the Writing Practices in with your notes.

 

 

PERSUASIVE WRITING (WORTH A TOTAL OF 30 points)

 

The purpose of this next part of this assignment is to learn (or review) some writing strategies for writing persuasively.

 

1.  Read chapter 9, "Persuasive Writing," (pp. 258-275) in the gray 12th grade edition of the book English Writing Skills.  As you read, take at least two sides of a page of notes (worth 10 pts.).

2.Do the following exercises:

·        Do Writing Practice #1 (p. 262)--you need to find only ONE ad to attach to this Writing Practice #1 (a product ad  or  a public relations ad) (worth 5 pts.), and

·        Writing Practice #2 (p. 264) (worth 4 pts.) , and

·        Writing Practice #3 (p. 266) (worth 4 pts.) , and

·        Writing Practice #4 (p. 269)--Choose either ONLY ONE of the topics given in the gray book  or  choose a Frankenstein position paper topic.   (worth 1 pt.)

You will be turning in these writing practices with your notes.

  1. After reading the model persuasive essay on pp. 273-274, answer the 6 "Think and Discuss" questions on p. 275.(worth 6 pts.)

Attach the following grading slip to all your LOGIC and PERSUASIVE WRITING HOMEWORK:

Name ______________________ Hr.___ Due ______

Logic and Persuasion Homework

  F6    Logic

            Chapter  8 notes (2 sides—236-252)          /10 pts.

            p. 239  WP #1 (do 5-odds or evens)             /  5

                                                     p. 241

            p. 241  WP #2 (7 Q’s-choose 1 topic­)          /  7

                                                     p. 240

            p. 245  WP #3 -  3 statements                     /  3

                                                                              /25  

_____________________________________________

  F7     Persuasion

            Chapter 9 notes (2 sides—258-275)                    /10 pts.

            p. 262  WP #1  - w/ad + 4 Q’s                   /  5     

 

            p. 264  WP #2 - loaded words                   /  4                                                                                                 

            p. 266 WP #3 – propaganda                    /  4                             

            p. 269 WP #4 – only 1 proposition             /  1     

           

            p. 275  6 Think & Discuss Questions            /  6

                        (after reading pp. 273-4  Model

                        Persuasive Essay)        

                                                                            /30

 

 

Now would be a good time to go reread the packet outlining the position paper.  NOTE:   You will be turning in

·        your  PROPOSITION  (see pp. 267-269)

·        a  list of arguments  for your position

·        a  list of opposing arguments  you'd predict the other side may come up with. 

 

This is due on __________________ (approximately a week before the final paper is due).  Ask your teacher for the exact due date for this.

 


 

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Assignment F7: READINGS on Chapters 11 – 16

Due date ________________

  1. Do the reading and questions for the selections below to which your group is assigned.  (15 HW points)

 GROUP A:  MILTON AND SONNETS

·        Read about John Milton on p. 404.  Jot down some notes.

·        Read two of Milton's sonnets.

                                 "When I Consider How My Light is Spent" (p. 406 LBT)

- Answer your choice of  six  of the 7 study questions listed on p. 406.

            AND

“On His Having Arrived at the Age of Twenty Three" (p. 408 LBT)

- Answer your choice of  six  of the 7 study questions listed on p. 406.

 

 GROUPS B and C:  MILTON AND PARADISE LOST

·        Read about John Milton on p. 404.  Jot down some notes.

·        Read from Milton's poem, "Paradise Lost" (pp. 411-418 LBT) and answer SQ's 1-12 p. 419.

 

 GROUPS D and E:  FAUST

·        Read about Goethe's Faust pp. 676-677, LBT

- Jot down some notes. 

 

·        Then, read about Christopher Marlowe and about the Faust legend, pp. 208-209 LBT.  Jot down some notes.

 

·        Then read from "The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus" pp. 210-212, LBT.

 

·        Do SQ's 1-8 on p. 213.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Assignment F8: MORE ARTICLES & A JOURNAL with Chapters 11 – 16

Due date ________________

  1. Read Eileen A. Simmons' article, "Frankenstein for the Twenty-First Century:  An Exploration of Contemporary Issues"  AND  jot down a page of notes.  Be sure to record any ideas this article gives you for the position paper or which seem otherwise valuable.

 

  1. Read Paul A. Cantor and Michael Valdez Moses' article, "Teaching Frankenstein from the Creature's Perspective"  AND  jot down a page of notes.

 

3.      JOURNAL:  M.I.B. (Most Important Books)

In chapters 11-16, the creature identifies 4 books that have had a profound influence on him.  Interview 4 people (representing 4 different decades of life and who are preferably from different "walks" of life).  Ask them what their personal "top four" books would be.  By "top books," I mean books which have profoundly affected them  or  books that have such powerful messages that they are books others must read, too,  or  are books so vital to a culture that if all other books suddenly disappeared, these would be the last four books chosen to remain in existence.

 

Be sure to write up the criteria/reasons each person gives for each book and a little about what the book is all about.

 

After writing up the results of what you found others chose, identify your own top 4, too.  Explain why you chose these 4.


 

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Assignment F9: Chapters 17 – 21 and Wordsworth

Due date ________________

  1. Read  chapters 17 – 21 of VICTOR’S NARRATIVE

·        green CSCC text:  pp. 124-155

·        orange Signet text:  pp. 138-175

·        Signet paperback:  pp. 124-162

 

  1. Write 3 "FIG" questions for this Frankenstein reading in the Frankenstein FIG Question Packet.

          Do 1 of each level--pink = level 1 factual, blue = level 2 interpretive, goldenrod = level 3 global.  

           Put your personal answers to each of the three questions on the back of each question. Click

           HERE to get a reminder as to what FIG questions are.

 

WORDSWORTH, ETC. HW (15 HW points):

  1. Read about Wordsworth on pp. 578-579 LBT.  Jot down some notes. (3 points)
  2. Read Wordsworth's poem, "Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey (p. 580-585 LBT) and answer SQ's 1-6 p. 585   (6 points)
  1. Read Wordsworth's poem, "The World is Too Much With Us" (p. 589 LBT) and answer SQ's 1-4 p. 589.  (4 points)
  1. Read Anthony Backes' article, "Revisiting Frankenstein:  A Study in Reading and Education."

As you read, jot down information which struck you as interesting, important, etc., or which might be valuable for the POSITION PAPER.   (2 points)

 

 

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Assignment F10: Chapters 22 – 24 (stop before Letter 4) and Keats

Due date ________________

  1. Read chapters 22 to almost all of 24 of VICTOR’S NARRATIVE

 NOTE PAGE NUMBERS CAREFULLY!  DO NOT FINISH THE BOOK.

·        green CSCC text:  pp. 155-174

·        orange Signet text:  pp. 177-199

·        Signet paperback:  pp. 163-186

 

  1. Write 3 "FIG" questions for this Frankenstein reading in the Frankenstein FIG Question

         Packet. Do 1 of each level--pink = level 1 factual, blue = level 2 interpretive, goldenrod = level 3 global.    Put your personal answers to each of the three questions on the back of each question.

         Click HERE to get a reminder as to what FIG questions are

 

 

 

  1. Do Group Work on KEATS (10 HW points) as assigned below:

 GROUP A

Read about John Keats, pp. 650-651, LBT.  Jot down some notes.

Read Keats' sonnet, "When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be" (p. 655 LBT).

Do SQ's 1-5, p. 655.

 

 GROUPS B & C

Read about John Keats, pp. 650-651, LBT.  Jot down some notes.

Read Keats' poem, "Ode on a Grecian Urn," (pp. 662-664 LBT).

Answer SQ's 1-7 p. 664.

 

 GROUP D

Read about John Keats, pp. 650-651, LBT, and read Keats' poem, "Endymion" (hand-out). 

Write down a 1/2 page response to this poem.  Include any questions you have about this poem, any   

         other poems by Keats or about Keats' life.

 

 GROUP E

Read about John Keats, pp. 650-651, LBT.  Jot down some notes.

      Read Keats' poem, "Ode to a Nightingale” (pp. 657-660 LBT)

      Answer SQ's 1-9 p. 6661 LBT.

 

 


 

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Assignment F11: finish Frankenstein and some FINAL THOUGHTS

Due date ________________

  1. Read  the end of letter 4 of WALTON’S NARRATIVE

·        green CSCC text:  pp. 174-185

·        orange Signet text:  pp. 199-211

·        Signet paperback:  pp. 186-198

 

  1. Write 3 "FIG" questions for this Frankenstein reading in the Frankenstein FIG Question Packet. 

             Do 1 of each level--pink = level 1 factual, blue = level 2 interpretive, goldenrod = level 3 global.  

             Put your personal answers to each of the three questions on the back of each question. Click

              HERE to get a reminder as to what FIG questions are.

 

  1. Do the group work as outlined below:

 GROUP A:  MILLER

Read Miller's "Foreward:  The Future of Frankenstein" (pp. v-xviii in Signet paperback).  Take at least one side of a page of notes.

 

 GROUP B:  BLOOM

Read Bloom's "Afterward:  The Future of Frankenstein" (pp. 199-210 in Signet paperback  or  pp. 212 in orange Signet text).  Take at least one side of a page of notes.

 

 GROUP C: DANTE

Read Dante's Inferno, canto 26.  Then go back to the novel and reread the speech Frankenstein gives Walton's men (p.  178 green / pp. 203-204 orange / pp. 190-191 Signet paperback).  What motivates Victor's desire for knowledge compared to what motivates Ulysses?  In at least a page, compare and contrast Ulysses' speech with Victor Frankenstein's speech.  How does this relate to Frankenstein?

 

 GROUP D:  LIT. THEORY

Ask your teacher for one of the literary theory articles (choices are these: reader response, Marxist, psychoanalytic, and feminist) about FrankensteinRespond to the article in at least a page.

 

 GROUP E: POTLUCK ARTICLES

Read one of these selections by Anne Mellor:  "Frankenstein and the Sublime"  or  chapter 4 "Promethean Politics"  or  her chapter 7 "Problems of Perception" (from her book Mary Shelley: Her Life, Her Fiction, and Her Monsters)  or  Kenneth Branagh’s article “Frankenstein Regained or  another article your teacher might have dug up for you!  Respond to your selection in at least a page.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

RAFFEL BEOWULF  OLD

 ASSIGNMENT B2:  HELLO BEOWULF  (Raffel trans.) part 1 pp 23 – 62.

Due date ________________

 

1.        Read the HELPFUL HINTS / SIGNIFICANT QUOTATIONS SHEETS FOR BEOWULF.

This is very important to help you get centered and focused on what's to come when reading Beowulf

 

2.       Read Beowulf part 1 CAREFULLY!  (pp. 23-62 in the Burton Raffel translation)

 

As you read, I strongly suggest you keep an  ongoing list of characters  as well as  plot development.  The names are numerous and confusing at first.

 BIG HINT: there is a list of the names in your Raffel translation, pp. 149-159 and a genealogical chart on p. 160.  Use these resources!

 

Also, keep the  “Significant Quotations  sheet beside you to refer to as you read.  Be sure to note these important quotations and their significance as you read.  There is a place for you to record at least 2 other significant quotations not listed on the sheet.

 

 

 

3.       Do the assigned WA____ Beowulf part 1.

NOTE: Each group will have a different assignment for this Beowulf part 1 WA.

 

 HERE ARE THE ASSIGNMENTS SPECIFIC TO YOUR ASSIGNED GROUP:

 

 

 BEOWULF GROUP – THE QUOTE EXPERTS

 

 Journal Entry WA#____ Beowulf part 1: Quotes 1 – 15

 

Your group will be assigned quotations  #1 – 15  from part 1.  Divide up the quotes however you would like so that each

person is assigned an equal number of quotes (at least 3 quotes each).

 

Write each quotation in its entirety on your journal entry (along with its page number) and underneath each one, comment on each of the following FOR EACH QUOTE:

 

a.        the quote's context

b.       its possible meaning and relevance to part 1

c.        possible larger meaning for us today or you personally


 

GRENDEL GROUP – MORE QUOTE EXPERTS and the LAYS