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NOTE!  If you have trouble with the above links, always go back to the link below that says "Calendar" or to the AP English Home Page and then to the word "CALENDAR."  Make sure the link has an "a" after the week number.  For example, do not go to a link that merely says "week 8."  The link must be RED and say week 8a to work.

back to CALENDAR | back to AP English Home Page

 

WEEK 6a: March 8-12, 2010

Finish Literary Theories (MONDAY)

    

  • Click HERE to see our latest 2010 AP LIT. CLASS PICTURES!

   

POETRY & Hamlet Act 1 (Wallies) 

and

Frankenstein  (Oles)

vs. Lit. Analysis paper DUE!

Due date on Monday, March 8th. 

Click HERE for the Lit. Analysis paper packet.

Click HERE for the grading sheet.

FYI:  ORDER TO TURN IN THE LIT. ANALYSIS PAPER:

  • grading sheet filled out (student parts only! Do not grade yourself!)

  • outline

  • paper

  • works cited

  • photocopy of the title page and back side of title page of each novel

  • highlighted copies of each doc. check--one per novel--in different colors

  • SECURITY copy--turn in (but not in folder with your paper) or e-mailed to Wally by midnight the day the paper is due!

  • ORDER TO TURN IN LIT ANALYSIS PAPER:         

    1. grading sheet (student parts MUST be filled out completely or you will lose points)   CLICK HERE FOR JUST THE YELLOW GRADING SHEET.

    2. outline (Yes!  It's required!--see the Survival Packet on how to do a properly formatted outline or click HERE)

    3. paper  (no need for sources highlighted)

    4. works cited (no need for sources highlighted)

    5. your copy of the summer reading book and any other sources used other than the 2 works you are comparing

    WARNING!  If you are doing a paper using a play (Hamlet) or poetry (Beowulf or one of the poems we studied, you MUST familiarize yourself with the special msf rules required for the works cited as well as for the parenthetical documentation rules and for the actual citing/quoting from plays and poetry.  BE SURE TO CAREFULLY FOLLOW the yellow works cited packet (click

    http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/media/works_cited2005.pdf

    to view) AND the green parenthetical documentation packet  (click

    http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/media/parenthetical.pdf

     to view).  ALSO, please bring your own copy of the summer reading novel to turn in with the paper!

     

the GLOBE theatre in LONDON!

 

Click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  

Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals.

Click HERE to go automatically to the yellow HW packet!

Click HERE for the Literary Time Periods Time line/Works Most Frequently Appearing on the AP Open-ended Essay.

NEW!  UPDATED! For some fun youtube Shakespeare, especially HAMLET, video links, click HERE.

Click HERE for a copy of the ivory HAMLET PACKET.

Click HERE to get a pdf. copy of the Hamlet AP Question Packet.

Click HERE to get a pdf. copy of the Hamlet Soliloquy Packet.

FOR A COPY OF OUR 2009 AP LIT POETRY TERMS PACKET, CLICK HERE!  YOU MAY WANT TO PRINT THIS!

LITERARY THEORY PAPER!

To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

SOME LIT THEORY PAPER REMINDERS (rev. 11.11.10):

1.  NOTE ABOUT THE SOURCES WALLY PROVIDED: the Bressler, Appleman, and Dobie TITLED articles are from books on literary theory.  The TITLED articles by Smith and Murfin appear in the back of either Frankenstein by Mary Shelley or Hamlet by William Shakespeare.  Follow the format in the Survival Manual pp. WC 17-18 for "When you use only a titled chapter or titled article in a book or pamphlet." 

Mary Shelley's name and William Shakespeare's name will appear on your works-cited page but NOT in any parenthetical references.  By the way, her name is spelled SHELLEY.

2.  Stories in anthologies are in quotation marks.   ex. "Cinderella"    Stories that are published as books are italicized.   ex.  Cinderella

3.  For a copy of how the paper should be organized, click HERE.

4.  If you do the paper with a partner, turn in one copy of the paper, with both names listed in the heading.  For the pagination, type both last names with an "and" in between them.  Turn in one grading sheet, but make sure both of you have put your comments in the comment box.  The paper should be slipped into both folders.

5.  Here's how you write the following:  PhD or  master's degree or MA.

6.  Be consistent with capitalization.  Either use "Reader Response" or "reader response."  Pay attention to how your sources capitalize the theories.  Pick a style and be consistent.

7.  ABOUT HIGHLIGHTING ON PAPER AND SOURCES!  Do not highlight anything in the actual paper.  Photocopy the pages from the sources you have used.  Only highlight what you used in the sources you have borrowed from the bins AND those YOU have located on your own so that I may easily locate the place on the source for the doc. checks.  You do not have to highlight anything from the folk/fairy tales.  If the folk/fair tales are not paginated, please do so in pencil on the pages OR using post-its.

8.  Make sure you punctuate dialogue and any stage directions correctly.  Make sure you use the Survival Manual pages GRS 11-13 to help you do this.

9.  Be sure you document the storyline frequently in the section where you are retelling the story.  Unless you have a direct quote, it is best to do it episodically.

10.  Read the GRADING SHEET carefully,  so you don't miss anything required.  Be sure to establish credibility--both for your narrator as well as the REAL sources you use.

11.  E-mail or voice mail Wally (952 975-4303) if you have any questions.

12. The paper must be turned in by 3:00 on the due date or it's late (-10% per day late)!

13.  Including THOUGHTS can be tricky. The thoughts are indicated in BLUE.

Example writing the paper in 1st person:

I walk into the classroom really excited about the hour I am about to spend with the students in Ms. Anderson's Literary Theory 101 class.  I hope they will enjoy hearing about Thumbelina through feminist perspective and maybe will want to take my own online course as a result. 

I clear my throat and say, "Good morning, class." I wonder if anyone is listening.  I yell, "Hello!  My name is Sara Madison."  They are still talking!  Is there no discipline in the college classrooms today?  I'll try again.  "Quiet!" I screamed. Finally, I get their attention.

Example writing the paper in 3rd person:

The professor thought, "I wonder if he is actually going to ask that question."   
 
Then Professor Madison asked, "How many of you have read the story?"  She speculated that no one had.  Then she added, "Let me phrase it another way, then." She wondered if the hour would ever end and whether teaching was really her calling after all.

14. NOTE:  Be careful with tense!  Are you going to write the paper as the hour enfolds?  If so, you will be writing primarily in the present tense when it comes to the classroom events.  You can also choose to write the paper as if the event has already transpired; you would be reflecting back on how the events unfolded.  In that case, you would write primarily in the past tense.

15.  Pay special attention to stories that are "compiled by" or "retold by" or "adapted by."  They require special treatment for works cited and parenthetical documentation. See page WC 12 for how to do a translator, editor, compiler, or adapter.  

Click  HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)  Also, check out the section WITH EDITOR or TRANSLATOR or COMPILER   in the PDQ section of the Survival Manual.  Click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

 

Buybacks 

Notes: 1.  Record your results on the yellow and pink sheets in your folder.   By the way, Mr. Olson doesn't like to use the boxes at the end of the grading sheet.  He prefers that you read his comments in the margins to find the positives and suggestions.  You must summarize these in the pink boxes and write a goal for the next paper.  Then, record your number of errors in Lit. Analysis Paper column on the yellow technical sheet.) 2.   Be sure to follow directions! There will be a lot less "mercy" for not doing correcting the error correctly this time.   3.  YOU ARE REQUIRED TO WRITE OUT THE WHOLE SENTENCE THAT HAS THE ERROR(S).  DO NOT USE ELLIPSES!  4.  Make sure you do not make ANY NEW ERRORS.  If two or more errors occur in the same sentence, follow the specific directions on how to correct them all together.  5.   TURN BUYBACKS IN ON TIME!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  5.  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

 If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE. (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample (NOT PERFECT) of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

NOTE!  You may organize your buybacks by type of error or chronologically as they appear in your paper

MEMORIZE A SONNET!

77 LOVE SONNETS BY GARRISON KEILLOR

From Garrison Keillor:

"When I was 16, Helen Fleischman assigned me to memorize Shakespeare’s Sonnet No. 29, "When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state" for English class, and fifty years later, that poem is still in my head. Algebra got washed away, and geometry and most of biology, but those lines about the redemptive power of love in the face of shame are still here behind my eyeballs, more permanent than my own teeth. The sonnet is a durable good. These 77 of mine include sonnets of praise, some erotic, some lamentations, some street sonnets and a 12-sonnet cycle of months. If anything here offends, I beg your pardon, I come in peace, I depart in gratitude."

http://www.elabs7.com/ct.html?rtr=on&s=fj6,ggr6,dv,m9yp,85wm,iih1,lp0o

GK reads from 77 Love Sonnets in San Francisco on June 6:

http://www.elabs7.com/ct.html?rtr=on&s=fj6,ggr6,dv,8l1l,aw78,iih1,lp0o

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DATE In-Class plan Homework (due next day almost always):

MONDAY, day 25

vs.

Lit. Analysis paper DUE!

FOR FUN, Take a look that this Pride & Prejudice Austen Facebook

http://www.much-ado.net/austenbook/

 

Click HERE for the Lit. Analysis paper packet.

Click HERE for the grading sheet.

FYI:  ORDER TO TURN IN THE LIT. ANALYSIS PAPER:

  • grading sheet filled out (student parts only! Do not grade yourself!)

  • outline

  • paper

  • works cited

  • photocopy of the title page and back side of title page of each novel

  • highlighted copies of each doc. check--one per novel--in different colors

  • SECURITY copy--turn in (but not in folder with your paper)or e-mailed to Wally by midnight the day the paper is due!

  •  

  FINISH  

LITERARY THEORY BACKGROUND

an interesting link to feminist theory websites: 

http://vos.ucsb.edu/browse.asp?id=2828

Today's Quotes of the Day:

The radical novelty of modern science lies precisely in the rejection of the belief ... that the forces which move the stars and atoms are contingent upon the preferences of the human heart. -Walter Lippman, journalist (1889-1974)

"There is no coming to consciousness without pain. -Carl Jung, psychiatrist (1875-1961)

Today's Allusion:

Freudian Slip

"Freudian slippers"

 

Today's Words of the Day:

Elysian

empirical

Wally gets her prince!!

BOWERY POETRY CLUB

NOVEMBER 10th, 2005

 

Wally, Billy Collins, and Wally's friend Gail in NYC Nov. 12, 2005 right after his performance at the Bowery Poetry Club with Taylor Mali--"Page Meets Stage"

my friends John Wirth (writer/producer of Ghost Whisperer, Nash Bridges, Remington Steele) and Gail Matthius on Saturday Night Live in the early 1980's with their friend Billy Collins

Wally with Taylor Mali at the Bowery Poetry Club in NYC Nov. 12, 2005 For more info. on this club, go here: http://www.bowerypoetry.com/

Billy Collins and Taylor Mali

TAYLOR MALI

"What Teachers Make" on DPJ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAVK2Agtr10&feature=related

"Conviction" on DPJ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCNIBV87wV4&feature=related

 parody of Taylor's "Conviction"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xp7Nh_Z99yY&feature=related

There is a podcast link on this page that you can use to actually hear excerpts from the night of "Page Meets Stage" with Billy Collins and Taylor Mali reading their poetry! It's podcast #1.  Check it out! (maybe you can hear Wally's annoying laugh, too!)

 

 

 

 

  1. Group check-in:
  • weekend?

  • Share your lit analysis paper topics!

  • CHILDREN'S BOOKS! share your all-time favorite children's books and/or fairy tales

  1. Watch Taylor Mali do "Proofreading" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OonDPGwAyfQ
  2. ALLUSION OF THE DAY--Freudian Slip--Read the Little Freud piece, too, if time.

     

  3. Finish posters adding "Singing" vs. "Shooting" stories--did you prefer one over the other? Universal Questions?  FIG Q's? Responses to Active reading vs. not active reading.  Jot down.   

  4. SHARE POSTERS OF THEORIES:  formalism, reader-response (read 1st page of 2 papers), psychoanalytic (first page of "Singing Lesson," "Breakdown of Family" from Chicken Soup for the Soul, read 1st page of 2 papers, feminism (read 1st page of 2 papers), new historicism, deconstruction (read 1st page of Adam Neary's paper), marxism
  5. IF TIME, Discuss Lit. Theory paper--block it out on transparency
  6. If time, Rolf does Marxist "Hansel & Gretel"--demo of lit theory paper using overhead
  7. OTHER IDEAS:  "Red Riding Hood"  and the Little Freud piece to kick off unit,    "Serendipity and Lit Theory" -- Rachel Kaufman and Julia Callandar's story about Deborah Appleman, read Ada Alden's column about "Slovenly Peter "then show ANTZ film clip..  

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. OJ 8 Intro to Lit Theory (4 topics over 3 sides) 20 pts.
  2. PR #1 response

 

 

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. ADD A BIT MORE TO OJ 8:  Read "Unlearning the Myths" and jot down points of interest/reaction at the end of your OJ 8.  If you need a copy of this article (included in the purple Lit. Theory packet), click HERE. 

    FOR FUN, Take a look that this Pride & Prejudice Austen Facebook

    http://www.much-ado.net/austenbook/

  2. Review the requirements for the next paper: the Lit theory paper.  This will be due Wednesday March _____??  For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE. Copies of the group transparencies are online!  Click HERE To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE.    There is an article called "Unlearning the Myths" in your Lit. Theory packet.  
  3. SOME LIT THEORY PAPER REMINDERS (rev. 11.11.10):

    1.  NOTE ABOUT THE SOURCES WALLY PROVIDED: the Bressler, Appleman, and Dobie TITLED articles are from books on literary theory.  The TITLED articles by Smith and Murfin appear in the back of either Frankenstein by Mary Shelley or Hamlet by William Shakespeare.  Follow the format in the Survival Manual pp. WC 17-18 for "When you use only a titled chapter or titled article in a book or pamphlet." 

    Mary Shelley's name and William Shakespeare's name will appear on your works-cited page but NOT in any parenthetical references.  By the way, her name is spelled SHELLEY.

    2.  Stories in anthologies are in quotation marks.   ex. "Cinderella"    Stories that are published as books are italicized.   ex.  Cinderella

    3.  For a copy of how the paper should be organized, click HERE.

    4.  If you do the paper with a partner, turn in one copy of the paper, with both names listed in the heading.  For the pagination, type both last names with an "and" in between them.  Turn in one grading sheet, but make sure both of you have put your comments in the comment box.  The paper should be slipped into both folders.

    5.  Here's how you write the following:  PhD or  master's degree or MA.

    6.  Be consistent with capitalization.  Either use "Reader Response" or "reader response."  Pay attention to how your sources capitalize the theories.  Pick a style and be consistent.

    7.  ABOUT HIGHLIGHTING ON PAPER AND SOURCES!  Do not highlight anything in the actual paper.  Photocopy the pages from the sources you have used.  Only highlight what you used in the sources you have borrowed from the bins AND those YOU have located on your own so that I may easily locate the place on the source for the doc. checks.  You do not have to highlight anything from the folk/fairy tales.  If the folk/fair tales are not paginated, please do so in pencil on the pages OR using post-its.

    8.  Make sure you punctuate dialogue and any stage directions correctly.  Make sure you use the Survival Manual pages GRS 11-13 to help you do this.

    9.  Be sure you document the storyline frequently in the section where you are retelling the story.  Unless you have a direct quote, it is best to do it episodically.

    10.  Read the GRADING SHEET carefully,  so you don't miss anything required.  Be sure to establish credibility--both for your narrator as well as the REAL sources you use.

    11.  E-mail or voice mail Wally (952 975-4303) if you have any questions.

    12. The paper must be turned in by 3:00 on the due date or it's late (-10% per day late)!

    13.  Including THOUGHTS can be tricky. The thoughts are indicated in BLUE.

    Example writing the paper in 1st person:

    I walk into the classroom really excited about the hour I am about to spend with the students in Ms. Anderson's Literary Theory 101 class.  I hope they will enjoy hearing about Thumbelina through feminist perspective and maybe will want to take my own online course as a result. 

    I clear my throat and say, "Good morning, class." I wonder if anyone is listening.  I yell, "Hello!  My name is Sara Madison."  They are still talking!  Is there no discipline in the college classrooms today?  I'll try again.  "Quiet!" I screamed. Finally, I get their attention.

    Example writing the paper in 3rd person:

    The professor thought, "I wonder if he is actually going to ask that question."   
     
    Then Professor Madison asked, "How many of you have read the story?"  She speculated that no one had.  Then she added, "Let me phrase it another way, then." She wondered if the hour would ever end and whether teaching was really her calling after all.

    14. NOTE:  Be careful with tense!  Are you going to write the paper as the hour enfolds?  If so, you will be writing primarily in the present tense when it comes to the classroom events.  You can also choose to write the paper as if the event has already transpired; you would be reflecting back on how the events unfolded.  In that case, you would write primarily in the past tense.

    15.  Pay special attention to stories that are "compiled by" or "retold by" or "adapted by."  They require special treatment for works cited and parenthetical documentation. See page WC 12 for how to do a translator, editor, compiler, or adapter.  

    Click  HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)  Also, check out the section WITH EDITOR or TRANSLATOR or COMPILER   in the PDQ section of the Survival Manual.  Click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

    Buybacks 

    Notes: 1.  Record your results on the yellow and pink sheets in your folder.   By the way, Mr. Olson doesn't like to use the boxes at the end of the grading sheet.  He prefers that you read his comments in the margins to find the positives and suggestions.  You must summarize these in the pink boxes and write a goal for the next paper.  Then, record your number of errors in Lit. Analysis Paper column on the yellow technical sheet.) 2.   Be sure to follow directions! There will be a lot less "mercy" for not doing correcting the error correctly this time.   3.  YOU ARE REQUIRED TO WRITE OUT THE WHOLE SENTENCE THAT HAS THE ERROR(S).  DO NOT USE ELLIPSES!  4.  Make sure you do not make ANY NEW ERRORS.  If two or more errors occur in the same sentence, follow the specific directions on how to correct them all together.  5.   TURN BUYBACKS IN ON TIME!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  5.  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE. (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample (NOT PERFECT) of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

    NOTE!  You may organize your buybacks by type of error or chronologically as they appear in your paper

WALLIES ONLY:

  1. Get HAMLET by Wednesday!  Your copy of HAMLET MUST be the Signet Classic. They are available in the school store for $3.50. 

  2. EXTRA CREDIT (3 pts.) COUPON OPPORTUNITY(to be stapled on a future journal or HW assignment)!  Which Hamlet character are you?  Go online to                   http://www.selectsmart.com/FREE/select.php?client=hamlet

     and take the Character test for Hamlet.  Print out your results, but do not read any detailed explanations as to who the characters are in the play!  You don't want to know some things yet.

  1. OLES ONLY:  

 

 

  1.  BACKGROUND NOTES ON FRANKENSTEIN. ASSIGNMENT F 1 #1 and #2 and #3 ONLY!  Follow the gray Frankenstein HW packet handed out in class.  If you did not get one, you can access this online by clicking HERE.   So, here's  ASSIGNMENT F 1.  Each group (A-E designated by a post-it note on your gray Frankenstein HW packet) is to do 2 sides of a page of notes (10 pts total): side #1  Background Notes on the Romantic Era from the LBT book pp. 565-576 and side #2 Assigned Group Notes on the topic/articles assigned to your group as follows:   Group A   The Neo-Classical Period (notes from the LBT book pp. 433-444) Group B : Mary Wollstonecroft  Read pink article in salmon Frankenstein packet.  If you don't have the article, click HERE and scroll down until you find the article. Group C-D:  Mary Shelley Read pink article in salmon Frankenstein packet.  If you don't have the article, click HERE and scroll down until you find the article. Group E: Gothic Novel  Read gray article in salmon Frankenstein packet.  If you don't have the article, click HERE and scroll down until you find the article. NOTE: If you were absent today and, therefore, don't know what your group is (A, B, C, D, or E), just choose one!  Click HERE and scroll down until you find the article

    The ROMANTIC MOVEMENT!

    The GRANDFATHERS:

    Samuel Taylor Coleridge

     

    and William Wordsworth:

     

    THE 3 GRANDSONS:

                                  John Keats:

                   

    Lord Byron:

    Percy Bysshe Shelley (husband of Mary Shelley):

     

    the cottage Lord Byron rented on the amazing

    ghost story telling night!

Branagh's Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

DiNiro as the creature and Branagh as Victor

 

James Whale's 1936 Frankenstein

 

TUESDAY, day 26

   

W.H. AUDEN--Check out this website!  These "Auden groupies" (Virtual Street Band) like to make up songs and cartoons to

 Auden's work:
This Virtual Street Band (which only exists and performs in cyberspace) has put 3 poems of Auden to music and made some flash videoclips to go along with them. Checking this site out is totally recommended, the site has a really cool feel to it, and the clips are awesome.
http://www.virtualstreetband.com

"Slave to Beauty"--song to Brueghel's painting

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tT6p1vkq5h4&feature=related

Another cool Auden poem is "Funeral Blues" a.k.a. "Stop All the Clocks."  Here are some cool links to read and view some youtube stuff regarding this awesome poem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9LJ9we02Ls

reading of the poem from the film Four Weddings and a Funeral

Another reading of the poem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcAYsJo3-uM&mode=related&search=

"Funeral Blues" to music James Horner

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HqZZXuIiJEY

ALSO, click on the link below to watch Elizabeth Susan Hambleton, a painter from New York, NY, read "Musee": http://www.favoritepoem.org/thevideos/hambleton.html

The Great Gatsby

      

Today's Quotes of the Day

from The Great Gatsby:

Page 8 "Gatsby turned out all right at the end; it is what preyed on Gatsby, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dreams that temporarily closed out my interest in the abortive sorrows and short-winded elations of men."

Page 100-101 "It is invariably saddening to look through new eyes at things upon which you have expended your own powers of adjustment."

Page 118 "It occurred to me that there was no difference between men, in intelligence or race, so profound as the difference between the sick and the well."

Page 170 "They were careless people, Tom and Daisy — they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made…"

Page 171 "I became aware of the old island here that flowered once for Dutch sailors’ eyes — a fresh, green breast of the new world. Its vanished trees, the trees that had made way for Gatsby’s house, had once pandered in whispers to the last and greatest of all human dreams; for a transitory enchanted moment man must have held his breath in the presence of this continent, compelled into an aesthetic contemplation he neither understood nor desired, face to face for the last time in history with something commensurate to his capacity for wonder."

Page 172 "tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms further…And on fine morning - / So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."

 

Today's Allusion:

Emporer's New Clothes

Today's Words of the Day:

mundane (Oles)

audacious (Oles)

 Elysian (Wallies)

empirical (Wallies)

JOHN DONNE

CHECK OUT SOME SLAM POETRY EXAMPLES:

Bassey Ikpi's  "Homeward"  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTcOWR3uc0E&feature=related

Diallo  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tj4C8riMsKI

Apology to My Unborn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzyrHsYTveE&feature=related

OR  Alicia Keys "POW" and discuss TONE and what support there is for her tone interpretation (DIDLS) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLk_Q3Cq2Ns  

Steve Coleman "I want this poem"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3bbpj2hX6w&feature=related

Eric Darby Scratch & Dent Dreams

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfTa4B7wQ_8

Oscar Brown, Jr. "This Beach"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRFb-D1gYY0&feature=related

Favorite Poem project   Musee"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlbFQ5ZtjVY&feature=related

Auden himself reading "Musee"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZqftCZD2NI

Slave to Beauty  (inspired by "Musee")

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tT6p1vkq5h4&feature=related

Four Weddings and a Funeral  Auden's "Stop All the Clocks"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_a-eXIoyYA&feature=related

another "Stop All the Clocks" with film clips

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1O4LGBxEeA&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1O4LGBxEeA&feature=related

 

WALLIES:

Group Check-in:

  • Go over TONE exercises--each group does a different page
  • choose a poetry group leader
  1. Burning questions on the lit theory paper?
  2. INTRO: SLAM POETRY--WHAT IS SLAM POETRY?--Show  Taylor Mali's poems/video "Conviction" or "Totally Like" or play Taylor Mali "Proofreading" poem or show video from Bowery Club or Taylor Mali's poems/video  "Teachers" and Bassey Ikpi's "Silence" and Rat Sack "I'm Losing You"

    MORE SLAM POETRY?--Show  9 min.  video from Bowery Club ("Forgetfulness" & "Introduction" and "Proofreading" or Bassey Ipki's "Homeward"or Rat Sack "I'm Losing You" or Poetry "Krispy Kreme" or Alicia Keyes on youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLk_Q3Cq2Ns

     

  3. TONE/MOOD WORK

    "C'mon Lou" tone activity

    Show TONE/MOOD words from exercise pages and Poetry Packet and relate those to "Musee" and "Out, Out--"Click HERE for a sheet on more specific tone words. You may have to look up some words (i.e., simpering, bantering, pedantic, disdainful, sardonic?)   pages E1, E3, E4 in the Poetry packet and look at the words to describe tone. 

    TONE ex. multiple choice answers.  Try to come to consensus. Write group answers down. Click HERE to print out a copy of this exercise.

    Gatsby excerpt--CLICK HERE  FOR THE GATSBY,  Look for around 5 words from these pages (or of your own choice) which best describe the TONE of this passage.  Write them down right by your original evaluation of TONE.  Do these words fit what you thought from the outset--positive, negative, neutral, indifferent?

    Camus passage ( from The Stranger) on page E6 of the Poetry packet.  Do the same thing as you did with the Gatsby excerpt.  If you would like a copy of this passage to print out and mark up, click HERE.

  4. "Musee" Read aloud and groups look for DIDLS:  tone, diction, imagery, syntax, etc. in "Musee des Beaux Arts"  CLICK HERE FOR A COPY OF "MUSEE"  Discuss  "Musee"--Gut reaction--is "Musee" an optimistic or a pessimistic poem.  What are the universal questions?  Why did I have you read "Meditation l7"?  What connections are there?  Click HERE for MUSEE section of poetry packet. 
  5. NEW TERMS TODAY:  essay,  schema, metaphor, simile conceit, syntax, stanza, rhyme, paradox/oxymoron, mood, DIDLS (diction, imagery, details, language, syntax), juxtaposition, apostrophe, quatrain, couplet, octave, sestet, slant rhyme, essay, rhyme, slant rhyme, tone, mood, rhythm, sprung rhythm, ITAD:  iambic (u/), trochaic (/u), anapestic (uu/), dactylic (/uu), monometer, dimeter, trimeter, tetrameter, pentameter, hexameter, heptameter, , meter, foot, sonnet--2 types: Shakespearean (3 quatrains=abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd or ? heroic couplet, , euphony, cacophony, euphemism, pejorative. maxim,   irony.  imagery,   denotation, connotation,  symbol,  

    HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

    WALLIES:

  6. stamp WA 12 M + M + 6 Degrees (15 pts)
  7. 4 poems & cover sheet (25 pts)

Check it out! WALLY'S NEW COOL POETRY LINKS!

NEW LINKS 2010!

BBC POETRY SEASON

http://www.bbc.co.uk/poetryseason/

BBC TOP BRITISH POETS 2010 VOTE RESULTS

http://www.bbc.co.uk/poetryseason/vote_results.shtml

Benjamin Zephaniah 3rd place

http://www.benjaminzephaniah.com/content/304.php

BOWERY POETRY CLUB NYC

http://www.bowerypoetry.com/

Auden reading "Musee"--poetry animations but his real voice

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZqftCZD2NI&feature=related

Yeats reading "Innisfree"--poetry animations but his real voice

http://www.youtube.com/user/poetryanimations#p/u/424/_Xty-kkMmKU

Stevie Smith reading "Not Waving"--poetry animations but her real voice

http://www.youtube.com/user/poetryanimations#p/u/451/s8KIr98WDtc

Big Country performing their "Not Waving but Drowning"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1_qqjJXBEc

Do not go gentle--Dylan Thomas reading to art images

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ygvTW-6dH8g&feature=related

another option Dylan Thomas

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E9Y9oKuCdbQ&feature=fvw

Rodney Dangerfield in Back to School reading Dylan Thomas' "Do not go gentle"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTv1Dmu5CYc&feature=related

Gina Loring "Somewhere There is a Poem"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PovgQ8jd0Q&feature=related

 

OLES:

  1. Group check-in:
    • Words of the Day
    • Share assigned articles from last night
  2. FRANKENSTEIN BACKGROUND INFO--MWS--Author Intro
  3. groups A-E  do "presentation" on assigned articles; A--
  4. Neo-Classical Movement/17 & 18th C, (group A helps)
  5. Mary Wollstonecroft & William Godwin (group B helps)
  6. Mary Shelley (group C helps)
  7. Share Gothic Novel genre (group E helps) and

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

OLES:

  1. Stamped Romantic Era and Frankenstein background notes  (F1 parts 1 and 2)

Interested in websites on Shakespeare?  Click HERE!

Check out some fun youtube Shakespeare LINKS:

For the reduced Shakespeare company's rendition of R&J part 1, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzVyqiskpMk&mode=related&search=

For the reduced Shakespeare company's rendition of R&J part 2, click (starts with balcony scene) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKUyq-uCZr0&mode=related&search=

For a fun video with Rowan Atkinson and Hugh Laurie spoofing Shakesepare and "To be or not to be," click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwbB6B0cQs4

For a spoof on Shakespeare's life, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OY4HdGJcJVo

To see a Shakespeare in Love music video set to "If you're not the one" Daniel Bedingfield, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l40Syu0sKYM

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:
  1. Work on Lit theory paper:  due Wednesday March _____  For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper, click HERE. Copies of the group transparencies are online!  Click HERE To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

    SOME LIT THEORY PAPER REMINDERS (rev. 11.11.10):

    1.  NOTE ABOUT THE SOURCES WALLY PROVIDED: the Bressler, Appleman, and Dobie TITLED articles are from books on literary theory.  The TITLED articles by Smith and Murfin appear in the back of either Frankenstein by Mary Shelley or Hamlet by William Shakespeare.  Follow the format in the Survival Manual pp. WC 17-18 for "When you use only a titled chapter or titled article in a book or pamphlet." 

    Mary Shelley's name and William Shakespeare's name will appear on your works-cited page but NOT in any parenthetical references.  By the way, her name is spelled SHELLEY.

    2.  Stories in anthologies are in quotation marks.   ex. "Cinderella"    Stories that are published as books are italicized.   ex.  Cinderella

    3.  For a copy of how the paper should be organized, click HERE.

    4.  If you do the paper with a partner, turn in one copy of the paper, with both names listed in the heading.  For the pagination, type both last names with an "and" in between them.  Turn in one grading sheet, but make sure both of you have put your comments in the comment box.  The paper should be slipped into both folders.

    5.  Here's how you write the following:  PhD or  master's degree or MA.

    6.  Be consistent with capitalization.  Either use "Reader Response" or "reader response."  Pay attention to how your sources capitalize the theories.  Pick a style and be consistent.

    7.  ABOUT HIGHLIGHTING ON PAPER AND SOURCES!  Do not highlight anything in the actual paper.  Photocopy the pages from the sources you have used.  Only highlight what you used in the sources you have borrowed from the bins AND those YOU have located on your own so that I may easily locate the place on the source for the doc. checks.  You do not have to highlight anything from the folk/fairy tales.  If the folk/fair tales are not paginated, please do so in pencil on the pages OR using post-its.

    8.  Make sure you punctuate dialogue and any stage directions correctly.  Make sure you use the Survival Manual pages GRS 11-13 to help you do this.

    9.  Be sure you document the storyline frequently in the section where you are retelling the story.  Unless you have a direct quote, it is best to do it episodically.

    10.  Read the GRADING SHEET carefully,  so you don't miss anything required.  Be sure to establish credibility--both for your narrator as well as the REAL sources you use.

    11.  E-mail or voice mail Wally (952 975-4303) if you have any questions.

    12. The paper must be turned in by 3:00 on the due date or it's late (-10% per day late)!

    13.  Including THOUGHTS can be tricky. The thoughts are indicated in BLUE.

    Example writing the paper in 1st person:

    I walk into the classroom really excited about the hour I am about to spend with the students in Ms. Anderson's Literary Theory 101 class.  I hope they will enjoy hearing about Thumbelina through feminist perspective and maybe will want to take my own online course as a result. 

    I clear my throat and say, "Good morning, class." I wonder if anyone is listening.  I yell, "Hello!  My name is Sara Madison."  They are still talking!  Is there no discipline in the college classrooms today?  I'll try again.  "Quiet!" I screamed. Finally, I get their attention.

    Example writing the paper in 3rd person:

    The professor thought, "I wonder if he is actually going to ask that question."   
     
    Then Professor Madison asked, "How many of you have read the story?"  She speculated that no one had.  Then she added, "Let me phrase it another way, then." She wondered if the hour would ever end and whether teaching was really her calling after all.

    14. NOTE:  Be careful with tense!  Are you going to write the paper as the hour enfolds?  If so, you will be writing primarily in the present tense when it comes to the classroom events.  You can also choose to write the paper as if the event has already transpired; you would be reflecting back on how the events unfolded.  In that case, you would write primarily in the past tense.

    15.  Pay special attention to stories that are "compiled by" or "retold by" or "adapted by."  They require special treatment for works cited and parenthetical documentation. See page WC 12 for how to do a translator, editor, compiler, or adapter.  

    Click  HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)  Also, check out the section WITH EDITOR or TRANSLATOR or COMPILER   in the PDQ section of the Survival Manual.  Click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

  2. Work on Buybacks for the CLT paper if you got it back.

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.

     (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! 

WALLIES ONLY:

  1.  Add a 4th side to  WA 12 "M and M + 6 Degrees + MORE!" ("Musee des Beaux Arts" and "Meditation l7" and 6 Degrees) This will NOW be a minimum of a four-sider = 20 points. Read some additional poetry or related readings about Auden, Donne, or their poetry.  These related readings/poetry are in the BLUE POETRY packet--pages OP 20-29.   Click HERE for a copy of the blue poetry packet to see these pages.  You might also want to listen to Susan Hambleton read "Musee" and talk about it, too.  If so, go to this website:  http://www.favoritepoem.org/thevideos/hambleton.html

    In addition, you may also go online and find some related readings and/or poetry by Donne or Auden.  If you include commentary, etc., found online, BE SURE to give me the titles of the websites and the URL's. 

     

  2. Refresh your memory on your group poems.  Be ready to "vote" for the Group Poem for your group's poetry project.  Brainstorm  ideas for your group's poetry project!    If you need to see a copy of the gray poetry project grading sheet, click HERE.  Here's that great help sheet--"How to Explicate a Poem." To print out a copy of our AP 12 POETRY TERMS!  Click HERE.

  3. AP essay for "A Woman's World"--spend 10 min. planning and 30 min. writing!   (The poem and prompt is on page P9 in your blue Poetry Packet.  So you can actively read the poem, you can print it out by clicking HERE.).

    Be sure to do the  prewriting on the yellow sheet provided in class.   If you need a copy of this poem and the prewriting sheets, click HERE. This prewriting will be collected as well. Spend no more than 10 minutes on this prewriting. 

    When done with prewriting, set your timer for 30 minutes and write the essay.  Stop exactly at 30 minutes. 

    After writing (or typing--DS, please!) the essay, look closely at the RUBRIC (click HERE for a copy)--available in narrative and in the form of a chart which we will use to grade your essay) go to pages AP 3 and AP 4 in your Poetry Packet.  Read the rubrics.  

    Give yourself a predicted score (1-9) and tell why you think you'll get that score.  (This is OLD ASSIGNMENT Q) 

    OPTIONAL:  The Controversial "Death of a Toad" AP Essay!  Click HERE if you would like to read the most controversial essay ever in the grading of an AP essay.  Rumor has it that this essay was discussed for over 2 hours before the AP graders came to resolution!  The essay was based on Wilburs' "The Death of a Toad."  Read all applicable parts (also on pages AP 11-15 in the blue Poetry Packet.  I'll share what happened with this essay later).  

         

    Eavan Boland

     

    Wally (and Carina age 10) meet Eavan Boland

  4. EXTRA CREDIT (3 pts.) COUPON OPPORTUNITY(to be stapled on a future journal or HW assignment)!  What Hamlet character are you?  Go online to                   http://www.selectsmart.com/FREE/select.php?client=hamlet

     and take the Character test for Hamlet.  Print out your results, but do not read any detailed explanations as to who the characters are in the play!  You don't want to know some things yet.

  1.  

 

OLES ONLY:

  1. ASSIGNMENT F1 #3:  AUTHOR INTRO: Take at least one side of a page of notes on the Author Introduction and Percy's Preface in your Frankenstein book.  Add it to your F1 materials from yesterday.

  2. ASSIGNMENT F 2: #5, #6, #7 ONLY!  #5: Start reading FRANKENSTEIN. Read in Frankenstein Walton's Narrative (letters 1-4)    #6:  Read the Prometheus hand-out and jot down some questions based on this reading.  If you need a copy of this hand-out, open up the PDF file of the first Frankenstein Hand-out Packet.  The Prometheus hand-out is pp. 27-31.  Click HERE and scroll down for this hand-out. #7 Make FIG questions over this material:  1 of each level--pink = level 1 factual, blue = level 2 interpretive, gold = level 3 global. Click HERE to refresh your memory as to how to do FIG questions.

 

WEDNESDAY, day 27

Lady Macbeth: "Out, out, damned spot!"

Synchronicity!  Wally was in Stratford dining at the Dirty Duck (next to the Royal Shakespeare Company's Theatre, The Courtyard, and it just so happened that the table she sat down at had this quote next to it on the wall!  Recognize it?

the STRATFORD TRAIN STATION

Wally in front of Shakespeare's grave in Stratford,

October 2008

Check out my blog!  http://england2008lindapaula.blogspot.com/

Shakespeare WORD OF THE DAY:

anon (uh-NON) adverb

   1. At another time.

   2. Soon.

   3. At once; immediately (archaic).

[From Middle English, from Old English on an, (in one).]

"Anon, King Hamlet discovers [.  .  .].  Threatened with banishment, poverty, and disgrace, Claudius  [. . .].." Witty, Wise, Then Weary, The Economist (London), Feb 19, 2000.

Q:  Where is Hamlet supposedly set? 

A:  in Kronborg Castle in Helsingør or Elsinore, Denmark (see pix!)

 

Elsinore

the courtyard where Hamlet is done every summer!

To learn more about Hamlet's castle, Kronborg, at Elsinore, click on these links:

http://www.copenhagenpictures.dk/kronborg.html

http://www.ses.dk/157000c

Wally at Kronborg Castle in Helsingør or Elsinore, Denmark pointing to her pal Shakespeare

Shakespeare Country

Shakespeare's last home

 

Stratford-on-Avon and Holy Trinity Church

Holy Trinity Church (where Shakespeare is buried) in Stratford on the the Avon River

Anne Hathaway's cottage

To see more pictures of London, click here!

Today's Quote of the Day:

I hate cameras.  They are so much more sure than I am about everything.  ~John Steinbeck


Did you ever wonder if the person in the puddle is real, and you're just a reflection of him?  ~
Calvin and Hobbes

It makes sense to make a map of places where you can get eaten by bears, or where there's a bottomless pit, but when you get into making maps of your mind, you're basically wasting your time.

Today's Allusion:

NIMBY

Today's Words of the Day:

epigram (Oles)

euphonic (Oles)

nefarious (Wallies)

 nepotism  (Wallies)

Shakespeare WORD OF THE DAY:

hie (hy) verb tr., intr. To hasten; to go in a hurry.[From Middle English hien, from Old English higian (to strive).]

Today's word in Visual Thesaurus: http://visualthesaurus.com/?w1=hie

"Aniston reportedly hied out of town to meet hubby Brad Pitt in Little Rock, Ark." Michael Sneed; The Rice Report; Chicago Sun-Times; Nov 18, 2004.

Interested in websites on Shakespeare? 

Check out some fun youtube Shakespeare LINKS: Click HERE.

insults generator:

http://www.william-shakespeare.org.uk/a1-shakespearean-insults-generator.htm

For more fun, click HERE!

For the reduced Shakespeare company's rendition of R&J part 1, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzVyqiskpMk&mode=related&search=

For the reduced Shakespeare company's rendition of R&J part 2,

click (starts with balcony scene) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKUyq-uCZr0&mode=related&search=

For a fun video with Rowan Atkinson and Hugh Laurie spoofing

Shakesepare and "To be or not to be," click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwbB6B0cQs4

For a spoof on Shakespeare's life, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OY4HdGJcJVo

To see a Shakespeare in Love music video set to

"If you're not the one" Daniel Bedingfield, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l40Syu0sKYM

FUN SHAKESPEARE YOUTUBE LINKS:

Rowan Atkinson interviews Hugh Laurie as Shakespeare

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwbB6B0cQs4&feature=related

amateur Globe Theatre tour

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptgEU91cUzI&feature=related

short tour of Globe theatre to music

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOHvMIsAiLc&feature=related

Brush up your Shakespeare from Kiss Me Kate--version 1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-CSb3Xe06s&feature=related

Brush up your Shakespeare from Kiss Me Kate--version 2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSmZfnax1yw

History of Shakespeare--Brief and Naughty

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQGATTeg1Os&NR=1

Big Brother "Who's Shakespeare?"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bPHyVOA7iI&feature=related

Beatles do Shakespeare

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bPHyVOA7iI&feature=related

amateur Globe Theatre tour

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptgEU91cUzI&feature=related

short tour of Globe theatre to music

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOHvMIsAiLc&feature=related

WALLIES:
  1. Group check-in:
  • How did Boland AP essay go

    Share something from WA 12

    Poetry groups

     

  1. Burning questions on the lit theory paper or on Buybacks
  2. Show 2nd Dead Poets clip where Keating has students rip out chapter one (5 min.)

     

  3. HOW DID AP ESSAY GO?

  4. Work on the Poetry Presentation. Decide on poem and brainstorm  ideas for your group's poetry project!    If you need to see a copy of the gray poetry project grading sheet, click HERE.  Here's a great help sheet--"How to Explicate a Poem." To print out a copy of our AP POETRY TERMS!  Click HERE.

  5. "Musee" Read aloud and groups look for DIDLS:  tone, diction, imagery, syntax, etc. in "Musee des Beaux Arts"  CLICK HERE FOR A COPY OF "MUSEE"  Discuss  "Musee"--Gut reaction--is "Musee" an optimistic or a pessimistic poem.  What are the universal questions?  Why did I have you read "Meditation l7"?  What connections are there?  Click HERE for MUSEE section of poetry packet. 

    a.  SHARE SOMETHING FROM THE BACK OF YOUR WA--MORE ON AUDEN--something from page OP 20-24; OP 26-29 AND what you each thought about one of the "Musee" reviews, and Brian Russell's e-mail. 

    b.  Leftovers from "Musee"-What are the universal questions

    c.  John Donne & six degrees theory Why did I have you read "Meditation l7"?  What connections are there?

    d.  Read NY Times article "The Way We Were" and discuss how the poem is effectively used--the ploughman, where the last sentence uses word "signifying" (allusion),

    e.  Show Billy Collins parody on "Musee"   

    f. read Macbeth's speech "To-morrow and to-morrow"

    g. Read "Out, Out" again as groups look for tone, DIDLS.  Maybe view video.   Favorite Poem project  "Out, out"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1V07Hu5d_Dg&feature=user

    h.  Discuss Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

     If you would like to read Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery," you can get a copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

  6. Gatsby excerpt--CLICK HERE  FOR THE GATSBY,  Look for around 5 words from these pages (or of your own choice) which best describe the TONE of this passage.  Write them down right by your original evaluation of TONE.  Do these words fit what you thought from the outset--positive, negative, neutral, indifferent?

    Camus passage ( from The Stranger) on page E6 of the Poetry packet.  Do the same thing as you did with the Gatsby excerpt.  If you would like a copy of this passage to print out and mark up, click HERE.

  7. NEW TERMS TODAY:  essay,  schema, metaphor, simile conceit, syntax, stanza, rhyme, paradox/oxymoron, mood, DIDLS (diction, imagery, details, language, syntax), juxtaposition, apostrophe, quatrain, couplet, octave, sestet, slant rhyme, essay, rhyme, slant rhyme, tone, mood, rhythm, sprung rhythm, ITAD:  iambic (u/), trochaic (/u), anapestic (uu/), dactylic (/uu), monometer, dimeter, trimeter, tetrameter, pentameter, hexameter, heptameter, , meter, foot, sonnet--2 types: Shakespearean (3 quatrains=abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd or ? heroic couplet, euphony, cacophony, euphemism, pejorative. maxim,   irony.  imagery  denotation, connotation,  symbol,  

    HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

    WALLIES:

     

  8. AP ESSAY, planning, scoresheet
  9. WA 12 M + M + 6 degrees + MORE on Donne & Auden

OLES:

  1. Group check-in:
  • Word of the Day
  • FIG Q's
  1. Author Intro (groups B & C help)
  2. Byron's Prometheus
  3. Discuss Letters

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

OLES:

  1. Stamped ASSIGNMENT F 1.   2 sides of a page of notes (10 pts total): side #1  Background Notes on the Romantic Era  and side #2 Assigned Group Notes 
  2. Stamp F1 Author Intro and Percy's Preface (5 points)
  3. FIG Q's--stamp

the "Elizabeths"!

Queen Elizabeth II (alive and on the throne of England today!)

 

 Queen Elizabeth I (1500's)

Judi Dench played Queen Elizabeth I in Shakespeare in Love

Anne Hathaway's cottage

To see more pictures of London, click here!

Anne of the Thousand Days

the love story of Anne Boleyn and King Henry VIII

WAR OF THE ROSES!

(click HERE for genealogical chart)

   

or more info on this part of history, go to the website below:

http://englishhistory.net/tudor/monarchs/boleyn.html

to read their love letters, go here:

http://englishhistory.net/tudor/letter10.html

to learn more about him, go here:

http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/tudor.htm

to learn more about the other wives, go here:

http://englishhistory.net/tudor/monarchs/wives.html

or here:

http://www.larmouth.demon.co.uk/sarah-jayne/wives/wives.html

Tower Bridge in London

 

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:
  1. FOR FUN, take a look that this Austen Pride & Prejudice  Facebook page

    http://www.much-ado.net/austenbook/

    Work on Lit theory paper:  due Wednesday March _____  For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper, click HERE. Copies of the group transparencies are online!  Click HERE To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

    SOME LIT THEORY PAPER REMINDERS (rev. 11.11.10):

    1.  NOTE ABOUT THE SOURCES WALLY PROVIDED: the Bressler, Appleman, and Dobie TITLED articles are from books on literary theory.  The TITLED articles by Smith and Murfin appear in the back of either Frankenstein by Mary Shelley or Hamlet by William Shakespeare.  Follow the format in the Survival Manual pp. WC 17-18 for "When you use only a titled chapter or titled article in a book or pamphlet." 

    Mary Shelley's name and William Shakespeare's name will appear on your works-cited page but NOT in any parenthetical references.  By the way, her name is spelled SHELLEY.

    2.  Stories in anthologies are in quotation marks.   ex. "Cinderella"    Stories that are published as books are italicized.   ex.  Cinderella

    3.  For a copy of how the paper should be organized, click HERE.

    4.  If you do the paper with a partner, turn in one copy of the paper, with both names listed in the heading.  For the pagination, type both last names with an "and" in between them.  Turn in one grading sheet, but make sure both of you have put your comments in the comment box.  The paper should be slipped into both folders.

    5.  Here's how you write the following:  PhD or  master's degree or MA.

    6.  Be consistent with capitalization.  Either use "Reader Response" or "reader response."  Pay attention to how your sources capitalize the theories.  Pick a style and be consistent.

    7.  ABOUT HIGHLIGHTING ON PAPER AND SOURCES!  Do not highlight anything in the actual paper.  Photocopy the pages from the sources you have used.  Only highlight what you used in the sources you have borrowed from the bins AND those YOU have located on your own so that I may easily locate the place on the source for the doc. checks.  You do not have to highlight anything from the folk/fairy tales.  If the folk/fair tales are not paginated, please do so in pencil on the pages OR using post-its.

    8.  Make sure you punctuate dialogue and any stage directions correctly.  Make sure you use the Survival Manual pages GRS 11-13 to help you do this.

    9.  Be sure you document the storyline frequently in the section where you are retelling the story.  Unless you have a direct quote, it is best to do it episodically.

    10.  Read the GRADING SHEET carefully,  so you don't miss anything required.  Be sure to establish credibility--both for your narrator as well as the REAL sources you use.

    11.  E-mail or voice mail Wally (952 975-4303) if you have any questions.

    12. The paper must be turned in by 3:00 on the due date or it's late (-10% per day late)!

    13.  Including THOUGHTS can be tricky. The thoughts are indicated in BLUE.

    Example writing the paper in 1st person:

    I walk into the classroom really excited about the hour I am about to spend with the students in Ms. Anderson's Literary Theory 101 class.  I hope they will enjoy hearing about Thumbelina through feminist perspective and maybe will want to take my own online course as a result. 

    I clear my throat and say, "Good morning, class." I wonder if anyone is listening.  I yell, "Hello!  My name is Sara Madison."  They are still talking!  Is there no discipline in the college classrooms today?  I'll try again.  "Quiet!" I screamed. Finally, I get their attention.

    Example writing the paper in 3rd person:

    The professor thought, "I wonder if he is actually going to ask that question."   
     
    Then Professor Madison asked, "How many of you have read the story?"  She speculated that no one had.  Then she added, "Let me phrase it another way, then." She wondered if the hour would ever end and whether teaching was really her calling after all.

    14. NOTE:  Be careful with tense!  Are you going to write the paper as the hour enfolds?  If so, you will be writing primarily in the present tense when it comes to the classroom events.  You can also choose to write the paper as if the event has already transpired; you would be reflecting back on how the events unfolded.  In that case, you would write primarily in the past tense.

    15.  Pay special attention to stories that are "compiled by" or "retold by" or "adapted by."  They require special treatment for works cited and parenthetical documentation. See page WC 12 for how to do a translator, editor, compiler, or adapter.  

    Click  HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)  Also, check out the section WITH EDITOR or TRANSLATOR or COMPILER   in the PDQ section of the Survival Manual.  Click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

  2. Work on Buybacks for the CLT paper if you got it back.

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.

     (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! 

WALLIES ONLY:

  1. Study for tomorrow SCANSION QUIZ.  If you like, take the yellow practice scansion quiz handed out in class today.  Click HERE if you need a copy.

  2.  BE AN AP READER!  Read the AP essays on pages AP 5-10 in the blue Poetry Packet and score them using the rubric on pp. AP 3-4.  (old ASSIGNMENT R: ) Make sure you write down justification for the scores on the essays themselves. For a copy of the essays in the Poetry packet, click HERE and scroll down.   Set up your paper landscape in 6 columns:

    _____________________________________________________

    sample C       sample D       sample          sample F          sample O        sample PP

    Score: ___      Score: ___     Score: ___   Score: ___         Score: ___     Score: ___

    Rationale:      Rationale:       Rationale:    Rationale:        Rationale:       Rationale

     

    ____________________________________________________

     

  3. Work on your own part of the Poetry Presentation. Brainstorm even more ideas for your group's poetry project!    If you need to see a copy of the gray poetry project grading sheet, click HERE.  Here's a great help sheet--"How to Explicate a Poem." To print out a copy of our AP POETRY TERMS!  Click HERE.

  4.  Ask your parents if they have ever read Hamlet, what they remember about it (DO NOT LET THEM GIVE AWAY THE PLOT), and if they have a copy of it for you to bring to class tomorrow for an extra credit coupon. See the picture of Katie and her mom's (actively read!) Hamlet book.

    Check out my vintage Shakespeare book!

    Wally's Hamlet book!

     

  5. ASSIGNMENT H1 #1. & 2. & 3 

    CLICK HERE FOR A COPY OF THE PURPLE HAMLET ASSIGNMENT PACKET.

    #1.  Elizabethan Background Notes    Take a minimum of 1 side of a page of NOTES on your assigned topic. (Your topic is assigned by COLOR/POETRY GROUPS!!!!)

    NO ONE DOES THIS ONE this year--2010!  Topic A = ____________= NORTON EXPERT (use the salmon hand-outs from the Norton Anthology.  Click HERE if you need them.)  Read and take notes from the Norton, vol. 6.  Read "The Sixteenth Century 1485-1603" (pp. 395-top of p. 406 and mid pp. 409 - 413).   Also, read "William Shakespeare 1564-1616" (pp. bottom of 801 - 803).  CLICK HERE FOR THESE SALMON PAGES  IF YOU DIDN'T GET THEM IN CLASS.

    OR choose this topic:

    Topic B = GOLD GROUP = LBT BACKGROUND EXPERT and SHAKESPEARE’S BIOGRAPHY Read and take notes on the information from these TWO sources:

    ·        LBT black textbook pp. 191-201; 224-225  Take notes!

    ·        the chapter, "William Shakespeare 1564-1616," pp. bottom of 865-top of 868, in the Norton Anthology of English Literature (use the GOLDENROD hand-outs from the Norton Anthology.  CLICK HERE FOR THESE GOLDENROD PAGES IF YOU DIDN'T GET A COPY OF THE NORTON IN CLASS.)

                                     

    Topic C BLUE GROUP= BIOGRAPHY & AUTHORSHIP CONTROVERSY  & CANON  Using your Signet Classic edition of Hamlet, read and take notes on

    ·        "Shakespeare:  An Overview"--sections "Biographical Sketch,"

    ·        "A Note on the Anti-Stratfordians, Especially Baconians and Oxfordians," and

    ·        "The Shakespeare Canon" on pp. vii-xviii (new book).

    Topic D =GREEN CORNER GROUP= SHAKESPEARE'S THEATER  Using your Signet Classic edition of Hamlet read and take notes on"Shakespeare:  An Overview,""Shakespeare's Theater" and "A Note on the Use of Boy Actors in Female Roles" on pp. xxvi-xxxvi.      

    OR choose this topic:

    Topic E =GREEN CORNER GROUP = SHAKESPEARE'S DRAMATIC LANGUAGE:  COSTUMES, GESTURES AND SILENCES, PROSE AND POETRY  Using your Signet Classic edition of Hamlet, read and take notes on "Shakespeare's Dramatic Language:  Costumes, Gestures and Silences; Prose And Poetry", "The Play Text as a Collaboration" and "Editing Texts" on pp. xxxvi-liv (new book).  

    Topic  F GREEN UNDER THE CLOCK GROUP = SHAKESPEARE ON THE STAGE  Using your Signet Classic edition of Hamlet, read and take notes on "Shakespeare on the Stage" on pp. liv-lxi   (new book)  AND  Sylvan Barnet's article, "Hamlet on Stage and Screen" in the new book on pp. 239-256.

    OR choose this topic:

    Topic G GREEN UNDER THE CLOCK GROUP = SHAKESPEARE’S ENGLISH  Using your Signet Classic edition of Hamlet read and take notes on "Shakespeare:  An Overview"--"Shakespeare's English" on pp. xviii-xxv (new book).

     #2.  Look over the hand-out "Words, Words, Words" in your the ivory Hamlet PACKET.  Jot down some interesting findings on the BACK of your Elizabethan background notes.  FYI! click HERE for a copy of the ivory Hamlet PACKET. 

     #3.  WA 13 "Quotes to Consider" (a.k.a. HWA 1 in the HW packet)   It is a 2 sider.  See the  pink page of the Hamlet Packet for these boxes of quote choices.  On the back side of this journal, choose three Hamlet quotes from the salmon list of Hamlet Significant Quotes and without looking at the text, predict what you think each of the three quotes might be about.  FYI! click HERE for a copy of the ivory HAMLET PACKET.  CLICK HERE FOR A COPY OF THE PURPLE HAMLET ASSIGNMENT PACKET.

  6. EXTRA CREDIT (3 pts.) COUPON OPPORTUNITY(to be stapled on a future journal or HW assignment)!  What Hamlet character are you?  Go online to                   http://www.selectsmart.com/FREE/select.php?client=hamlet

     and take the Character test for Hamlet.  Print out your results, but do not read any detailed explanations as to who the characters are in the play!  You don't want to know some things yet.

     

  7. INSULTING WORD, WORDS, WORDS!  EXTRA CREDIT COUPON (3 pts.) OPPORTUNITY! 

    Make 3 Shakespearean Insult Cards!  Click HERE for a copy of this EC assignment and HERE for a sample of how the cards should look.

    a.  Do the "Shakespearean Expressions (Insult) Activity."  Click HERE to find a three-columned list of Shakesearean words.   Warning!  These words are unkind!  They are insults! 

    b.  Choose ONE line of 3 words—one from each column.  You will have two adjectives and a noun and must find their modern translations.  To do this, you must go to the EPHS library and locate the multi-volume Oxford English Dictionary.  Look up your three words in the Oxford English Dictionary (the OED).   

    The new electronic version of The Oxford English Dictionary is available through our EPHS Library Electronic Resources page. Please find the OED and the other electronic resources to which we subscribe at http://www.edenpr.org/ephs/departments/media/.   Select Electronic Resources on left of screen. The password for remote access to OED is edenhs1. The Electronic Resources Passwords sheet has been updated to reflect the OED addition in the Teacher Shared > Media Center > Electronic Resources Dec 2008 folder.

    c.  Now, take out 3 note cards.  Write #1 ADJ on the first card and copy the word from column one onto this first note card.  On the back of this note card, write the modern English translation of this word. Do the same for the second and third words.  Write #2 ADJ on the second card and copy the word from column two onto this first note card.  On the back of this note card, write the modern English translation of this word.  On the third note card, take a highlighter and color it yellow (front and back sides).  Then write #3 NOUN and copy the word from column two onto this last note card.  On the back of this note card, write the modern English translation of this word.  

 

  1.  

 

OLES ONLY:

  1. ASSIGNMENT F2 1-4: Samuel Taylor Coleridge's Rime of the Ancient Mariner work! # 1.First, read about Coleridge (p. 594 in the LBT--black textbook Literature:  The British Tradition).  # 2.Then read about  The Rime of the Ancient Mariner's sound devices (p. 595 LBT).  # 3.Now, read the entire Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (LBT pages 596-618), and do SQ's 1-12.  The study questions follow the selection in the LBT on pages 618-619. 

  2. Now you are done with F2! 

    Onward and upward to F3!!               

    Coleridge's Rime of the Ancient Mariner

     

THURSDAY, day 27 -

Wanna see Wally's trip to NYC  Oct. 14-17, 2009?

Click HERE.

Jude Law signing Wally's program

Today's Quote of the Day:

"There is no coming to consciousness without pain. -

Carl Jung, psychiatrist (1875-1961)

Today's Allusion:

NIMBY

Today's Words of the Day:

sanguine

cacophony

euphony

 nepotism

Shakespeare's original GLOBE THEATRE

  

 

PARIS GARDEN--the bear beating arenas!  (Shakespeare's competition)

these pictures below are of London's

NEW GLOBE THEATRE

       

 

Wally's pictures of London from the summer 2006

Wally at the Globe in the summer of 2006

Globe theatre lobby in LONDON!

Entering the Globe for Shakespeare's play Titus Andronicus

(Shakespeare's bloodiest play!

Yes!  Fake blood was spewed on us here!

 

WALLIES:

Group check-in:

  • C/C scores of AP Boland Essay and come to consensus
  • Share background notes on Hamlet & Words, Words, Words, Tragedy, and pp. 3-10 Hamlet--maybe make transp.
  • EC Which Hamlet character are you? selectsmart.com quiz

 

  1. SCANSION TEST

  2. Read "Out, Out" again as groups look for tone, DIDLS.  Maybe view video.   Favorite Poem project  "Out, out"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1V07Hu5d_Dg&feature=user

    h.  Discuss Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

     If you would like to read Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery," you can get a copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

  3. IF TIME, Gatsby excerpt--CLICK HERE  FOR THE GATSBY,  Look for around 5 words from these pages (or of your own choice) which best describe the TONE of this passage.  Write them down right by your original evaluation of TONE.  Do these words fit what you thought from the outset--positive, negative, neutral, indifferent?

    Camus passage ( from The Stranger) on page E6 of the Poetry packet.  Do the same thing as you did with the Gatsby excerpt.  If you would like a copy of this passage to print out and mark up, click HERE.

  4. NEW TERMS TODAY:  essay,  schema, metaphor, simile conceit, syntax, stanza, rhyme, paradox/oxymoron, mood, DIDLS (diction, imagery, details, language, syntax), juxtaposition, apostrophe, quatrain, couplet, octave, sestet, slant rhyme, essay, rhyme, slant rhyme, tone, mood, rhythm, sprung rhythm, ITAD:  iambic (u/), trochaic (/u), anapestic (uu/), dactylic (/uu), monometer, dimeter, trimeter, tetrameter, pentameter, hexameter, heptameter, , meter, foot, sonnet--2 types: Shakespearean (3 quatrains=abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd or ? heroic couplet, euphony, cacophony, euphemism, pejorative. maxim,   irony.  imagery  denotation, connotation,  symbol,  

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

WALLIES:

  1. Background Elizabethan notes
  2. stamp WA 13 Hamlet Quotes to Consider--2 sides + peer commentary  = 15 pts.
  3. EC Which Hamlet character are you? selectsmart.com quiz

OLES:

  1. Group check-in:
  • weekend?
  • Words of the Day
  1. Discuss "Rime" study questions
  2. Discuss "Rime" in terms of mimetics
  3. if time, Show 16 min. clip Great Books on Frankenstein:  The Making of a Monster

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

OLES:

  1. Collect completed F1 assignments
  2. Stamp F2 Rime of the Ancient Mariner (20 points) (Coleridge background, SQ's 11 points, Prometheus notes)

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:
  1. Fantastic Healthy Fodd Friday!  REMEMBER TO BRING A HEALTHY TREAT TOMORROW (continuing in our fine AP tradition!)
  2. Work on Buybacks for the CLT paper if you got it back.

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.

     (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! 

  3. Work on Lit theory paper:  due Wednesday March 24! For a copy of the "diagram" of the outline of the paper, click HERE (it was on the overhead when Mr. Olson did his Marxist reading of Hansel & Gretel). For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper, click HERE. Copies of the group transparencies are online!  Click HERE To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

    ORDER TO TURN IN THE PAPER:

    • everything goes in folder (if partners, put both folders inside each other)
    • grading sheet filled out
    • paper
    • works cited
    • source from class used (no need to highlight)
    • all other sources (no need to highlight)
    • the folk/fairy tale (no need to highlight)
    • SECURITY copy--not in folder
    • SOME LIT THEORY PAPER REMINDERS (rev. 11.11.10):

      1.  NOTE ABOUT THE SOURCES WALLY PROVIDED: the Bressler, Appleman, and Dobie TITLED articles are from books on literary theory.  The TITLED articles by Smith and Murfin appear in the back of either Frankenstein by Mary Shelley or Hamlet by William Shakespeare.  Follow the format in the Survival Manual pp. WC 17-18 for "When you use only a titled chapter or titled article in a book or pamphlet." 

      Mary Shelley's name and William Shakespeare's name will appear on your works-cited page but NOT in any parenthetical references.  By the way, her name is spelled SHELLEY.

      2.  Stories in anthologies are in quotation marks.   ex. "Cinderella"    Stories that are published as books are italicized.   ex.  Cinderella

      3.  For a copy of how the paper should be organized, click HERE.

      4.  If you do the paper with a partner, turn in one copy of the paper, with both names listed in the heading.  For the pagination, type both last names with an "and" in between them.  Turn in one grading sheet, but make sure both of you have put your comments in the comment box.  The paper should be slipped into both folders.

      5.  Here's how you write the following:  PhD or  master's degree or MA.

      6.  Be consistent with capitalization.  Either use "Reader Response" or "reader response."  Pay attention to how your sources capitalize the theories.  Pick a style and be consistent.

      7.  ABOUT HIGHLIGHTING ON PAPER AND SOURCES!  Do not highlight anything in the actual paper.  Photocopy the pages from the sources you have used.  Only highlight what you used in the sources you have borrowed from the bins AND those YOU have located on your own so that I may easily locate the place on the source for the doc. checks.  You do not have to highlight anything from the folk/fairy tales.  If the folk/fair tales are not paginated, please do so in pencil on the pages OR using post-its.

      8.  Make sure you punctuate dialogue and any stage directions correctly.  Make sure you use the Survival Manual pages GRS 11-13 to help you do this.

      9.  Be sure you document the storyline frequently in the section where you are retelling the story.  Unless you have a direct quote, it is best to do it episodically.

      10.  Read the GRADING SHEET carefully,  so you don't miss anything required.  Be sure to establish credibility--both for your narrator as well as the REAL sources you use.

      11.  E-mail or voice mail Wally (952 975-4303) if you have any questions.

      12. The paper must be turned in by 3:00 on the due date or it's late (-10% per day late)!

      13.  Including THOUGHTS can be tricky. The thoughts are indicated in BLUE.

      Example writing the paper in 1st person:

      I walk into the classroom really excited about the hour I am about to spend with the students in Ms. Anderson's Literary Theory 101 class.  I hope they will enjoy hearing about Thumbelina through feminist perspective and maybe will want to take my own online course as a result. 

      I clear my throat and say, "Good morning, class." I wonder if anyone is listening.  I yell, "Hello!  My name is Sara Madison."  They are still talking!  Is there no discipline in the college classrooms today?  I'll try again.  "Quiet!" I screamed. Finally, I get their attention.

      Example writing the paper in 3rd person:

      The professor thought, "I wonder if he is actually going to ask that question."   
       
      Then Professor Madison asked, "How many of you have read the story?"  She speculated that no one had.  Then she added, "Let me phrase it another way, then." She wondered if the hour would ever end and whether teaching was really her calling after all.

      14. NOTE:  Be careful with tense!  Are you going to write the paper as the hour enfolds?  If so, you will be writing primarily in the present tense when it comes to the classroom events.  You can also choose to write the paper as if the event has already transpired; you would be reflecting back on how the events unfolded.  In that case, you would write primarily in the past tense.

      15.  Pay special attention to stories that are "compiled by" or "retold by" or "adapted by."  They require special treatment for works cited and parenthetical documentation. See page WC 12 for how to do a translator, editor, compiler, or adapter.  

      Click  HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)  Also, check out the section WITH EDITOR or TRANSLATOR or COMPILER   in the PDQ section of the Survival Manual.  Click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

       

WALLIES ONLY:

  1. OPTIONAL:  If you would like to read Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery," you can get a copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  Here's an interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

  2. Comment on someone else's Journal WA 13 "Quotes to Consider"  The comments on your ideas can be in the margins or at very end of WA 13 Quotes to Consider.  This journal with the commenting is now worth 15 points (+5 for the commenting).  If you didn't exchange with a classmate, have someone you know read and comment (this person doesn't have to have read Hamlet at all).

  3. ASSIGNMENT H2 #1-7:                CLICK HERE FOR A COPY OF THE PURPLE HAMLET ASSIGNMENT PACKET. #1 Read the yellow hand-out in the ivory Hamlet packet "Actively Reading or Marking a Textbook."  Click HERE for a copy of the ivory HAMLET PACKET.  #2:  Read carefully over the material about all the themes and motifs in the PURPLE HAMLET ASSIGNMENT PACKET #3: Read over the "dramatis personae" (cast list) on p. 2 in your Hamlet text. #4: Using the suggestions given in the yellow hand-out in the ivory Hamlet packet "Actively Reading or Marking a Textbook," actively read pp. 3-10 (Act 1.1) in Hamlet.  #5:  Re-read the scene again.  When in doubt, SHOUT it out!  (Try it aloud!)   #6:  BE READY FOR YOUR FIRST HAMLET QUIZ OVER THIS MATERIAL!                        #7:  For a 3 pt. extra credit coupon, take the Hamlet Selector Quiz : "What Hamlet character are you?"  Go online to   http://www.selectsmart.com/FREE/select.php?client=hamlet and take the Character test for Hamlet.  Print out your results, but do not read any detailed explanations as to who the characters are in the play!  You don't want to know some things yet.

  4. Work on your own part of the Poetry Presentation. Brainstorm even more ideas for your group's poetry project!    If you need to see a copy of the gray poetry project grading sheet, click HERE.  Here's a great help sheet--"How to Explicate a Poem." To print out a copy of our AP POETRY TERMS!  Click HERE.

  5. INSULTING WORD, WORDS, WORDS!  EXTRA CREDIT COUPON (3 pts.) OPPORTUNITY! 

    Make 3 Shakespearean Insult Cards!  Click HERE for a copy of this EC assignment and HERE for a sample of how the cards should look.

    a.  Do the "Shakespearean Expressions (Insult) Activity."  Click HERE to find a three-columned list of Shakesearean words.   Warning!  These words are unkind!  They are insults! 

    b.  Choose ONE line of 3 words—one from each column.  You will have two adjectives and a noun and must find their modern translations.  To do this, you must go to the EPHS library and locate the multi-volume Oxford English Dictionary.  Look up your three words in the Oxford English Dictionary (the OED). 

    c.  Now, take out 3 note cards.  Write #1 ADJ on the first card and copy the word from column one onto this first note card.  On the back of this note card, write the modern English translation of this word. Do the same for the second and third words.  Write #2 ADJ on the second card and copy the word from column two onto this first note card.  On the back of this note card, write the modern English translation of this word.  On the third note card, take a highlighter and color it yellow (front and back sides).  Then write #3 NOUN and copy the word from column two onto this last note card.  On the back of this note card, write the modern English translation of this word. 

    Interested in websites on Shakespeare?  Click HERE!   Check out some fun youtube Shakespeare LINKS Click HERE.

    For the reduced Shakespeare company's rendition of R&J part 1, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzVyqiskpMk&mode=related&search=

    For the reduced Shakespeare company's rendition of R&J part 2, click (starts with balcony scene) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKUyq-uCZr0&mode=related&search=

    For a fun video with Rowan Atkinson and Hugh Laurie spoofing Shakesepare and "To be or not to be," click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwbB6B0cQs4

    For a spoof on Shakespeare's life, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OY4HdGJcJVo

    To see a Shakespeare in Love music video set to "If you're not the one" Daniel Bedingfield, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l40Syu0sKYM

    Hamlet newspaper front page

    Hamlet downloadable Multiple Critical Perspectives

    http://www.prestwickhouse.com/pc-11078-39-hamlet-downloadable-multiple-critical-perspectives.aspx?category=5

    Create a study guide for a scene in Hamlet

    http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=dg384q3w_62d77658

    Artwork inspired by Hamlet

    http://www.english.emory.edu/classes/Shakespeare_Illustrated/Shakespeare.html

     

OLES ONLY:

 

 

  1. ASSIGNMENT F3 #1-5:            #1-2:  "Kubla Khan"  #3 "Old Familiar Faces" in Frankenstein Packet.  Click HERE and scroll down in the Frankenstein Packet for this poem on the Supplementary Poems goldenrod sheet.  #4 READ Chaps. 1-5 of Victor's Narrative (Can you explain allusion to the Rime of the Ancient Mariner?), and #5 make FIG questions over this material:  1 of each level--pink = level 1 factual, blue = level 2 interpretive, gold = level 3 global.  Click HERE to refresh your memory as to how to do FIG questions.

  2. Remember to write one set of FIG Q's for Frankenstein chapters 1 - 5.

 

Day 28  Friday, March 12, 2010

     

 

Are you intrigued by the "Authorship Controversy"?  Click HERE to learn more!

Lisa Wilson, Wally's Oxfordian friend who is working on the Roland

Emmerich film Soul of an Age which will "expose" the controversy to the world

Lisa Wilson and Wally

Try a few of these sites for starters:

http://www.shakespearefellowship.org/

http://www.shakespearefellowship.org/faq.html

http://shakespeare.palomar.edu/life.htm#Authorship

http://shakespeareauthorship.com/

To read more about the controversy surrounding

the Droeshout engraving, try this website:

http://www.william-shakespeare.info/william-shakespeare-droeshout-engraving.htm

Shakespeare dictionary

http://www.william-shakespeare.info/william-shakespeare-dictionary.htm

another

http://absoluteshakespeare.com/glossary/a.htm

 

Today's Quotes of the Day:

Those who put out the people's eyes, reproach them for their blindness.

-John Milton, poet (1608-1674)

It came to me that reform should begin at home, and since that day I have not had time to remake the world. -

Will Durant, historian (1885-1981)

Today's Allusion:

left-handed compliment

Today's Words of the Day:

wanton

ephemeral

sanguine

odius

 

 

Shakespeare WORD OF THE DAY:

ere = before     
–preposition, conjunction
before.

[Origin: bef. 900; ME; OE ǣr, ér (c. G ehr), comp. of ār soon, early; c. Goth air. See erst, early]

 

Interested in websites on Shakespeare? 

Check out some fun youtube Shakespeare LINKS: Click HERE.

insults generator:

http://www.william-shakespeare.org.uk/a1-shakespearean-insults-generator.htm

For more fun, click HERE!

For the reduced Shakespeare company's rendition of R&J part 1, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzVyqiskpMk&mode=related&search=

For the reduced Shakespeare company's rendition of R&J part 2,

click (starts with balcony scene) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKUyq-uCZr0&mode=related&search=

For a fun video with Rowan Atkinson and Hugh Laurie spoofing

Shakesepare and "To be or not to be," click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwbB6B0cQs4

For a spoof on Shakespeare's life, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OY4HdGJcJVo

To see a Shakespeare in Love music video set to

"If you're not the one" Daniel Bedingfield, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l40Syu0sKYM

FUN SHAKESPEARE YOUTUBE LINKS:

Rowan Atkinson interviews Hugh Laurie as Shakespeare

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwbB6B0cQs4&feature=related

amateur Globe Theatre tour

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptgEU91cUzI&feature=related

short tour of Globe theatre to music

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOHvMIsAiLc&feature=related

Brush up your Shakespeare from Kiss Me Kate--version 1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-CSb3Xe06s&feature=related

Brush up your Shakespeare from Kiss Me Kate--version 2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSmZfnax1yw

History of Shakespeare--Brief and Naughty

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQGATTeg1Os&NR=1

Big Brother "Who's Shakespeare?"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bPHyVOA7iI&feature=related

Beatles do Shakespeare

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bPHyVOA7iI&feature=related

amateur Globe Theatre tour

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptgEU91cUzI&feature=related

short tour of Globe theatre to music

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOHvMIsAiLc&feature=related

OLES & WALLIES TOGETHER (15 min)

  1. Group check-in:
  • weekend?

  • Progress on the lit theory paper?

  • lit theory "Singing Lesson" quiz

  1. Intro CC#1
  2. Go over lit theory "Singing Lesson" quiz
  3.  Olson does Marxist "Hansel & Gretel" with Wally showing outline and due date and pink slip due
  4. Burning questions on the lit theory paper?

OLES:

  1. Group check-in:
  • weekend?
  • Words of the Day
  1. Freaky stuff on meme and memetics
  2. Discuss chaps 1-5
  3. if time, show 16 min. clip Great Book video Frankenstein:  The Making of a Monster

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

OLES:

  1. Stamp   F2 Rime of the Ancient Mariner (20 points) (Coleridge background, SQ's 11 points, Prometheus notes)
  2. Stamped chs 1-5 FIGs

    Stamped F3  (Kubla Khan & notes)

 

WALLIES ONLY:

  1. Group check-in:
  • weekend?
  • HAMLET: group quiz--(pp. 3-10)
  • If time, make transparency of Hamlet notes
  1. Tips on quizzes--how this will work
  2. Intro to HAMLET--folio vs. quartos, authorship controversy, film versions, tips on how to actively read, themes, motifs, "Words Words Words" hand-out, 37 plays, setting, willing suspension of disbelief, Shakespeare's settings, Wittenberg, time of opening scene, Shakespeare's competition, the Globe, tragedies vs. comedies vs. histories, authorship controversy---Share group background notes on Hamlet
 

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

WALLIES:

  1. WA 12  POETRY  M + M + 6 degrees + MORE
  2. WA 13 Hamlet Quotes to Consider--2 sides + peer commentary  = 15 pts.
  3. EC Which Hamlet character are you? selectsmart.com quiz
  1.  

 
BOTH OLES & WALLIES:
  1.  CC#1 (at least one side of a page): 

    A "CC" is a "class-connected journal."   It is like a PR but for Wally or Olson. 

    It deals with a topic that came to mind during the course of this week or the preceding week of class or anytime in class. It might have been inspired by something said in class discussion, something in the literature, something you wanted to bring up but didn't get the chance, etc.  Let your imagination go wild, but you must show a clear CLASS CONNECTION (CC).  Explain where you got the idea/when the idea came up if you think I might need some explanation of how the CC is class connected.

  2. Work on Lit theory paper:  due Wednesday March 24th For a copy of the "diagram" of the outline of the paper, click HERE (it was on the overhead when Mr. Olson did his Marxist reading of Hansel & Gretel).  For a copy of the Lit. Theory paper, click HERE. Copies of the group transparencies are online!  Click HERE To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

    ORDER TO TURN IN THE PAPER:

    • everything goes in folder (if partners, put both folders inside each other)
    • grading sheet filled out
    • paper
    • works cited
    • source from class used (no need to highlight)
    • all other sources (no need to highlight)
    • the folk/fairy tale (no need to highlight)
    • SECURITY copy--not in folder

      SOME LIT THEORY PAPER REMINDERS (rev. 11.11.10):

      1.  NOTE ABOUT THE SOURCES WALLY PROVIDED: the Bressler, Appleman, and Dobie TITLED articles are from books on literary theory.  The TITLED articles by Smith and Murfin appear in the back of either Frankenstein by Mary Shelley or Hamlet by William Shakespeare.  Follow the format in the Survival Manual pp. WC 17-18 for "When you use only a titled chapter or titled article in a book or pamphlet." 

      Mary Shelley's name and William Shakespeare's name will appear on your works-cited page but NOT in any parenthetical references.  By the way, her name is spelled SHELLEY.

      2.  Stories in anthologies are in quotation marks.   ex. "Cinderella"    Stories that are published as books are italicized.   ex.  Cinderella

      3.  For a copy of how the paper should be organized, click HERE.

      4.  If you do the paper with a partner, turn in one copy of the paper, with both names listed in the heading.  For the pagination, type both last names with an "and" in between them.  Turn in one grading sheet, but make sure both of you have put your comments in the comment box.  The paper should be slipped into both folders.

      5.  Here's how you write the following:  PhD or  master's degree or MA.

      6.  Be consistent with capitalization.  Either use "Reader Response" or "reader response."  Pay attention to how your sources capitalize the theories.  Pick a style and be consistent.

      7.  ABOUT HIGHLIGHTING ON PAPER AND SOURCES!  Do not highlight anything in the actual paper.  Photocopy the pages from the sources you have used.  Only highlight what you used in the sources you have borrowed from the bins AND those YOU have located on your own so that I may easily locate the place on the source for the doc. checks.  You do not have to highlight anything from the folk/fairy tales.  If the folk/fair tales are not paginated, please do so in pencil on the pages OR using post-its.

      8.  Make sure you punctuate dialogue and any stage directions correctly.  Make sure you use the Survival Manual pages GRS 11-13 to help you do this.

      9.  Be sure you document the storyline frequently in the section where you are retelling the story.  Unless you have a direct quote, it is best to do it episodically.

      10.  Read the GRADING SHEET carefully,  so you don't miss anything required.  Be sure to establish credibility--both for your narrator as well as the REAL sources you use.

      11.  E-mail or voice mail Wally (952 975-4303) if you have any questions.

      12. The paper must be turned in by 3:00 on the due date or it's late (-10% per day late)!

      13.  Including THOUGHTS can be tricky. The thoughts are indicated in BLUE.

      Example writing the paper in 1st person:

      I walk into the classroom really excited about the hour I am about to spend with the students in Ms. Anderson's Literary Theory 101 class.  I hope they will enjoy hearing about Thumbelina through feminist perspective and maybe will want to take my own online course as a result. 

      I clear my throat and say, "Good morning, class." I wonder if anyone is listening.  I yell, "Hello!  My name is Sara Madison."  They are still talking!  Is there no discipline in the college classrooms today?  I'll try again.  "Quiet!" I screamed. Finally, I get their attention.

      Example writing the paper in 3rd person:

      The professor thought, "I wonder if he is actually going to ask that question."   
       
      Then Professor Madison asked, "How many of you have read the story?"  She speculated that no one had.  Then she added, "Let me phrase it another way, then." She wondered if the hour would ever end and whether teaching was really her calling after all.

      14. NOTE:  Be careful with tense!  Are you going to write the paper as the hour enfolds?  If so, you will be writing primarily in the present tense when it comes to the classroom events.  You can also choose to write the paper as if the event has already transpired; you would be reflecting back on how the events unfolded.  In that case, you would write primarily in the past tense.

      15.  Pay special attention to stories that are "compiled by" or "retold by" or "adapted by."  They require special treatment for works cited and parenthetical documentation. See page WC 12 for how to do a translator, editor, compiler, or adapter.  

      Click  HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)  Also, check out the section WITH EDITOR or TRANSLATOR or COMPILER   in the PDQ section of the Survival Manual.  Click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

  3. Work on Buybacks for the CLT paper if you got it back.

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.

     (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! 

REMINDER!  NEXT WEEK IS OUR GUTHRIE MACBETH FIELDTRIP ON WEDNESDAY, March 17 (St. Patrick's Day)! TELL YOUR TEACHERS YOU'LL MISS HOURS 2-4!   TO PREPARE, CONSIDER DOING THE FOLLOWING

  READ A PLOT SYNOPSIS (at least for Acts 1-2).  Click HERE for a plot synopsis.            READ A REVIEW! Click http://www.guthrietheater.org/whats_happening/shows/2009/macbeth

 for an overview review of the production.   

Click HERE for a review.                                                 CHECK OUT THE GUTHRIE WEBSITE!  Click http://www.guthrietheater.org/

 for the Guthrie website.                                     CHECK OUT THE NEW SHAKESPEARE AT THE GUTHRIE WEBSITE Click http://www.guthrietheater.org/shakespeare for the newest addition to the Guthrie website--"50 Years of Shakespeare at the Guthrie"--complete with memories--find the one written by Wally for a 3 pt. EC coupon!--anecdotes, photos of former Guthrie Shakespeare productions, and youtube links. 

the three weird sisters

Lady Macbeth: "Out, out, damned spot!"

 

WALLIES ONLY:
  1. ASSIGNMENT H

  2. ASSIGNMENT H3 #1-3: CLICK HERE FOR A COPY OF THE PURPLE HAMLET ASSIGNMENT PACKET. #1.  Read pp. 1/2 of p. 10 to 1/2 of page 14 (stop right before the first soliloquy).  Do the questions on the Act I. sc. 2  buff-colored quiz that apply to these pages (#1 -16 ).  Click HERE for a copy of this Act I. sc. 2 buff-colored quiz.  #2.  Answer the 3 Opening Court Q's in your HW packet on page 84.   Click HERE for a copy of these questions.   #3. Do AP Practice Q's 1-7 in ivory AP MC packet.  Click HERE to get a pdf. copy of the AP Practice tests.  You may use supplementary sources to look up words like synecdoche, etc.  If you haven't already, it might be a good idea to print out/use the following:

    FOR A COPY OF OUR 2009 AP LIT POETRY TERMS PACKET, CLICK HERE!  YOU MAY WANT TO PRINT THIS!

    FYI! click HERE for a copy of the ivory HAMLET PACKET.

     

  3. Work on your own part of the Poetry Presentation. Brainstorm even more ideas for your group's poetry project!    If you need to see a copy of the gray poetry project grading sheet, click HERE.  Here's a great help sheet--"How to Explicate a Poem." To print out a copy of our AP POETRY TERMS!  Click HERE.

  4. INSULTING WORD, WORDS, WORDS!  EXTRA CREDIT COUPON (3 pts.) OPPORTUNITY! 

    Make 3 Shakespearean Insult Cards!  Click HERE for a copy of this EC assignment and HERE for a sample of how the cards should look.

    To see a Shakespeare in Love music video set to "If you're not the one" Daniel Bedingfield, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l40Syu0sKYM

 

OLES ONLY:

 

 

     

    1. ASSIGNMENT F 4:  #1, 2, 3  #1 chaps. 6-10, #2 make FIG questions over this material:  1 of each level--pink = level 1 factual, blue = level 2 interpretive, gold = level 3 global.  Click HERE to refresh your memory as to how to do FIG questions  #3 EVERYONE DOES   GROUP A: THE BYRON EXPERTS (You will need to read Byron's poem "Prometheus" on the goldenrod Supplementary Poetry with Frankenstein hand-out.)  (NOTE: If you need this hand-out, click HERE.  You will need to scroll down in the PART TWO: FRANKENSTEIN HAND-OUTS PACKET to find this particular hand-out.)  AND:  GROUP C: THE PERCY SHELLEY EXPERTS.

 

     

2011stuff

  1. WA ___:  Final Poem Analysis. Your choices for this final poem analysis are all in your POETRY PACKET. 

     For a pdf. copy of the BLUE POETRY PACKET, click HERE!

    If you would like to print out a copy of these so you can have your own copy to actively mark up, click HERE.  Here are your choices:

    a.        "The World is Too Much With Us"  by William Wordsworth (p. P29)

    b.       "God's Grandeur" by Gerard Manley Hopkins  (p. P309)

    c.        "Any Human to Another" by Countee Cullen  (p. P31)

    d.       "The Death of a Toad"  by  Richard Wilburs.   (p. P32)

    Click HERE to if you would like the hand-out "HOW TO EXPLICATE A POEM."  To print out a copy of our ADV. 12 POETRY TERMS, click HERE