Click below to move directly to another week:

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NOTE!  If you have trouble with the above links, always go back to the link below that says "Calendar" or to the AP English Home Page and then to the word "CALENDAR."  Make sure the link has an "a" after the week number.  For example, do not go to a link that merely says "week 8."  The link must be RED and say week 8a to work.

back to CALENDAR | back to AP English Home Page

 

WEEK 5a: March 1-4th, 2010

WOW!  WHAT A WEEK!!!

Parent Conferences Tues & Thursday

Click HERE to see our latest 2010 AP LIT. CLASS PICTURES!

March comes in like a _____

 

and out like a _______________?

POETRY  (Wallies)

& GRAMMAR  (Oles)

 

&

Literary Theory (everyone in Wally's room on Thursday)

vs. Lit. Analysis paper on 2 summer novels:  Due date on Monday, March 8.   Click HERE for the Lit. Analysis paper packet.  Click HERE for the grading sheet.

 

Click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  

Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals.

Click HERE to go automatically to the yellow HW packet!

Click HERE for another copy of the 4 week GREEN calendar.

Click HERE for the Literary Time Periods Time line/Works Most Frequently Appearing on the AP Open-ended Essay.

FOR A COPY OF OUR 2010 AP LIT POETRY TERMS PACKET, CLICK HERE!  YOU WILL DEFINITELY WANT TO PRINT THIS!

To print more allusion and vocab sheets, click HERE!

EPHS ENGLISH DEPARTMENT SURVIVAL MANUAL  (rev. 11.22.09)

To print off the entire manual half size or full size or to use the manual online in "navigational mode," go to the EPHS English department home page and click on the buttons to the left of the screen:

http://ephs.edenpr.org/index.php?option=com_qcontacts&view=category&catid=76&Itemid=123

click HERE for the COVER with table of contents  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the GRS (Grammar Rules Summary) section--yellow

click HERE for the MSF (Manuscript Formatting Rules) section--yellow

click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) SHORT FORM--pink

Buybacks 

Notes: 1.  Record your results on the yellow and pink sheets in your folder.   By the way, Mr. Olson doesn't like to use the boxes at the end of the grading sheet.  He prefers that you read his comments in the margins to find the positives and suggestions.  You must summarize these in the pink boxes and write a goal for the next paper.  Then, record your number of errors in Lit. Analysis Paper column on the yellow technical sheet.) 2.   Be sure to follow directions! There will be a lot less "mercy" for not doing correcting the error correctly this time.   3.  YOU ARE REQUIRED TO WRITE OUT THE WHOLE SENTENCE THAT HAS THE ERROR(S).  DO NOT USE ELLIPSES!  4.  Make sure you do not make ANY NEW ERRORS.  If two or more errors occur in the same sentence, follow the specific directions on how to correct them all together.  5.   TURN BUYBACKS IN ON TIME!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  5.  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

 If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE. (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample (NOT PERFECT) of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

NOTE!  You may organize your buybacks by type of error or chronologically as they appear in your paper

 

 

 

 

DATE In-Class plan Homework (due next day almost always):
MONDAY, day 20

Alexander Pope

Today's Quotes of the Day:

"We think our fathers fools so wise we grow

Our wiser sons no doubt will think us so"

Alexander Pope

AND

 "Never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee!"

~John Donne  

 

Captain English!

How about a SNOW DAY this week?

FUN SIGNS! 

(THESE ARE REAL)

 

 

 

WALLIES ONLY:

  1. Group check-in:
  • Weekend
  • How did PR's go?
  • 6 degrees concept?
  • c/c Donne quotes
  1. MODERN TRENDS IN POETRY:  Poet Laureate?  American and British positions, differences, incentives, legacies?  Discuss the SIBL project ("O Captain," "TKM," and Frankenstein songs) www.artistsforliteracy.org and perhaps play "Flight of Icarus" (Iron Maiden) or "Icarus" or "Icarus II" (Kansas) or "Dust in the Wind" or "For Whom the Bell Tolls" by Iron Maiden
  2. Collins "Introduction to Poetry" Click HERE for a copy. and Advice to Writers" and allusion to Alexander Pope! Maybe show DVD of Billy Collins' "How to Read a Poem" and various experts' opinions on poetry and Collins.  
  3. NEW TERMS TODAY:  essay,  schema, metaphor, simile conceit, syntax, stanza, rhyme, paradox/oxymoron, mood, DIDLS (diction, imagery, details, language, syntax), juxtaposition, apostrophe, quatrain, couplet, octave, sestet, slant rhyme, essay, rhyme, slant rhyme, tone, mood, essay, rhythm, sprung rhythm, ITAD:  iambic (u/), trochaic (/u), anapestic (uu/), dactylic (/uu), monometer, dimeter, trimeter, tetrameter, pentameter, hexameter, heptameter, heroic couplet, maxim,  sprung rhythm, irony, meter, foot, sonnet--2 types: Shakespearean (3 quatrains=abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd or ? tone, mood, diction, denotation, connotation, style, imageryeuphony, cacophony, euphemism, pejorative. maxim,   irony.  imagery,   denotation, connotation,  symbol,  

    HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

    WALLIES:

    1. PR #1
     

OLES:

  1. Group check-in:
    • weekend?
    • preparation for grammar test?
  1. Words of the Day
  2. re-check clause homework
  3. finish listening to Fiery Wooing

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

OLES:

  1. stamped 15 sentences homework

 

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. vs. Lit. Analysis paper on 2 summer novels:  Due date on Monday, March 8.   Click HERE for the Lit. Analysis paper packet.  Click HERE for the grading sheet.

    FYI:  ORDER TO TURN IN THE LIT. ANALYSIS PAPER:

    • grading sheet filled out (student parts only! Do not grade yourself!)

    • outline

    • paper

    • works cited

    • photocopy of the title page and back side of title page of each novel

    • highlighted copies of each doc. check--one per novel--in different colors

    • SECURITY copy--turn in (but not in folder with your paper) or e-mailed to Wally by midnight the day the paper is due!

    Read the blue buyback packet to familiarize yourself with the buyback process.  Click HERE for a copy if you need a copy.  NOTE: f buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after! Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure.    If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.  (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!) NOTE!  You can organize your buybacks by type of error or chronologically as they appear in your paper.  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

    1. MISCELLANEOUS: 

      Click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  

      Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals.

      To print more allusion and vocab sheets, click HERE!

     

    WALLIES ONLY:

  2. "The Group Poems Assignment"--Read all the poems assigned to each of your other group members (See the colored sheet you got last week listing all your group members and the poems they were assigned.   If you do not know which poems each group member had, I have attached the poems.  CLICK  HERE.    1.  CHOOSE 4 POEMS !  Do NOT choose your own (the one you did for WA11 Assigned Individual Poem).       2 Fill out a response worksheet  for each poem (worth 5 points per sheet) using the IVORY WORKSHEETS GIVEN OUT IN CLASS--one per poem.  If you were absent, you can click HERE to get the sheets.  Decide which poem is your all-time group favorite to perhaps use at a later date for a group poetry project.  3   Finally,  answer the bullet-point questions on the pink cover "DEBRIEFING THE 5  POEMS ASSIGNMENT (this is worth 5 points, too.)  So, the entire assignment is worth 25 points.  FOR SOME HELP, click HERE to read a cool help sheet called "HOW TO EXPLICATE A POEM."  Also, check out TONE/MOOD words from exercise pages in the Poetry Packet to help you identify tone/mood words for your worksheets.  Click E1, E3, E4 or see these pages in the Poetry packet for TONE/MOOD word.  For a pdf. copy of the BLUE POETRY PACKET, click HERE!
  3. Got HamletYou need a copy of the Signet Classic Hamlet by Monday, March 8th!!  It MUST be the Signet Classic.  They are available in the school store for $3.50. 

 

  1. OLES ONLY:  

 

  1. ASSIGNMENT: Wodehouse phrases & clauses worksheet.  Click HERE if you need one.
  2. Sestina and Habit of perfection practice AP mult. choice.  Click HERE if you need one.

 

TUESDAY, day 21

CONFERENCES 4:30-8:30

Wally's first AP Lit Class 1977

Can you find Mr. McCartan?

Wally and her student Conn AP English --1977

Teacher senior pictures . . . Can you find Wally?

Can you find Ruce, Holm, Strampe, Wally, Sime, Rolf?

EPHS English Dep't 1985!

Today's Quote of the Day:

The radical novelty of modern science lies precisely in the rejection of the belief ... that the forces which move the stars and atoms are contingent upon the preferences of the human heart. -Walter Lippman, journalist (1889-1974)

The human mind is inspired enough when it comes to inventing horrors; it is when it tries to invent a heaven that it shows itself cloddish. -Evelyn Waugh, novelist (1903-1966)

Today's Allusion:

bread and circuses

Things intended to keep people happy and to divert their attention from problems. [Translation of the Latin term panis et circenses, from panis (bread) + et (and), circenses (circuses). The term originated in the satires of Roman poet Juvenal (c. 60-140). Circus refers to the circus games, such as chariot races, held in Roman times. The term has been loan translated into many other languages.

In Spanish, for example, it is pan y toros (bread and bullfights).]"Madrid has set up a series of summits that look a lot like bread and circuses for a domestic audience at time of economic misery."John Vinocur; Still Waiting for a Brave New Europe; The New York Times; Jan 4, 2010.

Today's Words of the Day:

mundane (Oles)

audacious (Oles)

 Elysian (Wallies)

empirical (Wallies)

 

 

WALLIES ONLY:

  1. Group check-in:

    • Words of the Day
    • Favorite poem in each group:              -gold--_______________,                             blue--______________,                            green 1--___________________,                  green 2--___________________
  2. POPE ACTIVITY:  Pope quotes--each person gets a slip and needs to find groups of 2 or three.  Discuss the meaning, the connections to writing, and any poetic devices that surface.  POPE's"Essay on Criticism"  Click HERE for a copy of this poem. What is scansion? Show quiz in Poetry Packet p. T-9 and T-10.  Click HERE for the quizzes.
  3. SONNET:  Define "sonnet" and look at examples of Shakespearean and Petrarchan.  CLICK HERE FOR BASIC ONES TO USE IN CLASS.
  4. NEW TERMS TODAY:  essay,  schema, metaphor, simile conceit, syntax, stanza, rhyme, paradox/oxymoron, mood, DIDLS (diction, imagery, details, language, syntax), juxtaposition, apostrophe, quatrain, couplet, octave, sestet, slant rhyme, essay, rhyme, slant rhyme, tone, mood, rhythm, sprung rhythm, ITAD:  iambic (u/), trochaic (/u), anapestic (uu/), dactylic (/uu), monometer, dimeter, trimeter, tetrameter, pentameter, hexameter, heptameter, , meter, foot, sonnet--2 types: Shakespearean (3 quatrains=abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd, heroic couplet, maxim, irony euphony, cacophony, euphemism, pejorative. maxim,   imagery,   denotation, connotation,  symbol,  

 

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

WALLIES:

  1. stamp WA 12 M + M + 6 Degrees
  2. 4 poems & cover sheet (25 pts)

OLES:

Group check-in:

  • c/c Sc
  1. Go over phrases & clauses worksheet.  Click HERE if you need one.
  2. Go over Sestina and Habit of perfection practice AP mult. choice.  Click HERE if you need one.

 

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

OLES:

  1. stamp Sestina and Habit of perfection practice AP mult. choice.

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. Respond to PR#1  Remember not to give away your identity or reveal anything that might make the other person have a clue as to who you are.  It is preferable to type your response on another sheet of paper to keep your identity safe, but we will accept responses right on the PR, too, if your handwriting is not very recognizable.  Have fun with this one!  Be honest and respectful, of course. Also, when you turn it in tomorrow, be sure to give Wally back the original PR along with your response as well as your post-it.  (See ASSIGNMENT H: #3 for ideas on how to respond. )

  2. vs. Lit. Analysis paper on 2 summer novels:  Due date on Monday, March 8 Click HERE for the Lit. Analysis paper packet.  Click HERE for the grading sheet.

    FYI:  ORDER TO TURN IN THE LIT. ANALYSIS PAPER:

    • grading sheet filled out (student parts only! Do not grade yourself!)

    • outline

    • paper

    • works cited

    • photocopy of the title page and back side of title page of each novel

    • highlighted copies of each doc. check--one per novel--in different colors

    • SECURITY copy--turn in (but not in folder with your paper) or e-mailed to Wally by midnight the day the paper is due!

  3. To print more allusion and vocab sheets, click HERE!

WALLIES ONLY:

  1. Do pink Scansion & Sonnet quiz (If you didn't get one in class today and would like to print out a copy so you don't have to put your answers on notebook paper, click HERE) from Poetry Packet p. T-9 and as well as the Asimov "quiz" on p. T-10 and figure out the Sonnet Types (Shakespearean or Petrarchan) for Sonnets A, B, C on p. T-10.  The following tips/ info should help you.  TO DETERMINE RHYTHM PATTERN: Try  ITAD:  iambic (u/), trochaic (/u), anapestic (uu/), dactylic (/uu), pentameter.   TO DETERMINE RHYME:  You use small letters to designate the rhyming pattern.  For example, use an "a" to designate the last sound at the end of the first line.  Use a "b" to designate a different sound than sound "a."  Use a "c" to designate another different sound than sounds "a" or "b."  Use a "d" to designate another different sound at the end of a line than sounds "a" or "b" or "c," etc.)       

    Example:                                                  

    Small gnats that fly                                                      

    in hot July                                   a                                 

    and lodge in sleeping ears           b                       

    Can rouse therein                      c    

    A trumpet's din                          c                                      

    With Day of Judgment fears.       

    TO FIGURE OUT THE SONNETS ON THE RIGHT COLUMN OF PAGE T 10, YOU NEED TO KNOW THIS:  There are two types of sonnets: Shakespearean (consists of 3 quatrains rhyming like this abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd or? (lots of other options). Click HERE for about 30 sonnets with which to practice.  At the end of the practice sonnets, there's some excellent info. on the sonnet form.   If you would like to read a Shakespearean sonnet every day, click http://www.sonnetaday.com/ for the link.  You can also get a sonnet e-mailed to you every single day by registering at this site!  Ahhh!  Finally, here is an excellent website that gives an overview of the sonnet and all kinds of variations.  Click http://www.sonnets.org/basicforms.htm 

    FOR FUN:  Check out Alan Rickman reading Shakespeare's "Sonnet 130 My Mistress Eyes":

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cw6Swr-ME40&mode=related&search=

  2. Imagery and Tone Practice!

    You will do a variety of activities to practice using the concepts of imagery and tone.  Use the ivory hand-out you got in class today for these exercises. If you were absent, CLICK HERE

    1.  Imagery & Tone in chapter 3 of The Great Gatsby  ( see old ASSIGNMENT P) In your poetry packet, there is

  3. an excerpt (page E8-9) from chapter 3 of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby.   You have an IVORY COPY OF THIS FROM CLASS TODAY.  If you were absent, CLICK HERE  FOR THE GATSBY, THE STRANGER, AND ANOTHER FUN ASIMOV EXERCISE FROM THE POETRY PACKET.    WHAT TO DO:  Read the entire excerpt first.  As you read the excerpt quickly through, think about the mood (your emotional response) and the TONE (the author's attitude towards the topic/subject matter, the scene (the people, the atmosphere, etc.).  Jot down YOUR PERSONAL immediate response to TONE--positive, negative, neutral, indifferent?   Now it 's time to go back and justify/confirm your initial response.   On your copy of the excerpt, look for examples of  DIDLS (Diction, Imagery, Details, Language, Syntax ).  These are the poetic techniques Fitzgerald uses to establish his TONE.  Go back and read the excerpt again SLOWLY.  Concentrate on evidence for each of the DIDLS.  For DICTION, look for interesting/unusual/powerful word choices.  In the margins of the excerpt, JOT down some of those  DICTION examples and what they connote.  Now, especially concentrate on the images Fitzgerald uses to create a picture in the reader's mind of the scene.  Look for sensory images in particular.  In the margins of the excerpt,  jot what you would consider the most effective images.  Now, go back once again and concentrate on the other DIDLS and do the same thing.   When you are done with this, go to the list of TONE words on the ivory packet you got today or from pages E1, E3, E4 in the Poetry packet and look for around 5 words from these pages (or of your own choice) which best describe the TONE of this GATSBY passage. Jot them down.   Do these words fit what you thought from the outset--positive, negative, neutral, indifferent? 

    2 TONE MULTIPLE CHOICE EXERCISES  Click HERE to print out a copy of this exercise.  Read each passage and choose the word that best describes the tone. As you read, underline what parts of the passage made you arrive at your answer.   Click HERE for a sheet on more specific tone words. You may have to look up some words (i.e., simpering, bantering, pedantic, disdainful, sardonic?)

    3 Camus passage ( from The Stranger)   Read the Camus passage ( from The Stranger) on page E6 of the Poetry packet.  Do the same thing as you did with the Gatsby excerpt.   On the back of your GATSBY NOTES, WRITE "STRANGER NOTES."

  4. Got Hamlet You need a copy of the Signet Classic Hamlet by Friday!!  It MUST be the Signet Classic.  They are available in the school store for $3.50. Here's what it looks like

FUN POETRY STUFF FOR ENRICHMENT:

  1. FOR FUN! Check this web page about W.H. Auden's "Musee": http://poetrypages.lemon8.nl/life/musee/museebeauxarts.htm
  2. FOR FUN! Click on the link below to watch Elizabeth Susan Hambleton, a painter from New York, NY, read "Musee": http://www.favoritepoem.org/thevideos/hambleton.html
  3. FOR FUN!   Click on the link below to watch Elizabeth Wojtusik, a teacher from
    Humarock, MA,
    read "Out, Out-": http://www.favoritepoem.org/thevideos/wojtusik.html
  4. FOR FUN!   Click on the link below to watch other people read their favorite poems for the "Favorite Poem" project: http://www.favoritepoem.org/thevideos/index.html  I especially like "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks!  Which do you like best?
  5. For some additional cool websites Wally found online to enhance your experience with Poetry, click HERE! These include audio files of Billy Collins reading his poetry,  etc. etc. etc, and an MPR interviewwith former U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Haas (who discusses about 10 min. into the interview the OJ 1 Kennedy quote about "when power corrupts, literature cleanses").  He also talks about performance poetry vs. the private voice to the quiet of the mind (which he thinks his poetry is best suited to). He says that poetry can live in both places. He admires Gary Snyder as a mentor.  Website to hear this interview of Feb. 15, 2005 is: http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2006/02/15/midmorning2/

    http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2006/02/15/midmorning2/

     

  6. Click HERE to see more of WALLY'S COOL POETRY LINKS! 

  7. FYI--For those of you who are intrigued by Shirley Jackson's short story "The Lottery"and want to read the story, here's a copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html

 

  1. OLES ONLY:  

 

  1. STUDY FOR THE BIG, BAD GRAMMAR TEST!
  2. To print more allusion and vocab sheets, click HERE!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEDNESDAY, day 23

   

W.H. AUDEN--Check out this website!  These "Auden groupies" (Virtual Street Band) like to make up songs and cartoons to

 Auden's work:
This Virtual Street Band (which only exists and performs in cyberspace) has put 3 poems of Auden to music and made some flash videoclips to go along with them. Checking this site out is totally recommended, the site has a really cool feel to it, and the clips are awesome.
http://www.virtualstreetband.com

"Slave to Beauty"--song to Brueghel's painting

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tT6p1vkq5h4&feature=related

Another cool Auden poem is "Funeral Blues" a.k.a. "Stop All the Clocks."  Here are some cool links to read and view some youtube stuff regarding this awesome poem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9LJ9we02Ls

reading of the poem from the film Four Weddings and a Funeral

Another reading of the poem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcAYsJo3-uM&mode=related&search=

"Funeral Blues" to music James Horner

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HqZZXuIiJEY

ALSO, click on the link below to watch Elizabeth Susan Hambleton, a painter from New York, NY, read "Musee": http://www.favoritepoem.org/thevideos/hambleton.html

The Great Gatsby

      

Today's Quotes of the Day

from The Great Gatsby:

Page 8 "Gatsby turned out all right at the end; it is what preyed on Gatsby, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dreams that temporarily closed out my interest in the abortive sorrows and short-winded elations of men."

Page 100-101 "It is invariably saddening to look through new eyes at things upon which you have expended your own powers of adjustment."

Page 118 "It occurred to me that there was no difference between men, in intelligence or race, so profound as the difference between the sick and the well."

Page 170 "They were careless people, Tom and Daisy — they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made…"

Page 171 "I became aware of the old island here that flowered once for Dutch sailors’ eyes — a fresh, green breast of the new world. Its vanished trees, the trees that had made way for Gatsby’s house, had once pandered in whispers to the last and greatest of all human dreams; for a transitory enchanted moment man must have held his breath in the presence of this continent, compelled into an aesthetic contemplation he neither understood nor desired, face to face for the last time in history with something commensurate to his capacity for wonder."

Page 172 "tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms further…And on fine morning - / So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."

 

Today's Allusion:

Tabula Rasa

Today's Words of the Day:

mundane (Oles)

audacious (Oles)

 Elysian (Wallies)

empirical (Wallies)

JOHN DONNE

CHECK OUT SOME SLAM POETRY EXAMPLES:

Bassey Ikpi's  "Homeward"  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTcOWR3uc0E&feature=related

Diallo  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tj4C8riMsKI

Apology to My Unborn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzyrHsYTveE&feature=related

OR  Alicia Keys "POW" and discuss TONE and what support there is for her tone interpretation (DIDLS) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLk_Q3Cq2Ns  

Steve Coleman "I want this poem"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3bbpj2hX6w&feature=related

Eric Darby Scratch & Dent Dreams

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfTa4B7wQ_8

Oscar Brown, Jr. "This Beach"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRFb-D1gYY0&feature=related

Favorite Poem project   Musee"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlbFQ5ZtjVY&feature=related

Auden himself reading "Musee"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZqftCZD2NI

Slave to Beauty  (inspired by "Musee")

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tT6p1vkq5h4&feature=related

Four Weddings and a Funeral  Auden's "Stop All the Clocks"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_a-eXIoyYA&feature=related

another "Stop All the Clocks" with film clips

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1O4LGBxEeA&feature=related

 

 

BOWERY POETRY CLUB

NOVEMBER 10th, 2005

 

Wally, Billy Collins, and Wally's friend Gail in NYC Nov. 12, 2005 right after his performance at the Bowery Poetry Club with Taylor Mali--"Page Meets Stage"

my friends John Wirth (writer/producer of Ghost Whisperer, Nash Bridges, Remington Steele) and Gail Matthius on Saturday Night Live in the early 1980's with their friend Billy Collins

Wally with Taylor Mali at the Bowery Poetry Club in NYC Nov. 12, 2005 For more info. on this club, go here: http://www.bowerypoetry.com/

Billy Collins and Taylor Mali

TAYLOR MALI

"What Teachers Make" on DPJ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAVK2Agtr10&feature=related

"Conviction" on DPJ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCNIBV87wV4&feature=related

 parody of Taylor's "Conviction"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xp7Nh_Z99yY&feature=related

There is a podcast link on this page that you can use to actually hear excerpts from the night of "Page Meets Stage" with Billy Collins and Taylor Mali reading their poetry! It's podcast #1.  Check it out! (maybe you can hear Wally's annoying laugh, too!)

 

 

 

 

WALLIES

  1. Group check-in:

    • Words of the Day
    • C/C scansion quiz
    • Do assigned numbers from TONE EXERCISES
  2. Go over Scansion Quiz--Do Sonnets SONNET:  If needed, look at examples of Shakespearean and Petrarchan.  CLICK HERE FOR BASIC ONES TO USE IN CLASS.
  3. NEW TERMS TODAY:  essay,  schema, metaphor, simile conceit, syntax, stanza, rhyme, paradox/oxymoron, mood, DIDLS (diction, imagery, details, language, syntax), juxtaposition, apostrophe, quatrain, couplet, octave, sestet, slant rhyme, essay, rhyme, slant rhyme, tone, mood, rhythm, sprung rhythm, ITAD:  iambic (u/), trochaic (/u), anapestic (uu/), dactylic (/uu), monometer, dimeter, trimeter, tetrameter, pentameter, hexameter, heptameter, , meter, foot, sonnet--2 types: Shakespearean (3 quatrains=abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd or ? heroic couplet, maxim,  euphony, cacophony, euphemism, pejorative. maxim,   irony.  imagery,   denotation, connotation,  symbol,  

 

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

WALLIES:

  1. stamp 4 poems (25 pts)
  2. stamp WA 10 M + M + 6 degrees +

OLES:

Group check-in:

  • clause preparations
  1. PHRASE & CLAUSE TEST!

 

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

OLES:

  1. WA

 

 

 

BOTH WALLIES and OLES:

  1. FHFF!  TERRIFIC HEALTHY TREAT THURSDAY!
  2. To print more allusion and vocab sheets, click HERE!
  3. vs. Lit. Analysis paper on 2 summer novels:  Due date on Monday, March 8 Click HERE for the Lit. Analysis paper packet.  Click HERE for the grading sheet.

    FYI:  ORDER TO TURN IN THE LIT. ANALYSIS PAPER:

    • grading sheet filled out (student parts only! Do not grade yourself!)

    • outline

    • paper

    • works cited

    • photocopy of the title page and back side of title page of each novel

    • highlighted copies of each doc. check--one per novel--in different colors

    • SECURITY copy--turn in (but not in folder with your paper) or e-mailed to Wally by midnight the day the paper is due!

  4. ASSIGNMENT  OJ #8 INTRO TO LIT. THEORY (20 pts. over a minimum of 4 sides--when you're all done with parts 1-3, this part of this OJ  will be 15 pts.  When you add the 4th part, the journal will finally be a minimum of 4 sides for 20 points)   TONIGHT YOU WILL DO PARTS 1-3 ONLY!  See below!

 Part 1 (min. 1 side): Bressler & Appleman  In your Literary Theory purple packet, read the two articles which introduce literary theory:  "Defining Criticism, Theory, and Literature" by Charles E. Bressler and "The Case for Critical Theory in the Classroom" by Deborah Appleman.  In your minimum of a one-sided journal, label each author clearly and discuss several points of interest from each article. NOTE! If you were not in class today or would like to print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.

 Part 2 (min. 1 side) Group Theory = __________:  Read the articles about your assigned literary theory. These are assigned by LARGE GROUP COLOR GROUPS.  For the second side of this journal, give it your best effort to summarize/explain the literary theory you have been assigned.  Assume our class is your audience and that no one has read these articles.  It is your responsibility to explain the theory using only your journal to do so!  NOTE:  Plan to read your assigned articles (and reread if needed) carefully before you do the summary in your journal. Depending which article you get, this reading may be very challenging.  You will need this material for your next paper

Formalism:  ORANGE (Jasper, Dongwoo, Greg, Andrea, Catherine) If you were absent and need copies of the formalism articles, click  formalism.  

Reader-response: GOLD 1 (Heather, Qian, Andrew, Ann Marie) If you were absent and need copies of the reader-response articles, click reader response.

Psychoanalytic criticism:  GOLD 2 (Dan, Michelle, Nicole, Anna)  If you were absent and need copies of the psychoanalytic articles, click psychoanalytic criticism.

Gender Criticism/Feminist Theory:  BLUE 1 (Nicole, Gretchen, Michelle, Evan, sallie, Andrew) If you were absent and need copies of the gender criticism articles, click  feminist (gender) criticism.

Marxism:   BLUE 2 (Jennifer,Rebecca, Megan, Chris, Cameron)  If you were absent and need copies of the Marxism articles, click  Marxism.

New Historicism:   GREEN 1 (Gary, Shannon, Elizabeth, Christian, Chris, Andy, Christian)  If you were absent and need copies of the new historicism articles, click new historicism.

Deconstruction:  GREEN 2 (Amanda, Julian, Kevin, Max, Robin, Lauren, Zach)  If you were absent and need copies of the deconstruction articles, click deconstruction.

  To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE.  To print a copy of reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

 Part 3 (min. 1 side) Summer Novel Application:   After explaining your theory, choose ONE of the summer reading books which you think your literary theorist would be particularly interested in analyzing.  Write up an analysis/interpretation of some parts of interest in your chosen novel through the lens of your theory.  For example, what would a feminist critic think of the confrontation of Mme. DeFarge and Miss Pross in Tale of Two Cities and why?  How would his or her feminist lens "color" the interpretation?  For example, what would a Marxist critic think of the system of determining wealth in Achebe's Things Fall Apart?

 Part 4 (min. 1 side) Marginalia, Singing, & Shooting :  ( a minimum of one side--DUE MONDAY, MARCH 8th)!   YOU WILL DO THIS 4TH PART OVER THE WEEKEND!  Read the two green articles about active reading--Moore's "How to Read" and Rosenblatt's "Life in the Margins"--which are in the lit. theory packet.  Also, read Billy Collins' poem "Marginalia."  In your OJ, jot down what you thought of these selections. 

Now read the two stories.  Actively read the first one "Singing Lesson" but do not write on the actual story (we need these back).  Instead, either put a sheet of paper alongside the story to make a "margin" for comments or if you would like to print a copy of "The Singing Lesson" to do your ACTIVE READING, click here:   http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/SingLess.shtml            FYI! (especially if you've been assigned Marxism, Feminist/Gender Criticism,  New Historicism, or Psychoanalytic theory:  Here is some biographical information on Katharine Mansfield:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katherine_Mansfield  or  http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/kmansfi.htm        If you would like to print a copy of "Shooting an Elephant," click here: http://www.online-literature.com/orwell/887/   Remember to NOT actively read this story (if you can stand it!).  For some biographical information on Orwell, click here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Orwell

After you have read "Shooting an Elephant" and "Singing Lesson," write up a reaction to the active reading articles, a reaction to the two stories, and then choose one of the two stories and analyze the story through the lens of your assigned theorist.  This is your final part of this journal.  It must be a minimum of 1 side of a page.

WALLIES ONLY:

 

HEADS UP!  Got HamletYou need a copy of the Signet Classic Hamlet by Monday!!  It MUST be the Signet Classic.  They are available in the school store for $3.50.  Here's what it looks like: 

FOR FUN!  Click HERE for a copy of Dave Barry's List of Things to Learn.

 

 
THURSDAY, day 23

CONFERENCES 4:30-8:30

Literary Theory

Kate Mansfield

George Orwell

 

Wally gets her prince!!

Today's Quotes of the Day

(all from George Orwell):

During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act.

For a creative writer possession of the "truth" is less important than emotional sincerity.

Good writing is like a windowpane.

If a man meets with injustice, it is not required that he shall not be roused to meet it; but if he is angry after he has had time to think upon it, that is sinful. The flame is not wring, but the coals are.

But if thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought

Each generation imagines itself to be more intelligent than the one that went before it, and wiser than the one that comes after it

George Orwell

More Orwellian Quotes of the Day:

A tragic situation exists precisely when virtue does not triumph but when it is still felt that man is nobler than the forces which destroy him.

All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.

At 50, everyone has the face he deserves.

Today's Allusion:

Deus ex Machina

Today's Words of the Day:

mercurial (Oles)

metonymy (Oles)

Draconian (Wallies)

disdain (Wallies)

Today's Words of the Day: click HERE for copy of these definitions.

hermeneutics--the study of the methodological principles of interpretation

part of speech:  noun

adj form:  hermeneutical (interpretative)

adv. form:  hermeneutically

sentence from Bressler article in tonight's reading:  "Put another way, if there is only once correct interpretation of a text, what are the hermeneutical principles readers must use to discover this interpretation?" (p. 3)

trick:  Hermes the Greek god of invention, travel, herald, messenger of the other gods.  He brings the interpretation

etymology:  Greek, early modern English

epistemology--the study, theory or science that investigates the origin, nature and grounds of knowledge especially with reference to its limits and validity

part of speech:  noun

other forms:  epistemological, epistemologically, epistemologist

epistemic--of or relating to knowledge or knowing, cognitive

sentence from Bressler article in tonight's reading:  "Providing the academic arena in which those interested in literary theory (literary theorists) can posit philosophical assumptions concerning the nature of the reading process, the epistemological nature of learning, the nature of reality itself, and a host of related concerns, literary theory offers a variety of methodologies that enable readers to interpret a text from different and often conflicting points of view." (p. 11)

trick:  stem--knowledge is the stem

etymology:  Greek, early Modern English

 

  1. Group check-in:

    • Weekend plans?
    • CLT stuff: Share what you know about Imperialism, George Orwell, Kate Mansfield
    • examples of "savoir" vs. "connaitre" (lit., movies, art, music)
     
  2. INTRO LIT. THEORY--show ANTZ film clip, or  Jack and Jill.  OTHER IDEAS:  "Red Riding Hood"  and the Little Freud piece to kick off unit,    "Serendipity and Lit Theory" -- Rachel Kaufman and Julia Callandar's story about Deborah Appleman, read Ada Alden's column about "Slovenly Peter "then do
  3. ROLF-- words of the day:  hermeneutics/(hermeneutical)--the study of the methodological principles of interpretation  and epistemic/ epistemology/ epistemological (related to the cognitive knowledge.  Also--"savoir" vs. "connaitre"
  4. GROUP WORK DISCUSSION AND TRANSPARENCY--click HERE for the 2009 template

    LITERARY THEORY

    maybe Bressler's and Appleman's articles & from OJ 10: Points of interest or importance:

    maybe Savoir vs. connaitre and examples:

    PUT THE FOLLOWING ON the transparency:  Critical attributes of your group's theory:

    1. .

    2. .

    3. .

    4. .

    5. etc.

    Literary theory applied to summer novel

    Folk or fairy tales your theorist in would most likely be interested:

    Lit. theory applied to "Singing" or "Shooting"--do on Monday

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

WALLIES and OLES:

  1. all h

Eavan Boland

     

 

Wally (and Carina) meet Eavan Boland

 

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. vs. Lit. Analysis paper on 2 summer novels:  Due date on Monday, March 8 Click HERE for the Lit. Analysis paper packet.  Click HERE for the grading sheet.

    FYI:  ORDER TO TURN IN THE LIT. ANALYSIS PAPER:

    • grading sheet filled out (student parts only! Do not grade yourself!)

    • outline

    • paper

    • works cited

    • photocopy of the title page and back side of title page of each novel

    • highlighted copies of each doc. check--one per novel--in different colors

    • SECURITY copy--turn in (but not in folder with your paper) or e-mailed to Wally by midnight the day the paper is due!

  2. ASSIGNMENT  FINISH OJ #8 INTRO TO LIT. THEORY  Do part 4:  

 Part 4 (min. 1 side) Marginalia, Singing, & Shooting :  ( a minimum of one side--DUE MONDAY, MARCH 8th)!   YOU WILL DO THIS 4TH PART OVER THE WEEKEND!  Read the two green articles about active reading--Moore's "How to Read" and Rosenblatt's "Life in the Margins"--which are in the lit. theory packet.  Also, read Billy Collins' poem "Marginalia."  In your OJ, jot down what you thought of these selections. 

Now read the two stories.  Actively read the first one "Singing Lesson" but do not write on the actual story (we need these back).  Instead, either put a sheet of paper alongside the story to make a "margin" for comments or if you would like to print a copy of "The Singing Lesson" to do your ACTIVE READING, click here:   http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/SingLess.shtml            FYI! (especially if you've been assigned Marxism, Feminist/Gender Criticism,  New Historicism, or Psychoanalytic theory:  Here is some biographical information on Katharine Mansfield:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katherine_Mansfield  or  http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/kmansfi.htm        If you would like to print a copy of "Shooting an Elephant," click here: http://www.online-literature.com/orwell/887/   Remember to NOT actively read this story (if you can stand it!).  For some biographical information on Orwell, click here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Orwell

After you have read "Shooting an Elephant" and "Singing Lesson," write up a reaction to the active reading articles, a reaction to the two stories, and then choose one of the two stories and analyze the story through the lens of your assigned theorist.  This is your final part of this journal.  It must be a minimum of 1 side of a page.
 

WALLIES ONLY:

HEADS UP!  Got HamletYou need a copy of the Signet Classic Hamlet by Monday!!  It MUST be the Signet Classic.  They are available in the school store for $3.50.  Here's what it looks like: 

 

  1. INTRO: SLAM POETRY--WHAT IS SLAM POETRY?--Show  Taylor Mali's poems/video "Conviction" or "Totally Like" or play Taylor Mali "Proofreading" poem or show video from Bowery Club or Taylor Mali's poems/video  "Teachers" and Bassey Ipki's "Silence" and Rat Sack "I'm Losing You"

    MORE SLAM POETRY?--Show  9 min.  video from Bowery Club ("Forgetfulness" & "Introduction" and "Proofreading" or Bassey Ipki's "Homeward"or Rat Sack "I'm Losing You" or Poetry "Krispy Kreme" or Alicia Keyes on youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLk_Q3Cq2Ns

    Bassey Ikpi's  "Homeward"  

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTcOWR3uc0E&feature=related

    Diallo  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tj4C8riMsKI

    Apology to My Unborn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzyrHsYTveE&feature=related

    OR  Alicia Keys "POW" and discuss TONE and what support there is for her tone interpretation (DIDLS) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLk_Q3Cq2Ns  

    Steve Coleman "I want this poem"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3bbpj2hX6w&feature=related

    Eric Darby Scratch & Dent Dreams

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfTa4B7wQ_8

    Oscar Brown, Jr. "This Beach"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRFb-D1gYY0&feature=related

    Favorite Poem project   Musee"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlbFQ5ZtjVY&feature=related

    Auden himself reading "Musee"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZqftCZD2NI

    Slave to Beauty  (inspired by "Musee")

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tT6p1vkq5h4&feature=related

    Four Weddings and a Funeral  Auden's "Stop All the Clocks"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_a-eXIoyYA&feature=related

    another "Stop All the Clocks" with film clips

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1O4LGBxEeA&feature=related

 

BILLY COLLINS WEBSITES:

http://www.bigsnap.com/billy.html (former poet laureate Billy Collins site)    

 www.loc.gov/poetry/180  

http://www.powells.com/authors/collins.html

“Three Poems by Billy Collins”—“The Lanyard” and “ The Future” and “Building with its Face Blown Off”  at Apsen Ideas Festival:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LEO1e4euUTc&feature=related

“Consolation” Billy Collins

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uXx5K6gfQBw&feature=related

Aspen Ideas Festival “An Evening with Billy Collins”

http://www.aifestival.org/index2.php?menu=3&sub=1&title=222&action=full_info

“Litany” Billy Collins

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56Iq3PbSWZY&NR=1

“Forgetfulness”  Billy Collins

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrEPJh14mcU

TAYLOR MALI SITES

To hear/see Taylor perform some of his poems (including at the Bowery in 2005), look at the youtube links below:

Interview of Taylor Mali:  What is “slam poetry”?  “Undivided Attention” poem

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vpDE9tkgF4&feature=related

”The Miracle Workers”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9vMHSGmGtuo&feature=related

“What Teachers Make” Bowery Poetry Club

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xuFnP5N2uA&feature=related

“What Teachers Make” Def Poetry Jam

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpog1_NFd2Q&feature=related

“Like Lilly Like Wilson”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tshNfYWPlDg&NR=1

“On Girls Lending Pens”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44sXwJgqUyc&feature=related

“I Could Be a Poet”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mnOrrknTxbI&feature=related

“Totally like whatever, you know?”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qv0aDhqxiHg&feature=related

“Labeling Keys”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SbnQfFaxkno&feature=related

“Reading Aloud”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1rZzwIb6aPE&feature=related

“Undivided Attention”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1MHVqAWGmI&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=00JtwMKMOMQ&feature=related

“Where’s Your Favorite Place to Write?”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_POEIhEXRI&feature=related

“Don’t Wait For Me” podcast

http://web.mac.com/tmali/Photo_site/Podcasts/Entries/2007/10/3_Work_in_progress.html

“The Apologia Of Hephaestus, 2007”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JZW9HEer3o&feature=related

"What Teachers Make" on DPJ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAVK2Agtr10&feature=related

"Conviction" on DPJ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCNIBV87wV4&feature=related

 parody of Taylor's "Conviction"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xp7Nh_Z99yY&feature=related

Billy Collins and Taylor Mali

There is a podcast link on this page that you can use to actually hear excerpts from the night of "Page Meets Stage" with Billy Collins and Taylor Mali reading their poetry! It's podcast #1.  Check it out! (maybe you can hear Wally's annoying laugh, too!)

 

Fun stuff about Dead Poets Society:

some DPS trivia:

  • Director Peter Weir chose to shoot the film in chronological order to better capture the development of the relationships between the boys and their growing respect for Mr. Keating.
     
  • Filmed at St. Andrews, a private boarding school in Delaware.
  • Loosely based on the experiences of private school students with Samuel Pickering, who is currently a Professor of English at the University of Connecticut.

    Liam Neeson had originally landed the leading role to be directed by Jeff Kanew, but lost it to Robin Williams when director Peter Weir came on board

    for more DPS trivia: http://imdb.com/title/tt0097165/trivia

    some DPS goofs:

    • Factual errors: The line that Keating refers to from Whitman's poem "Song of Myself" is misquoted. The line actually reads "I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world".
       
    • Audio/visual unsynchronized: After Keating instructs the boys to rip out the introduction to their poetry textbook, his lip movements do not match the speech.
    • Anachronisms: Although the setting is the 1950s, the chemistry textbook the students use, "Chemistry: A Modern Course" by Robert Smoot, is copyrighted 1987.
       
    • Anachronisms: The literature anthology, "Literature: Reading, Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and the Essay", edited by Robert DiYanni, was published by Random House in 1986.

    some DPS quotes:

"We don't read and write poetry because it's cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for. To quote from Whitman, "O me! O life!... of the questions of these recurring; of the endless trains of the faithless... of cities filled with the foolish; what good amid these, O me, O life?" Answer. That you are here - that life exists, and identity; that the powerful play goes on and you may contribute a verse. That the powerful play *goes on* and you may contribute a verse. What will your verse be?"

They're not that different from you, are they? Same haircuts. Full of hormones, just like you. Invincible, just like you feel. The world is their oyster. They believe they're destined for great things, just like many of you, their eyes are full of hope, just like you. Did they wait until it was too late to make from their lives even one iota of what they were capable? Because, you see gentlemen, these boys are now fertilizing daffodils. But if you listen real close, you can hear them whisper their legacy to you. Go on, lean in. Listen, you hear it? - - Carpe - - hear it? - - Carpe, carpe diem, seize the day boys, make your lives extraordinary.

SLAM POETRY SITES!!!!!

http://www.louderarts.com/faq/  (slam poetry site)

 AND  http://www.defpoetryjam.com/

AND http://www.hbo.com/defpoetry/

AND http://aalbc.com/authors/def_poetry_jam_story.htm

AND http://www.defpoetryjamontour.com/

AND  www.poetryslam.com

      National "slammer"champ

Taylor Mali

 AND www.taylormali.com   (Taylor Mali's site!  You can actually hear him recite his poetry.  He's won the nat'l slam poetry championship more than anyone!)

Hey, all you teacher wannabes, to look at Taylor's website outlining his dream to convince 1,000 people to become teachers (because of his inspiration):

http://web.mac.com/tmali/iWeb/1,000%20New%20Teachers/The%20Mission.html

For a parody on Mali's poem "What Teachers Make," click HERE!

Bassey Ikpi

  www.basseyworld.com/main.php   (Bassey Ikpi's site)

 

To watch Bassey "perform" her awesome poem "Homeward"

on Def Poetry, click on the link below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTcOWR3uc0E&mode=related&search=

To watch Urgelt "perform" Robert Service's chillin' poem "The Cremation of Sam McGee"

on youtube, click on the link below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6lBkuz1TlVc&mode=related&search=

For a commentary on Urgelt's reading of this poem, click on the link below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGjkd2y-vBk

Bassey Ikpi's  "Homeward"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTcOWR3uc0E&feature=related

Diallo  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tj4C8riMsKI

Apology to My Unborn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzyrHsYTveE&feature=related

OR  Alicia Keys "POW" and discuss TONE and what support there is for her tone interpretation (DIDLS) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLk_Q3Cq2Ns  

Poetri--"Money"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZENZnjk7Vfw

Krispy Kreme

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ht9lB-hebJw&feature=relate

Steve Coleman "I want this poem"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3bbpj2hX6w&feature=related

Eric Darby Scratch & Dent Dreams

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfTa4B7wQ_8

Oscar Brown, Jr. "This Beach"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRFb-D1gYY0&feature=related

  

TAYLOR MALI, the most times national champ and master of the slam

      

For some additional cool websites Wally found online to enhance your experience with Poetry, click HERE! These include audio files of Billy Collins reading his poetry,  etc. etc. etc, and an MPR interview with former U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Haas (who discusses about 10 min. into the interview the OJ 1 Kennedy quote about "when power corrupts, literature cleanses").  He also talks about performance poetry vs. the private voice to the quiet of the mind (which he thinks his poetry is best suited to). He says that poetry can live in both places. He admires Gary Snyder as a mentor.  Website to hear this interview of Feb. 15, 2005 is: http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2006/02/15/midmorning2/

  1. SLAM POETRY SITES!

    http://www.louderarts.com/faq/  (slam poetry site)

     AND  http://www.defpoetryjam.com/

    AND http://www.hbo.com/defpoetry/

    AND http://aalbc.com/authors/def_poetry_jam_story.htm

    AND http://www.defpoetryjamontour.com/

    AND  www.poetryslam.com

    more DEF POETRY

    Alicia Keyes Def Poetry performance of "POW" on youtube

     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLk_Q3Cq2Ns

    Suheir Hammad (slam poet)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fhWX2F6G7Y

    Al Letson (slam poet)

  1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2OukbrA3v4A&mode=related&search=

      AND www.taylormali.com   (Taylor Mali's site!  You can actually hear him recite his poetry.  He's won the nat'l slam poetry championship more than anyone!)

                 

     

    link about Taylor's goal of personally convincing 1,000 people to become teachers:

    http://web.mac.com/tmali/iWeb/1,000%20New%20Teachers/The%20Mission.html

     

    AND

     http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2006/02/15/midmorning2/

    Andrew and Andrew read Jim Morrison at our EPHS 2005 Poetry Slam (we'll have one this spring, too!)

     

  1.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet Irish Poet and Stanford University English Professor Eavan Boland

Carina (age 10!), Wally, and Eavan Boland

Today's Words of the Day:

chiasmus (Oles)

chattel (Oles)

inane (Wallies)

laconic (Wallies)

 

The Great Gatsby

  

 

 

Today's Quotes of the Day:

People do not wish to appear foolish; to avoid the appearance of foolishness, they are willing to remain actually fools. ---Alice Walker, writer (1944- )

and

Kindness is more important than wisdom, and the recognition of this is the beginning of wisdom. --Theodore Rubin, psychiatrist and writer (1923- )