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Click  HERE for the CLASS OF 2011 PHOTO GALLERY.

Click the following website for the WEB ALBUM GALLERY:

https://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011APLitClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIre876Uxtrs2wE#

 

"Franklin's Prologue" and Franklin's Tale"

 

 

WEEK 16a May 23-27, 2011

GOODBYE, CHAUCER,

PARTNER POEMS!!!!

and

  Arcadia

Arcadia is an actual region of Greece, a series of valleys surrounded by high mountains and therefore difficult of access. In very ancient times, the people of Arcadia were known to be rather primitive herdsmen of sheep, goats and bovines, rustic folk who led an unsophisticated yet happy life in the natural fertility of their valleys and foothills. Soon, however, their down-to-earth culture came to be closely associated with their traditional singing and pipe playing, an activity they used to pass the time as they herded their animals. Their native god was Pan, the inventor of the Pan pipes (seven reeds of unequal length held together by wax and string). The simple, readily accessible and moving music Pan and the Arcadian shepherds originated soon gained a wide appreciation all over the Greek world. This pastoral (in Latin "pastor" = shepherd) music began to inspire highly educated poets, who developed verses in which shepherds exchanged songs in a beautiful natural setting preserved pristine from any incursions from a dangerous "outside."

In the seventeenth century, the French painter Nicolas Poussin (1594-1665) used this pictorial tradition to paint one of his most famous canvasses, known as "The Arcadian shepherds" or as "ET IN ARCADIA EGO" (1647). This painting represents four Arcadians, in a meditative and melancholy mood, symmetrically arranged on either side of a tomb. One of the shepherds kneels on the ground and reads the inscription on the tomb: ET IN ARCADIA EGO, which can be translated either as "And I [= death] too (am) in Arcadia" or as "I [= the person in the tomb] also used to live in Arcadia." The second shepherd seems to discuss the inscription with a lovely girl standing near him. The third shepherd stands pensively aside. From Poussin's painting, Arcadia now takes on the tinges of a melancholic contemplation about death itself, about the fact that our happiness in this world is very transitory and evanescent. Even when we feel that we have discovered a place where peace and gentle joy reign, we must remember that it will end, and that all will vanish.

Plautus' grandpa  ???

Click HERE for some Arcadia pictures and websites!

 

Is it Plautus or is it Lightning?

CONGRATS, Mr. OLSON! 

ARCADIA HERE HE COMES!

 

"ET IN ARCADIA EGO"

"We shed as we pick up, like travelers who must carry everything in their arms, and what we let fall will be picked up by those behind.  The procession is very long and life is very short.  We die on the march.  But there is nothing outside the march so nothing can be lost to it."

--Tom Stoppard (Septimus, Arcadia, p. 38)

 

CT paper (remember NO BUYBACKS!!!)

DUE WEDNESDAY, June 1st (technical aspects graded by avg. errors per page!)

Read the purple packet outlining the CT paper  For a copy of this packet, click HERE.To see a copy of the packet and/or print off the grading sheet, click HERE.  Click HERE for a copy of brainstormed IDEAS FOR MEETING PLACES.

and

WARNING!!! ALL JOURNALS DUE Friday, June 3rd! How are your journals coming?  You will turn in the WHOLE batch on  FRIDAY!  For a current (and FINAL!) master list of journals WITH LINKS TO THE DOCUMENTS EACH JOURNAL IS BASED ON, click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals Print out this list to turn in with all your WA's (to Wally) and OJ's (to Olson).  Be sure to pre-score your journals tranferring any scores on the journals already onto the grading sheet. Note that there are questions to answer (worth 5 points) on your journaling experience!  Put each set of journals in its own folder, please!  

CLICK HERE WA 2011 FOR THE BEST PRINTABLE PDF FORM OF THE WA's OR FOR THE WORD DOCUMENT WA LIST, click HERE WA WORD 2011

CLICK HERE OJ 2011 FOR THE BEST PRINTABLE PDF FORM OF THE OJ's OR HERE OJ WORD 2011.

 

and

MEETING OF THE MINDS PREP

Meeting 2 Friday, May 27th

Click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  

Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals.

Click HERE to go automatically to the yellow HW packet!

Click HERE for another copy of the 4 week pink calendar.

To print more allusion and vocab sheets, click HERE!

EPHS ENGLISH DEPARTMENT SURVIVAL MANUAL  (rev. 11.22.09)

To print off the entire manual half size or full size or to use the manual online in "navigational mode," go to the EPHS English department home page and click on the buttons to the left of the screen:

http://ephs.edenpr.org/index.php?option=com_qcontacts&view=category&catid=76&Itemid=123

click HERE for the COVER with table of contents  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the GRS (Grammar Rules Summary) section--yellow

click HERE for the MSF (Manuscript Formatting Rules) section--yellow

click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) SHORT FORM--pink

Buybacks!  If  buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  Read the blue BUYBACK section of the Survival Packet CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure.   For a copy of this blue section, click HERE  If you would like to use a template to do your buybacks, click HERE. (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE.    For a STUDENT'S SAMPLE (not perfect, but close!) of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (pdf.verson) or  HERE (WORD) version.

Bet you couldn't wait!  Click right HERE or at the Purdue OWL website (great resource!) to see next year's MLA Rule Changes:

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/557/01/

  • Buybacks 

    Notes: 1.  Record your results on the yellow and pink sheets in your folder.   By the way, Mr. Olson doesn't like to use the boxes at the end of the grading sheet.  He prefers that you read his comments in the margins to find the positives and suggestions.  You must summarize these in the pink boxes and write a goal for the next paper.  Then, record your number of errors in Lit. Analysis Paper column on the yellow technical sheet.) 2.   Be sure to follow directions! There will be a lot less "mercy" for not doing correcting the error correctly this time.   3.  YOU ARE REQUIRED TO WRITE OUT THE WHOLE SENTENCE THAT HAS THE ERROR(S).  DO NOT USE ELLIPSES!  4.  Make sure you do not make ANY NEW ERRORS.  If two or more errors occur in the same sentence, follow the specific directions on how to correct them all together.  5.   TURN BUYBACKS IN ON TIME!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  5.  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE. (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample (NOT PERFECT) of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

    NOTE!  You may organize your buybacks by type of error or chronologically as they appear in your paper

 

 

Welcome sweet spring . . . or as Chaucer would say,

 "Whan that Aprille with his shoures soote / The droghte of March hath perced to the roote, / And bathed every veyne in swich licour / Of which vertu engendred is the flour;"

 

 
DATE In-Class plan Homework (due next day almost always):

Monday, May 23, 2011 day 73

Today's Quote of the Day:

"If you associate enough with older people who do enjoy their lives, who are not stored away in any golden ghettos, you will gain a sense of continuity and of the possibility for a full life." -Tom Stoppard

Today's Allusion:

sour grapes

Words of the Day:

zouch

An ungenteel man; a bookseller   --John Awdelay’s The Fraternitye of Vagabondes, 1561

niggle

Small, fine, or cramped handwriting; a scribble, a scrawl.  --Edward Lloyd’s Encyclopaedic Dictionary, 1895

feduciary

primordia

 

Monday, May 23, 2011 day 73
 

  1. BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

    1. Group check-in:
    • Weekend highs and lows
    •  
    1. Finish "WIFE OF BATH'S PROLOGUE & TALE" & "Nun's Priest's Tale"-- Universal Questions

     

 
Monday, May 23, 2011 day 73

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

 

  1. ASSIGNMENT C9: WA 24 Partner Poem--due Wednesday May 25th!  Be ready for you (and your partner--if you want one or two, but no more than a trio) to "perform it." Click HERE if you need a copy of the three poems.

  2. OJ 21: RESPONSE TO "The Canon's Yeoman's Tale"

    1.    Read "The Canon's Yeoman's Tale" Prologue" (pp. 312-315) and "The Canon's Yeoman's Tale" (pp. 315-330.)

    2.  Why do you suppose Chaucer had these two characters join the pilgrimage after it had started?  What does this tale reveal about medieval life?  Discuss the universal questions that arise in this tale.  How does the theme of this tale connect with the others we have read?

    3.  After reading, click HERE and take a look at the Canterbury Puzzles--a vintage book from 1907 filled with LOGIC PUZZLES inspired by Canterbury Tales.  Jot down a set of FIG questions for this prologue and/or tale.  Also, jot down what you think is revealed about medieval society and culture in this tale. (There may be a quiz!)  

    FOR FUN!  AREN'T YOU GLAD YOU'RE THE CLASS OF '08?  Because you are NOT the class of '08, you get out of doing "A TYPICAL AP ESSAY ON 2 TALES!"  You would have had 40 minutes (including planning time) to do the following AP essay.  It would be graded on the 9 point scale and given a holistic letter grade which will be assigned points (25 possible) and recorded under the test category.

    HERE IT WAS:

    "But every thyng which schyneth as the gold,/Nis nat gold, as that I have herd it told."

    The Canterbury Tales (preamble, l. 17,362), "The Canon's Yeoman's Tale"

    As the above passage indicates, one theme present in The Canterbury Tales is the conflict between appearance and reality. Write a well-organized essay in which you examine Chaucer's exploration of this theme in "The Knight's Tale" and one other tale from The Canterbury Tales.

     

  3. Arcadia Read the entire play--due WEDNESDAY, MAY 25th!   IF you like, buy a copy in the school store ($12.00). Do OJ 22 Notes on the First Read-Through and INITIAL REACTION (questions, comments, maybe some F.I.G. questions, initial confusions, and What do you "get" upon your initial reading of Arcadia? etc.  etc.  etc.)

     View our AP EPHS info. page on Stoppard's R&G and Arcadia, click here:

     
     

    (Let Mr. O know if the link doesn't work!)

  4. Mof M  WORK:  --Work on your part in our final AP Lit. Project called Meeting of the Minds! Better yet--CLICK HERE to print out the sheet outlining the project.  The first organizational group meeting  was last week.  The second group meeting is Friday! The script should be in rough draft form and lots of individual brainstorming on the theme done.
  5. Buybacks for POSITION PAPER

    Notes: 1.  Record your results on the yellow and pink sheets in your folder.   By the way, Mr. Olson doesn't like to use the boxes at the end of the grading sheet.  He prefers that you read his comments in the margins to find the positives and suggestions.  You must summarize these in the pink boxes and write a goal for the next paper.  Then, record your number of errors in Lit. Analysis Paper column on the yellow technical sheet.) 2.   Be sure to follow directions! There will be a lot less "mercy" for not doing correcting the error correctly this time.   3.  YOU ARE REQUIRED TO WRITE OUT THE WHOLE SENTENCE THAT HAS THE ERROR(S).  DO NOT USE ELLIPSES!  4.  Make sure you do not make ANY NEW ERRORS.  If two or more errors occur in the same sentence, follow the specific directions on how to correct them all together.  5.   TURN BUYBACKS IN ON TIME!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  5.  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE. (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample (NOT PERFECT) of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

    NOTE!  You may organize your buybacks by type of error or chronologically as they appear in your paper

  6. Hear ye!  Hear ye! ALL-CALL FOR HAND-OUTS and BOOKS (Stack all of them up with a post-it on top with your name on it. Give us all of those signed out to you.  Do NOT give us the books one at a time!  We need them back or NO diploma!)  "Gather ye hand-outs while ye may; Old time is still a flyin'!  For all books and hand-outs not turned in, Wally and Olson will be a cryin'!  :(

     

  7. WARNING!!! ALL JOURNALS DUE WEEK ON NEXT FriDAY, June 3rd! How are your journals coming?  You will turn in the WHOLE batch on  FRIDAY!  For a current (and FINAL!) master list of journals WITH LINKS TO THE DOCUMENTS EACH JOURNAL IS BASED ON, click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals Print out this list to turn in with all your WA's (to Wally) and OJ's (to Olson).  Be sure to pre-score your journals tranferring any scores on the journals already onto the grading sheet. Note that there are questions to answer (worth 5 points) on your journaling experience!  Put each set of journals in its own folder, please!

 

Why not read some other Canterbury Tales if you get a chance?  Here are some ideas:

"Physician's Prologue" and "Physician's Tale"

AND

"Cleric's Prologue" and "Cleric's Tale"

 

 

 

 

TUESDAY, May 24, 2011

Today's Allusion:

so

Today's Words of the Day:

jocose

inundate

celibataire:  bachelor

--T. Lewis Davie’s Supplemental English Glossary, 1881

fribbler  A trifler; one who professes rapture for a woman yet dreads her consent.

--Samuel Johnson’s Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

Click HERE for a copy of more fun FORGOTTEN ENGLISH Words of the Day!

 

"The Canon's Yeoman's  Prologue" and "The Canon's Yeoman's Tale" 

Canon's Yeoman page from the Ellesmere Manuscript

Why not read some other Canterbury Tales

when you get a chance? 

Here are some ideas:

"Manciple's Prologue" and "Manciple's Tale"

  AND

"Merchant's Prologue" and "Merchant's Tale"

"Physician's Prologue" and "Physician's Tale"

AND

"Cleric's Prologue" and "Cleric's Tale"

 

!

Today's Quote of the Day:

"If you associate enough with older people who do enjoy their lives, who are not stored away in any golden ghettos, you will gain a sense of continuity and of the possibility for a full life." -Tom Stoppard

Today's Allusion:

sold down the river

Words of the Day:

 

Words of the Day:

contumely -- rudeness, contemptuousness, reproach

William Grimshaw’s Ladies’ Lexicon and Parlour Companion, 1854

pulveration 

A beating into powder.

   --Henry Cockeram’s Interpreter of Hard English Words,  1623

Adaptation of Latin pulveration-em, noun of action formed on pulverare

[the pulverization of something].

   --Sir James Murray’s New English Dictionary, 1909

 

Click HERE for a copy of more fun FORGOTTEN ENGLISH Words of the Day!

feduciary

primordia

 

 

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. Group check-in:
  • Weekend highs and lows
  •  
  1. "Pardoner's Tale"--Discuss "The Pardoner's Tale"--tale suits the teller, what does Chaucer seem to be saying about hypocrisy and the inability to "walk the walk"? the 7 deadly sins
  2. "Canon's Yeoman's Tale"
  3. "Physician's Prologue and Tale" or  "Cleric's Prologue and Tale"  Rolf and Wally's--death before dishonor modern examples, abuse of power & positions (principles vs. personalities), Virginia's abstinence, Virginius' choices, portrayal of gender  Rolf and Wally's Final Thoughts

 

  1. HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. HAND-OUTS and BOOKS!
  2. OJ 21 Canon's Yeoman's Tale
  3. WA 24 Partner Poem if done

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. ASSIGNMENT C9: WA 24 Partner Poem--due Wednesday May 25th!  Be ready for you (and your partner--if you want one or two, but no more than a trio) to "perform it." Click HERE if you need a copy of the three poems.

  2. Arcadia Read the entire play--due tomorrow!   IF you like, buy a copy in the school store ($12.00). Do OJ 22 Notes on the First Read-Through and INITIAL REACTION (questions, comments, maybe some F.I.G. questions, initial confusions, and What do you "get" upon your initial reading of Arcadia? etc.  etc.  etc.)

     View our AP EPHS info. page on Stoppard's R&G and Arcadia, click here:

     
     

    (Let Mr. O know if the link doesn't work!)

  3. Mof M  WORK:  --Work on your part in our final AP Lit. Project called Meeting of the Minds! Better yet--CLICK HERE to print out the sheet outlining the project.  The first organizational group meeting  was last week.  The second group meeting is Friday! The script should be in rough draft form and lots of individual brainstorming on the theme done.
  4. Start working on the CT paper (remember NO BUYBACKS!!!) (technical aspects graded by avg. errors per page!) Read the purple packet outlining the CT paper  For a copy of this packet, click HERE.  It's due Wednesday, June 1. To see a copy of the packet and/or print off the grading sheet, click HERE.  Click HERE for a copy of brainstormed IDEAS FOR MEETING PLACES.

  5. Hear ye!  Hear ye! ALL-CALL FOR HAND-OUTS and BOOKS (Stack all of them up with a post-it on top with your name on it. Give us all of those signed out to you.  Do NOT give us the books one at a time!  We need them back or NO diploma!)  "Gather ye hand-outs while ye may; Old time is still a flyin'!  For all books and hand-outs not turned in, Wally and Olson will be a cryin'!  :(

     

  6. WARNING!!! ALL JOURNALS DUE Friday, June 3rd.  How are your journals coming?  You will turn in the WHOLE batch on  FRIDAY!  For a current (and FINAL!) master list of journals WITH LINKS TO THE DOCUMENTS EACH JOURNAL IS BASED ON, click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals Print out this list to turn in with all your WA's (to Wally) and OJ's (to Olson).  Be sure to pre-score your journals tranferring any scores on the journals already onto the grading sheet. Note that there are questions to answer (worth 5 points) on your journaling experience!  Put each set of journals in its own folder, please!  

Why not read some other Canterbury Tales if you get a chance?  Here are some ideas:

"Physician's Prologue" and "Physician's Tale"

AND

"Cleric's Prologue" and "Cleric's Tale"

 

 

 

WEDNESDAY, day 79

GOODBYE, CHAUCER!

and

PARTNER POEMS!!!

"ET IN ARCADIA EGO"

ARCADIA

        

    

 

 

 

 

 

Today's Allusion:

sold down the river

Today's Quote of the Day:

"It is a defect of God's humour that he directs our hearts everywhere but to those who have a right to them" 

--Tom Stoppard (Lady Croom, Arcadia, p. 71)

"It's WANTING to know that makes us matter"

--Tom Stoppard (Hannah, Arcadia, p. 75)

 

 FORGOTTEN ENGLISH Words of the Day!

celibataire:  bachelor

--T. Lewis Davie’s Supplemental English Glossary, 1881

fribbler  A trifler; one who professes rapture for a woman yet dreads her consent.

--Samuel Johnson’s Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

antiquarium  -- A repository of antiquities.   --Sir James Murray’s New English Dictionary, 1888

exlex--an outlaw; Latin ex, ot, away, and lex¸law  --Robert Hunter’s Encyclopaedic Dictionary, 1894

doattee--To nod the head when sleep comes on whilst one is sitting up.  This action is…to be noticed in church.    --Frederick Elworthy’s Specimens of English Dialects, 1778

 

Click HERE for a copy of more fun FORGOTTEN ENGLISH Words of the Day!

 

 

 

Group check-in:
  • Share fav. Canterbury Tale and which tale wins the contest?
  1. Share  Partner Poems
  2. Share fav. Canterbury Tale and which tale wins the contest?
  3. FINAL THOUGHTS ON CHAUCER--what did you think of it? Ellesmere manuscript article and "Take the Chaucer" article Play "Canterbury Tales" by the Spiznicks
  4.  
  5. Arcadia intro

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. OJ 23 Arcadia scene 1

  2. WA 23 Partner poem

  3. HAND-OUTS and BOOKS!

  4. LOTS OF ARTICLES:  Lit Theory and all Hist of English Language articles, Beowulf texts (if done) and hand-outs and all Hist of Eng Lang. articles (blue and green) as well as modern English language articles (yellow and ivory). "Unlearning the Myth" articles. Names articles

    Plautus' grandpa  ???

  1. Response to PR #4

  2. Arcadia  Re-read scene 1!  Then do OJ 23 ARCADIA SCENE 1 (2 sides minimum): reaction to scene 1  (2 sides) (one side min.)  and  web research a topic of your choice related to scene 1  (one side min.)  

     View our AP EPHS info. page on Stoppard's R&G and Arcadia, click here:

     
     

    (Let Mr. O know if the link doesn't work!)

  3. Work on the CT paper (remember NO BUYBACKS!!!) (technical aspects graded by avg. errors per page!) Read the purple packet outlining the CT paper  For a copy of this packet, click HERE.  It's due Wednesday, June 1. To see a copy of the packet and/or print off the grading sheet, click HERE.  Click HERE for a copy of brainstormed IDEAS FOR MEETING PLACES.

     

  4. Hear ye!  Hear ye! ALL-CALL FOR HAND-OUTS and BOOKS (Stack all of them up with a post-it on top with your name on it. Give us all of those signed out to you.  Do NOT give us the books one at a time!  We need them back or NO diploma!)  "Gather ye hand-outs while ye may; Old time is still a flyin'!  For all books and hand-outs not turned in, Wally and Olson will be a cryin'!  :(

     

  5. WARNING!!! ALL JOURNALS DUE Friday, June 3rd.  How are your journals coming?  You will turn in the WHOLE batch on  FRIDAY!  For a current (and FINAL!) master list of journals WITH LINKS TO THE DOCUMENTS EACH JOURNAL IS BASED ON, click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals Print out this list to turn in with all your WA's (to Wally) and OJ's (to Olson).  Be sure to pre-score your journals tranferring any scores on the journals already onto the grading sheet. Note that there are questions to answer (worth 5 points) on your journaling experience!  Put each set of journals in its own folder, please!  

    CLICK HERE WA 2011 FOR THE BEST PRINTABLE PDF FORM OF THE WA's OR FOR THE WORD DOCUMENT WA LIST, click HERE WA WORD 2011

    CLICK HERE OJ 2011 FOR THE BEST PRINTABLE PDF FORM OF THE OJ's OR HERE OJ WORD 2011.

  6. Mof M  WORK:  --Work on your part in our final AP Lit. Project called Meeting of the Minds! Better yet--CLICK HERE to print out the sheet outlining the project.  The first organizational group meeting  was last week.  The second group meeting is Friday! The script should be in rough draft form and lots of individual brainstorming on the theme done.

  7. ALL-CALL FOR HAND-OUTS and BOOKS!  We need them back!  "Gather ye hand-outs while ye may; Old time is still a flyin'!  For all books and hand-outs not turned in, Wally and Olson will be a cryin'!  :(   Remember especially to bring back the Poetry Packet, Frankenstein Packet, Hamlet packets, Beowulf Packets--all that Jazz!

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THURSDAY, day 80

FRACTALS!

Check out this website to help you make FRACTALS:

http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Hangar/7959/fractalapplet.html

 

Plautus enjoys The Couch of Eros

 

Today's Quote of the Day:

"A man who makes trouble for others is also making trouble for himself."

-- Chinua Achebe

Today's Allusion:

pyrrhic victory

FORGOTTEN ENGLISH

WORDS of the DAY:

green gown  The supposed badge of the loss of virginity.  -John Jamieson’s Etymological Scottish Dictionary, 1808

A tousle in the new-mown hay…beyond the bounds of innocent play. -Ebenezer Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1898

To give a lass a green gown:  to throw her down upon the grass so that the gown was stained.  --Walter Skeat’s Glossary of Tudor and Stuart Word, 1914

anabrochismus--operation for removing the eyelashes…by means of a hair knotted around them.  ---Dr. Robley Dunglison’s Dictionary of Medical Science, 1844.

unspoken water--Water from under a bridge over which the living pass and the dead are carried, brought in the dawn or twilight to  the house of a sick person, without the bearer’s speaking either in going or returning; used in various ways as a most powerful charm by the superstitious for healing the sick.  --Alexander Warrack’s Scots Dialectic Dictionary, 1911

widow’s piano--inferior instruments sold as bargains, so called from the ordinary advertisement announcing that a widow lady is compelled to sell her piano, for which she will take half price.  -Ebenezer Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1898

Click HERE for a copy of more fun

 FORGOTTEN ENGLISH Words of the Day!

brio

skullduggery

 

Group check-in:
  • Check-in that everyone is ready for  Meeting of the Minds meeting 2 tomorrow.  Look over agenda
  1. Share fav. Canterbury Tale and which tale wins the contest?
  2. FINAL THOUGHTS ON CHAUCER--what did you think of it? Ellesmere manuscript article and "Take the Chaucer" article Play "Canterbury Tales" by the Spiznicks
  3.  

  4. Arcadia

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. OJ 23 Arcadia scenes 2-3 and notes on outside articles

  2. HAND-OUTS and BOOKS!

 
  1. Fantastic Healthy Food Friday!
  2. Arcadia  re-read scenes 2-3.  Then do OJ 24: Reaction to scenes 2-3 (one side min.) and "Notes and Observations" on the education of women, Arcadia as a concept, and Sir Philip Sidney's style.  Read LBT page 202-207 about Sir Philip Sidney with a couple of his sonnets.  If you don't have your LBT book any more, click HERE for these pages!  Visit the following site on Sir Philip Sidney plus any of the others you might find interesting: <http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/sidbib.htm>  etc.

     View our AP EPHS info. page on Stoppard's R&G and Arcadia, click here:

     
     

    (Let Mr. O know if the link doesn't work!)

  3. Mof M  WORK:  --Work on your part in our final AP Lit. Project called Meeting of the Minds! Better yet--CLICK HERE to print out the sheet outlining the project.  The first organizational group meeting  was last week.  The second group meeting is Friday! The script should be in rough draft form and lots of individual brainstorming on the theme done.

  4. WARNING!!! ALL JOURNALS DUE FriDAY, June 3rd How are your journals coming?  You will turn in the WHOLE batch on  FRIDAY!  For a current (and FINAL!) master list of journals WITH LINKS TO THE DOCUMENTS EACH JOURNAL IS BASED ON, click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals Print out this list to turn in with all your WA's (to Wally) and OJ's (to Olson).  Be sure to pre-score your journals tranferring any scores on the journals already onto the grading sheet. Note that there are questions to answer (worth 5 points) on your journaling experience!  Put each set of journals in its own folder, please!  

    CLICK HERE WA 2011 FOR THE BEST PRINTABLE PDF FORM OF THE WA's OR FOR THE WORD DOCUMENT WA LIST, click HERE WA WORD 2011

    CLICK HERE OJ 2011 FOR THE BEST PRINTABLE PDF FORM OF THE OJ's OR HERE OJ WORD 2011.

  5. Work on the CT paper (remember NO BUYBACKS!!!) (technical aspects graded by avg. errors per page!) Read the purple packet outlining the CT paper  For a copy of this packet, click HERE.  It's due Wednesday, June 1. To see a copy of the packet and/or print off the grading sheet, click HERE.  Click HERE for a copy of brainstormed IDEAS FOR MEETING PLACES.

     

  6. ALL-CALL FOR HAND-OUTS and BOOKS!  We need them back!  BRING YOUR SURVIVAL PACKET, too!!!!"Gather ye hand-outs while ye may; Old time is still a flyin'!  For all books and hand-outs not turned in, Wally and Olson will be a cryin'!  :(

 

FRIDAY, May 27, 2011, day 77

MEETING OF THE MINDS--MEETING #2

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Today's Quote of the Day:

"You are a human BEING, and not a HUMAN WAS or WILL BE"

Today's Allusion:

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FORGOTTEN ENGLISH  

Words of the Day:

 

fangast--marriageable maid.  Norfolk.

--Francis Grose’s Provincial Glossary, 1811

stues--those places which were permitted in England to women of professed incontinency, for the proffer of their bodies to all comers.  It is derived from the French estuves, baths, because wantons are wont to prepare themselves for venereous acts by bathing.  And this is not new.  Homer shews, in the eight book of his Odyssey, where he reckons hot baths among the effeminate sort of pleasures…Henry VIII, about the year 1546, forbade them [the stews] forever. --Thomas Blount’s Law Dictionary and Glossary, 1717

childwit--power to take a fine of your bondwoman [servant] gotten with child without your consent.--Elisha Cole’s English Dictionary, 1713

In Flanders Fields
By: Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD (1872-1918)
Canadian Army

IN FLANDERS FIELDS the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

 

MEMORIAL DAY

How do you want to be remembered?

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRIDAY, May 27, 2011, day 77

Group check-in:

  • Weekend?
  1. MEETING OF THE MINDS--MEETING #2
  2. Arcadia

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. OJ 25 Arcadia scenes 4-6

  2. HAND-OUTS and BOOKS!

Here's the Story of the Day:

forced to listen to abba, so she's hating the 80's just on principle

FRIDAY, May 27, 2011, day 77
  1. Work on the CT paper (remember NO BUYBACKS!!!) (technical aspects graded by avg. errors per page!) Read the purple packet outlining the CT paper  For a copy of this packet, click HERE.  It's due Wednesday, June 1. To see a copy of the packet and/or print off the grading sheet, click HERE.  Click HERE for a copy of brainstormed IDEAS FOR MEETING PLACES.

     

  2. ALL-CALL FOR HAND-OUTS and BOOKS!  We need them back!  BRING YOUR SURVIVAL PACKET, too!!!!"Gather ye hand-outs while ye may; Old time is still a flyin'!  For all books and hand-outs not turned in, Wally and Olson will be a cryin'!  :(
  3. PREP WORK FOR  Meeting of the Minds #3-  E-mail each other on your progress as the week goes on!  Scripts should be finalized, enough copies run for everyone, and each person's individual part highlighted!

  4. WARNING!!! ALL JOURNALS DUE FriDAY, June 3rd How are your journals coming?  You will turn in the WHOLE batch on  FRIDAY!  For a current (and FINAL!) master list of journals WITH LINKS TO THE DOCUMENTS EACH JOURNAL IS BASED ON, click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals Print out this list to turn in with all your WA's (to Wally) and OJ's (to Olson).  Be sure to pre-score your journals tranferring any scores on the journals already onto the grading sheet. Note that there are questions to answer (worth 5 points) on your journaling experience!  Put each set of journals in its own folder, please!  

    CLICK HERE WA 2011 FOR THE BEST PRINTABLE PDF FORM OF THE WA's OR FOR THE WORD DOCUMENT WA LIST, click HERE WA WORD 2011

    CLICK HERE OJ 2011 FOR THE BEST PRINTABLE PDF FORM OF THE OJ's OR HERE OJ WORD 2011.

     

  5. CARPE DIEM each and every day!  

ARCADIA PIX:

        

    

 

   

 

overflow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DUE FRIDAY! GAWAIN PARTS 1-2: ASSIGNMENT  G1

1.         Read the front page of the Sir Gawain packet.          IF YOU WERE ABSENT TODAY,  click HERE for a copy of the Gawain packet.

2.         Read the Introduction to Gawain -- see the white pages in the Gawain Packet right before the text of the poem    

3.         Read parts 1 and 2 (from pp. 202-225 in the Norton Anthology, 6th ed.).    BIG HINT!  You may want to read the poem aloud!

4.          Do WA 17  Some Preliminary Thoughts on Gawain parts 1 – 2

A.      After you have read the text,  think about these ideas :

a.        the significance/associations of the color green

b.       why Gawain was chosen for this "quest"

c.        how the "imperfect human is really the perfect human"

d.       comparisons and contrast between these three characters: Arthur, Sir Gawain, the Green Knight

e.        the symbolic significance/associations that are conjured up in your mind with the following animals:  a deer, a boar, a fox.  You may have been given a chart in which to write down these animal associations.  Jot down your ideas in the first column the chart

f.         how does Gawain qualify as a representative "medieval romance"

g.       what similarities and differences do you see between Beowulf and Gawain and the Green Knight.

B.       For the journal,  jot down your ideas on these:  

o        •reading the introduction,

o        •what happens in parts 1 and 2,

o        •at least three of the ideas listed above (a-g)

5.           Be prepared for a quiz  on the Intro., the information in the hand-out, & Gawain parts 1 and 2.

 

 

  1. Bring GREEN TREATS for FHGFY! -- Fantastic Healthy (?) Green Food Friday!
  2. DUE FRIDAY! GAWAIN PARTS 1-2: ASSIGNMENT  G1

    1.         Read the front page of the Sir Gawain packet.          IF YOU WERE ABSENT TODAY,  click HERE for a copy of the Gawain packet.

    2.         Read the Introduction to Gawain -- see the white pages in the Gawain Packet right before the text of the poem      Be prepared for a quiz on the Intro., the information in the hand-out, & Gawain parts 1 and 2.

    3.         Read parts 1 and 2 (from pp. 202-225 in the Norton Anthology, 6th ed.).    BIG HINT!  You may want to read the poem aloud!  Be prepared for a quiz on the Intro., the information in the hand-out, & Gawain parts 1 and 2.

    4.          Do WA 17  Some Preliminary Thoughts on Gawain parts 1 – 2

    A.      After you have read the text,  think about these ideas :

    a.        the significance/associations of the color green

    b.       why Gawain was chosen for this "quest"

    c.        how the "imperfect human is really the perfect human"

    d.       comparisons and contrast between these three characters: Arthur, Sir Gawain, the Green Knight

    e.        the symbolic significance/associations that are conjured up in your mind with the following animals:  a deer, a boar, a fox.  You may have been given a chart in which to write down these animal associations.  Jot down your ideas in the first column the chart

    f.         how does Gawain qualify as a representative "medieval romance"

    g.       what similarities and differences do you see between Beowulf and Gawain and the Green Knight.

    5.           Be prepared for a quiz on the Intro., the information in the hand-out, & Gawain parts 1 and 2.

DUE MONDAY! GAWAIN PARTS 3-4: ASSIGNMENT  G2 and G3 (depending on your NOVEL GROUP)

1.  Read parts 3 and 4. (pp. 258-288 in the Norton Anthology, 5th ed. Or pp. 225-254 in the Norton Anthology, 6th ed.). BIG HINT!  You may want to read the poem aloud!  Be prepared for a quiz on the Intro., the information in the hand-out, & Gawain parts 1 and 2.

2.  Fill out the Comparison / Contrast Chart  of the 3 Animals/Hunts/Temptations/Blows.  Click HERE for a copy of the chart. For a copy of the Gawain packet, click HERE.

After all the boxes are filled, look for ways the columns associate with each other.

a.        In the first column in the boxes under the word "Animals," jot down what symbolic significances/associations are conjured up in your mind with these animals:  a deer, a boar, a fox.

b.       In the second column in the boxes under the word "Bercilak's hunt," jot down what characterizes each hunt (how it is gone about, what methods are used, the results, etc.).

c.        In the third column in the boxes under the word "temptations," jot down what characterizes each of the three temptation experiences.  Look at both the strategies/reactions/results in terms of Sir Gawain and the Lady.

d.       In the fourth column in the boxes under the word "blows," jot down what characterizes each confrontation between Gawain and the Green Knight.

3.         Do WA 18 “Gawain Closure Topics”  (a minimum of one side – 5 pts.)

              Do the journal topic assigned to your NOVEL GROUP!

 Analytic Journal Entry on Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

 

Devote at least a page to your topic or whatever it takes to fully explore the topic.  Choose one of the two topics described below:

 GROUP A FRANKENSTEIN CHOICES:

 

 A1          Would Sir Gawain be considered a hero, even after his “mistake”?

 

  A2         Either agree or disagree.  Gawain came through the challenge successfully.  Give support.

 

GROUP B BEOWULF CHOICES:

 B1          If Gawain was reincarnated, what would we think of today’s society or today’s society think of him?  Is he admirable?

B2           Discuss why Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is considered by many to epitomize the medieval romance.

 GROUP C TALE OF TWO CITIES CHOICES:

C1           How does Gawain’s fate and success/lack of success reflect on the Knights of the Round Table?

C2           How does Sir Gawain and the Green Knight reflect Christian values?

GROUP D HAMLET CHOICES:

D1           Is dishonor worse than death in medieval society?  Is this still reflected in society today?

D2           Why do you think women are considered to be the “root of all evil” in Sir Gawain?  How does this relate to courtly love and its rules?

 GROUP E THINGS FALL APART CHOICES:

 

E1            What is so important about the sash?  Why does Gawain wear it forever?  What does this symbolize?  How does it differ from the nick on the neck?

E2            Is this a happy or unhappy ending?  Justify your answer.

___________________________________________________________________________________A

WA 18 TOPICS FOR THE OTHER GROUPS ARCADIA, OWEN MEANY AND HEART OF DARKNESS

Note!  You can choose whichever character's letter (characters are Arthur, Gawain, Morgan, or Felicia) you want to write!

 ASSIGNMENT G3: THE GREEN LETTERS

For this journal, you are to write a letter based on SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT.

 This is ALSO  WA# 18: _______________'s  (name of character writing letter)  Letter

GROUPS ARCADIA, OWEN MEANY AND HEART OF DARKNESS:  Choose one of the four scenarios below upon which to base a letter you will write.  Make sure you defend your viewpoint using examples (quotations are also welcome!) from the text.  Please keep plot summary to a minimum.  As always, your entry (the letter) must be a minimum of one page.  Circle the letter you choose, and write its title (“Arthur’s Letter,” for example) at the top of your page.

For Arthur's and Gawain's letters, base your viewpoint on this quote:

"Gawain is the ideal man because he demonstrates that he  cannot be the ideal--he's a man."        

1.         Arthur’s letter

Sir Cameron is a young knight currently studying in France.  He is one of Arthur's favorites and most promising knights.  Arthur knows that word has reached him about Sir Gawain's adventure with the Green Knight, and he also knows that Sir Cameron is very eager to learn to live his life according to the code of chivalry.  Arthur thinks he can learn a valuable lesson from Gawain's adventure and perhaps see Gawain as somewhat of a model.  Using the philosophy in the quote, write the letter Arthur might send to Sir Cameron to convince him of Gawain's success.  Start out your letter, “Dear Sir Cameron.”

2.         Gawain’s letter

Gawain has been home a few months now and has had time to reflect on his adventure with the Green Knight.  He still feels he has failed both himself and Arthur's court.  He knows of Arthur's young and promising favorite, Sir Cameron. He genuinely likes Sir Cameron and feels he may be the key to the future of Camelot and the perpetuation of the code of chivalry.  He decides to write a letter to his young friend hoping to convince him not to make the same mistakes he made and to not view his life as ideal.  Refuting the philosophy of the quote, write the letter Gawain might send to Sir Cameron to convince him that he would be wrong in seeing the adventure of the Green Knight as successful.  Start out your letter, “Dear Sir Cameron.”

For Morgan's and Felicia's letters, base your viewpoint on this quote: 

  1. "Gawain ...starts out as the perfect knight and moves downward ending as an imperfect ‘fol chevalier’ (chivalric fool or foolish gentleman) who is the object of laughter rather than admiration.”  

    3.         Morgan’s letter

    Morgan LeFay is convinced that her scheme was successful in showing the weakness and failure of Gawain and Arthur’s court.  She decides to write a letter to her cousin Felicia convincing her that she has triumphed and Gawain has ultimately fallen.  Using the philosophy of the quotation, write the letter from Morgan to Felicia.  Start out your letter, “Dear Felicia.”

    4.         Felicia’s letter

    Felicia has received the letter Morgan has written to her as described in question 3.  However, she believes Morgan is wrong and that her conclusion about Gawain ending up a fool and an object of ridicule rather than admiration is ludicrous.  She knows the story well and decides to write a letter back to Morgan convincing her that Gawain did not start out perfectly or move downward to end up the way the quote described.  Refuting the philosophy of the quote, write the return letter from Felicia to Morgan.  Start out your letter, “Dear Morgan.”

     

  2. A Glossary of Literary TermsPoetic Device Assignment (old ASSIGNMENT L #1).  If you missed class or are unaware of what terms you are assigned, click HERE to see what your assigned term(s)are.  Define your assigned Poetry Term(s) using TWO DIFFERENT SOURCES other than a generic dictionary and give several examples of each term. If you have many terms, one example will suffice. You may use the black textbook (LBT) for one of your definitions of your assigned terms, but you must find another CREDIBLE (not a generic dictionary like Webster's) source (it can be an online source like those linked below) for your other definition.  Look for literary terms dictionaries or check out websites such as the following:                  http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88/poetic-terms.html or  http://www.k-state.edu/english/baker/english320/cc.htm  or http://ethnicity.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Terms/  or http://www.northern.edu/hastingw/terms.htm   or  http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_I.html 

  3. WA 10: POEMS! POEMS! POEMS!  (3 topics over a minimum of 2 sides)  1. SHARE YOUR PERSONAL THOUGHTS/EXPERIENCES REGARDING POETRY and STUDYING POETRY.   2.  Skim through the blue Poetry Packet (PP) pp. OP-1 to OP-18.  CLICK HERE for a copy of the BLUE Poetry Packet if you didn't get it in class.  Read what strikes you.  Comment on what you found interesting in these pages.  If you are reacting to a particular poem, be sure to identify its title/poet. 3. Check out the websites linked below and comment on what you found interesting. Be sure to jot down the URL and the title/description of the site on which you are commenting!    Click HERE to see WALLY'S COOL POETRY LINKS!