back to AP English Home Page

Click  HERE for the CLASS OF 2011 PHOTO GALLERY.

Click the following website for the WEB ALBUM GALLERY:

https://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011APLitClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIre876Uxtrs2wE#

 

 

Welcome sweet spring . . . or as Chaucer would say,

 "Whan that Aprille with his shoures soote / The droghte of March hath perced to the roote, / And bathed every veyne in swich licour / Of which vertu engendred is the flour;"

 

WEEK 14a:  May 9-13, 2011

AP EXAM WEEK #2

CHAUCER   

"The Prologue" and "The Knight's Tale"

      

"The Miller's Tale" & "The Reeve's Tale" & "The Wife of Bath's Tale"   Gender Roles

CHAUCER by Baba!!!

BABA's HOME PAGE

http://www.babasword.com

Baba's Facebook

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Baba-Brinkman/49375021070

http://www.myspace.com/bababrinkman

He will rock you!

 

Baba rappin' Chaucer

MEETING OF THE MINDS KICK-OFF  

        

 

Click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  

Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals.

Click HERE to go automatically to the yellow HW packet!

Click HERE for another copy of the 4 week pink calendar.

To print more allusion and vocab sheets, click HERE!

LITERARY THEORY PAPER!

    

  Literary Theory paper is due

Wednesday , May 18th.  

To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE.  To print a copy of 2011 reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

CT paper (remember NO BUYBACKS!!!)

DUE WEDNESDAY, June 1st (technical aspects graded by avg. errors per page!)

Read the purple packet outlining the CT paper  For a copy of this packet, click HERE.To see a copy of the packet and/or print off the grading sheet, click HERE.  Click HERE for a copy of brainstormed IDEAS FOR MEETING PLACES.

 

EPHS ENGLISH DEPARTMENT SURVIVAL MANUAL  (rev. 11.22.09)

To print off the entire manual half size or full size or to use the manual online in "navigational mode," go to the EPHS English department home page and click on the buttons to the left of the screen:

http://ephs.edenpr.org/index.php?option=com_qcontacts&view=category&catid=76&Itemid=123

click HERE for the COVER with table of contents  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the GRS (Grammar Rules Summary) section--yellow

click HERE for the MSF (Manuscript Formatting Rules) section--yellow

click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) SHORT FORM--pink

Buybacks!  If  buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  Read the blue BUYBACK section of the Survival Packet CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure.   For a copy of this blue section, click HERE  If you would like to use a template to do your buybacks, click HERE. (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE.    For a STUDENT'S SAMPLE (not perfect, but close!) of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (pdf.verson) or  HERE (WORD) version.

Bet you couldn't wait!  Click right HERE or at the Purdue OWL website (great resource!) to see next year's MLA Rule Changes:

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/557/01/

 

 

 

 

DATE In-Class plan Homework (due next day almost always):

MONDAY, May 9th, day 63

 

   

W.H. AUDEN--Check out this website!  These "Auden groupies" (Virtual Street Band) like to make up songs and cartoons to

 Auden's work:
This Virtual Street Band (which only exists and performs in cyberspace) has put 3 poems of Auden to music and made some flash videoclips to go along with them. Checking this site out is totally recommended, the site has a really cool feel to it, and the clips are awesome.
http://www.virtualstreetband.com

"Slave to Beauty"--song to Brueghel's painting

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tT6p1vkq5h4&feature=related

Another cool Auden poem is "Funeral Blues" a.k.a. "Stop All the Clocks."  Here are some cool links to read and view some youtube stuff regarding this awesome poem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9LJ9we02Ls

reading of the poem from the film Four Weddings and a Funeral

Another reading of the poem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcAYsJo3-uM&mode=related&search=

"Funeral Blues" to music James Horner

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HqZZXuIiJEY

ALSO, click on the link below to watch Elizabeth Susan Hambleton, a painter from New York, NY, read "Musee": http://www.favoritepoem.org/thevideos/hambleton.html

 

Today's Allusion:

Pollyanna

Today's Words of the Day:

insouciant

intransigent

 

 

MONDAY, May 9th, day 63

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

Group check-in:

  • Weekend?
  • NOVEL GROUPS!
  1. Explain WA 20 Chaucerian Shadowing activity and OJ 18 "Hello, Chaucer!" (record observations as you observe a stranger for 5-10 min.)   Be sure to make predictions, make up a name and age.  Then, reflect on the concept of physiognomy and the humors.  According to the directions in the homework packet, finish back side with your own reflections/experiences.
  2. HOW DID AP ESSAY GO?
  3. POPE ACTIVITY:  Pope quotes--each person gets a slip and needs to find groups of 2 or three.  Discuss the meaning, the connections to writing, and any poetic devices that surface. 
  4. Advice to Writers" and allusion to Alexander Pope! Maybe show DVD of Billy Collins' "How to Read a Poem" and various experts' opinions on poetry and Collins.  
  5. "Musee" Read aloud and groups look for DIDLS:  tone, diction, imagery, syntax, etc. in "Musee des Beaux Arts"  CLICK HERE FOR A COPY OF "MUSEE"  Discuss  "Musee"--Gut reaction--is "Musee" an optimistic or a pessimistic poem.  What are the universal questions?  Why did I have you read "Meditation l7"?  What connections are there?  Click HERE for MUSEE section of poetry packet. 

    a.  SHARE SOMETHING FROM THE BACK OF YOUR WA--MORE ON AUDEN--something from page OP 20-24; OP 26-29 AND what you each thought about one of the "Musee" reviews, and Brian Russell's e-mail. 

    b.  Leftovers from "Musee"-What are the universal questions

    c.  John Donne & six degrees theory Why did I have you read "Meditation l7"?  What connections are there?

    d.  Read NY Times article "The Way We Were" and discuss how the poem is effectively used--the ploughman, where the last sentence uses word "signifying" (allusion),

    e.  Show Billy Collins parody on "Musee"   

    f. read Macbeth's speech "To-morrow and to-morrow"

    g. Read "Out, Out" again as groups look for tone, DIDLS.  Maybe view video.   Favorite Poem project  "Out, out"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1V07Hu5d_Dg&feature=user

    h.  Discuss Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

     If you would like to read Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery," you can get a copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

    1.   MAYBE Gatsby excerpt--CLICK HERE  FOR THE GATSBY,  Look for around 5 words from these pages (or of your own choice) which best describe the TONE of this passage.  Write them down right by your original evaluation of TONE.  Do these words fit what you thought from the outset--positive, negative, neutral, indifferent?

      Camus passage ( from The Stranger) on page E6 of the Poetry packet.  Do the same thing as you did with the Gatsby excerpt.  If you would like a copy of this passage to print out and mark up, click HERE.

      HOW DID AP ESSAY GO?

      1. TONE/MOOD WORK

        "C'mon Lou" tone activity

        Show TONE/MOOD words from exercise pages and Poetry Packet and relate those to "Musee" and "Out, Out--"Click HERE for a sheet on more specific tone words. You may have to look up some words (i.e., simpering, bantering, pedantic, disdainful, sardonic?)   pages E1, E3, E4 in the Poetry packet and look at the words to describe tone. 

        TONE ex. multiple choice answers.  Try to come to consensus. Write group answers down. Click HERE to print out a copy of this exercise.

        Gatsby excerpt--CLICK HERE  FOR THE GATSBY,  Look for around 5 words from these pages (or of your own choice) which best describe the TONE of this passage.  Write them down right by your original evaluation of TONE.  Do these words fit what you thought from the outset--positive, negative, neutral, indifferent?

        Camus passage ( from The Stranger) on page E6 of the Poetry packet.  Do the same thing as you did with the Gatsby excerpt.  If you would like a copy of this passage to print out and mark up, click HERE.

      2. "Musee" Read aloud and groups look for DIDLS:  tone, diction, imagery, syntax, etc. in "Musee des Beaux Arts"  CLICK HERE FOR A COPY OF "MUSEE"  Discuss  "Musee"--Gut reaction--is "Musee" an optimistic or a pessimistic poem.  What are the universal questions?  Why did I have you read "Meditation l7"?  What connections are there?  Click HERE for MUSEE section of poetry packet. 
  6. Read "Out, Out" again as groups look for tone, DIDLS.  Maybe view video.   Favorite Poem project  "Out, out"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1V07Hu5d_Dg&feature=user

    h.  Discuss Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

     If you would like to read Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery," you can get a copy of it online: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/lotry.html  interesting review:  http://www.netwood.net/~kosenko/jackson.html

  7. IF TIME, Gatsby excerpt--CLICK HERE  FOR THE GATSBY,  Look for around 5 words from these pages (or of your own choice) which best describe the TONE of this passage.  Write them down right by your original evaluation of TONE.  Do these words fit what you thought from the outset--positive, negative, neutral, indifferent?

    Camus passage ( from The Stranger) on page E6 of the Poetry packet.  Do the same thing as you did with the Gatsby excerpt.  If you would like a copy of this passage to print out and mark up, click HERE.

  8. NEW TERMS TODAY:  essay,  schema, metaphor, simile conceit, syntax, stanza, rhyme, paradox/oxymoron, mood, DIDLS (diction, imagery, details, language, syntax), juxtaposition, apostrophe, quatrain, couplet, octave, sestet, slant rhyme, essay, rhyme, slant rhyme, tone, mood, rhythm, sprung rhythm, ITAD:  iambic (u/), trochaic (/u), anapestic (uu/), dactylic (/uu), monometer, dimeter, trimeter, tetrameter, pentameter, hexameter, heptameter, , meter, foot, sonnet--2 types: Shakespearean (3 quatrains=abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd or ? heroic couplet, euphony, cacophony, euphemism, pejorative. maxim,   irony.  imagery  denotation, connotation,  symbol,  
  9.  

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

none

 

MONDAY, May 9th, day 63

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. WA  20 "Chaucerian Shadowing" (2 sider--front side observation notes and predictions/back side about physiognomy/humors and YOU!)  Follow the linked hand-out on how to do this (click HERE)  Click HERE for a copy of the Chaucer Packet (the front cover has the Chaucerian Shadowing assignment explained). (This is old AP ASSIGNMENT C2)  If you were absent today and missed our explaining the shadowing experience, follow the instructions outlined HERE.

    FOR FUN!  Below are listed are some cool websites on the humors.  You can take a test and find out if your personality is sanguine, melancholy, choleric, or phlegmatic (rather like the COLOR tests).

    First site--click on the link, then select "Take the Free Personality/Temperament test online."

    http://www.oneishy.com/personality/

    FOR FUN!  Here is a site where someone blogs about shadowing-type experiences:  http://random-people.me/

    Click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  

    Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals.

     

     

  2. OJ 18 "Hello Chaucer!" (2 sides minimum)  For the first side,  read "Some Introductory Observations for the Modern Reader of The Canterbury Tales" pp. xiii-xxix. take one side of a page of notes on anything that strikes you as interesting/important to the study of Chaucer/The Canterbury Tales

  3. For the back  side of OJ 18 "Hello Chaucer!", read the "Prologue to Canterbury Tales" pp. 1-18.   On the top of the back side of this journal, write "Getting to Know You" (1 side minimum-- 1/2 page introducing/describing your assigned character you and your partner picked from the FATE CAN today and 1/2 page about you as if Chaucer were to introduce/describe you in the same technique he uses for his characters .  NOTE:  if you were NOT in class today to get an assigned character, choose any one you'd like.  However, make sure to indicate on the top of your OJ 18: Getting to Know You  that you chose your own character!) (This is old AP ASSIGNMENT C1)

    Click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  

    Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals.

     

    FOR FUN!  Below are listed are some cool websites on the humors.  You can take a test and find out if your personality is sanguine, melancholy, choleric, or phlegmatic (rather like the COLOR tests).  First site--click on the link, then select "Take the Free Personality/Temperament test online now."

    http://www.oneishy.com/personality/

    Another site--click on the link, then select "Eysenck Personality Test (46 questions)"

    www.similarminds.com/cgibin/eysenck.pl

    FOR FUN!  Here are some more Chaucer websites to check out:

    http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

    http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

    http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

    Here are some cool Chaucer websites to check out:

    http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

    http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

    http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

  4. Work on Literary Theory paper! (due Wednesday , May 18th).  

    To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

    To print a copy of 2011 reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE

     

 

TUESDAY,  May 10th, day 64

HELLO, MR. CHAUCER!!!!

Say . . . .   can you read the following?

"Whan that Aprille with his shoures soote / The droghte of March hath perced to the roote, / And bathed every veyne in swich licour / Of which vertu engendred is the flour;"

   Click on the picture of the Canterbury Cathedral to listen to the first part of Canterbury Tales in Middle English!

     

Today's Quotes of the Day:

"Every exit is an entry somewhere else."

-- Tom Stoppard (Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead)

"All a man can betray is his conscience."

-- Joseph Conrad

Today's Allusion:

Pavlov's dogs/Pavlovian

Today's Words of the Day:

petulant

idiosyncracy

Wally taught at Geoffery Chaucer School in the summer of 1988

the very spot where St. Thomas Becket was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral

Do you see Robby up in the corner teasing me that he was going to throw something on the "hallowed spot"?  Oh, those kids!

WE Lve CHaUCER!

Today's FORGOTTEN ENGLISH

Words of the Day:

antiquarium  -- A repository of antiquities.   --Sir James Murray’s New English Dictionary, 1888

contumely -- rudeness, contemptuousness, reproach

William Grimshaw’s Ladies’ Lexicon and Parlour Companion, 1854

Click HERE for a copy of more fun FORGOTTEN ENGLISH Words of the Day!

FOR FUN!  Below are listed are some cool websites on the humors.  You can take a test and find out if your personality is sanguine, melancholy, choleric, or phlegmatic (rather like the COLOR tests).   First site--click on the link, then select "Take the Free Personality/Temperament test online now."

http://www.oneishy.com/personality/

Another site--click on the link, then select "Eysenck Personality Test (46 questions)"

www.similarminds.com/cgibin/eysenck.pl

FOR FUN!  Here are some more Chaucer websites to check out:

http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

http://geoffreychaucer.org/language/

MORE FUN STUFF FROM BABA BRINKMAN:

BABA BRINKMAN VISITS EPHS  April 2009

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ck-h72d7iV0

BABA's HOME PAGE

http://www.babasword.com/index/index.html

BABA's MYSPACE (includes MP3 "The Pardoner's Tale")

http://www.myspace.com/bababrinkman

May 17, 2007 Interview with BABA in Birmingham

http://www.babasword.com/audio/bbcverma.mp3

watch some of BABA's performances

http://www.babasword.com/index/video.html

 

TUESDAY,  May 10th, day 64

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. Group check-in:
  • Small Group: Debrief Chaucerian Shadowing Activity:  CT packet Write on page 7, questions 2-3 (debrief Ch. Shadowing and brainstorm places)
  • Prologue?
  1. HOW DID AP ESSAY GO?
  2. POPE ACTIVITY:  Pope quotes--each person gets a slip and needs to find groups of 2 or three.  Discuss the meaning, the connections to writing, and any poetic devices that surface. 
  3. Advice to Writers" and allusion to Alexander Pope! Maybe show DVD of Billy Collins' "How to Read a Poem" and various experts' opinions on poetry and Collins.  
  4. "Musee" Read aloud and groups look for DIDLS:  tone, diction, imagery, syntax, etc. in "Musee des Beaux Arts"  CLICK HERE FOR A COPY OF "MUSEE"  Discuss  "Musee"--Gut reaction--is "Musee" an optimistic or a pessimistic poem.  What are the universal questions?  Why did I have you read "Meditation l7"?  What connections are there?  Click HERE for MUSEE section of poetry packet. 

    a.  SHARE SOMETHING FROM THE BACK OF YOUR WA--MORE ON AUDEN--something from page OP 20-24; OP 26-29 AND what you each thought about one of the "Musee" reviews, and Brian Russell's e-mail. 

    b.  Leftovers from "Musee"-What are the universal questions

    c.  John Donne & six degrees theory Why did I have you read "Meditation l7"?  What connections are there?

    d.  Read NY Times article "The Way We Were" and discuss how the poem is effectively used--the ploughman, where the last sentence uses word "signifying" (allusion),

    e.  Show Billy Collins parody on "Musee"   

    f. read Macbeth's speech "To-morrow and to-morrow"

    g. Read "Out, Out" again as groups look for tone, DIDLS.  Maybe view video.   Favorite Poem project  "Out, out"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1V07Hu5d_Dg&feature=user

  5.  

  6. HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

    1. WA 20 Chaucerian Shadowing

    2. OJ 19 Hello, Chaucer--notes, Getting to Know a Character, Getting to Know YOU on the CT.

    3. HAND-OUTS and BOOKS!

     

     

 

TUESDAY,  May 10th, day 64

BOTH OLES & WALLIES

  1. ASSIGNMENT C3: THERE ONCE WAS A GENTLE KNIGHT (DUE THURSDAY)  Read "The Knight's Tale" (pp. 18-58)

    1.         Re-read the section in the prologue which introduces the knight (pp. 1-2).

    2.         Now read "The Knight's Tale" in the Lumiansky pp. 19-63.

    As you read, keep track of the characters and their relationships/connections to the gods.  If you haven't studied much mythology, I suggest you look up these gods:  Zeus, Mars, Venus, Diana, Pluto, Saturn.  (Some have Greek names as well as Roman names.

    Then, do OJ 19: "About the 'Knight's Tale": worksheet (both sides) and journal (one side minimum) = 15 points

    Click HERE for copy of the worksheet.

    3.        Do journal entry  OJ 19  “About ‘The Knight’s Tale’” Now reflect on this tale.  Think about your first impressions or reactions or things that make you say "hmmm" or "aha." In your minimum of one side of a page journal entry, respond to the following:

    CHOOSE ONE OF THESE 7 TOPICS (A-G)TO RESPOND TO.  You must write at least a page on your topic of choice!  BE SURE TO JOT DOWN THE TOPIC CHOICE AT THE TOP OF THE JOURNAL.

    A. Your own observations...

    What struck you as you read the tale?  What bothered you? Which characters seem most important?  With which characters did you identify?  What did you like or dislike about the tale?

    B. Relationship of the teller to the tale.

    Look back tat the description of the teller in the prologue.  In what ways does this tale “suit the teller”?  In what ways might the teller of the tale connect with the tale’s message or plot?

    C. Characters

    Who are the major characters in the tale?  Who is the protagonist? Who are possible antagonists?  What is the central conflict?  How is it resolved?  What does anyone learn throughout or by the end of the tale?

    D. The tale as a reflection of the Medieval Period

    What do we learn about the Medieval Period through the reading of this tale:  What does the tale seem to tell us about what Medieval people were like, what they held as important, how they interacted, what they did with their time?

    E. Motifs (recurring situations, plot elements, character types, etc.  An example would be the "lovers' triangle.")

    What plot elements do you recognize from other works of literature?  What things are repeated within the story itself?  Are there any stereotypes?

    F. Literary Theory

    Which literary theorist(s) (formalist, psychoanalytic, reader response theorist, feminist, Marxist, deconstructor, or New Historicist) would be most interested in this tale?  Why?  About what aspects would the theorist have an interest in?  Now, choose a theory and discuss how that theorist might interpret at least one part of the story or the story as a whole? 

    G. THEME

    Choose ONE of the following popular medieval (and universally age-old) themes.  Discuss what is said about ONE of these in "The Knight's Tale."

    •the conflict of free will vs. destiny (fate or fortune) 

    •the restoration of order

    •adherence to a chivalric code or a code of honor

    •the tension between head and heart

    What universal truths/questions emerge from the tale?  These could relate as much to our lives today as they did to the people of the Medieval Period.  Does Chaucer seem to advocate/promote a certain way of life or viewpoint towards something in the tale?  What's in it for ALL of us?

Work on Literary Theory paper! (due Wednesday , May 18th).  

To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

To print a copy of 2011 reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

 

 

WEDNESDAY,  May 11th, day 65

Check out this website to learn more about the Ellesmere:

http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

If you would like to see more of the Canterbury Cathedral, including an interactive tour, go to this website:

http://www.canterbury-cathedral.org/

   Click on the picture of the Canterbury Cathedral to listen to the first part of Canterbury Tales in Middle English!  Here's the text:

1: Whan that aprill with his shoures soote
2: The droghte of march hath perced to the roote,
3: And bathed every veyne in swich licour
4: Of which vertu engendred is the flour;
5: Whan zephirus eek with his sweete breeth
6: Inspired hath in every holt and heeth
7: Tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne
8: Hath in the ram his halve cours yronne,
9: And smale foweles maken melodye,
10: That slepen al the nyght with open ye
11: (so priketh hem nature in hir corages);
12: Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,
13: And palmeres for to seken straunge strondes,
14: To ferne halwes, kowthe in sondry londes;

15: And specially from every shires ende
16: Of engelond to caunterbury they wende,
17: The hooly blisful martir for to seke,
18: That hem hath holpen whan that they were seeke.
19: Bifil that in that seson on a day,
20: In southwerk at the tabard as I lay
21: Redy to wenden on my pilgrymage
22: To caunterbury with ful devout corage,
23: At nyght was come into that hostelrye
24: Wel nyne and twenty in a compaignye,
25: Of sondry folk, by aventure yfalle
26: In felaweshipe, and pilgrimes were they alle,
27: That toward caunterbury wolden ryde.
28: The chambres and the stables weren wyde,
29: And wel we weren esed atte beste.

 

To see Wally's 1988 pictures from Canterbury, the Canterbury Cathedral, and Geoffrey Chaucer School, click HERE!

To see Wally's 1988 and 2006 pictures from Canterbury, the Canterbury Cathedral, and Geoffrey Chaucer School, click HERE!

Carina and Robby relaxing in the British Library in London after just seeing the original copies of Beowulf and Canterbury Tales!  Excited, aren't they?  Here's what the Library looks like from the outside:

Today's Quotes of the Day:

"It is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose"   -- Jim Elliot

"I want to be strong, I want to laugh along, I want to belong to the living." --Joni Mitchell

Today's Allusion:

Pavlov's dogs/Pavlovian

Today's FORGOTTEN ENGLISH

Words of the Day:

nabble

To gnaw.  A stronger word than nibble, by a change of vowel.  Mice nibble and rats nabble our victuals, and hares and rabbits our growing vegetables.

   --Rev. Robert Forby’s Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830 

Hobbes’ voyage

A leap in the dark, in allusion to the last saying of Thomas Hobbes the philosopher, “Now I am about to take my last voyage, a leap in the dark.”

   --Albert Hyamson’s Dictionary of English Phrases, 1922

Click HERE for a copy of more fun FORGOTTEN ENGLISH Words of the Day!

Chaucer: He will rock you!

Baba rappin' Chaucer

Listen to BABA's ME first few lines of PROLGUE and then RAP prologue

http://www.babasword.com/audio/2generalprologue.mp3

Listen to BABA's ME first few lines of PROLGUE and then RAP prologue

http://www.babasword.com/audio/2generalprologue.mp3

 Read side by side BABA's sample translation of CT in Middle English to RAP

http://www.babasword.com/writing/poetry/pardcontrast.html

Listen to sample from BABA's Chaucer biography

http://www.babasword.com/teaching/chaucerbio.html

 

  1. To learn about Baba Brinkman's "lit-hop" inspired by Canterbury Tales, click http://www.babasword.com/writing/rapcantales.html

    MORE FUN STUFF FROM BABA BRINKMAN:

    BABA's HOME PAGE

    http://www.myspace.com/bababrinkman

    May 17, 2007 Interview with BABA in Birmingham

    http://www.babasword.com/audio/bbcverma.mp3

    watch some of BABA's performances

    http://www.babasword.com/index/video.html

    Listen to any of BABA's tales/recordings (NOT JUST SAMPLES BUT THE WHOLE THING, I think)

    http://www.babasword.com/audio/

    Listen to BABA's ME first few lines of PROLGUE and then RAP prologue

    http://www.babasword.com/audio/2generalprologue.mp3

     Read side by side BABA's sample translation of CT in Middle English to RAP

    http://www.babasword.com/index/index.html

    BABA's MYSPACE (includes MP3 "The Pardoner's Tale")

    http://www.babasword.com/writing/poetry/pardcontrast.html

    Listen to sample from BABA's Chaucer biography

    http://www.babasword.com/teaching/chaucerbio.html

    Listen to sample from BABA's "The Miller's Tale"

    http://www.babasword.com/audio/miller.mp3

    Listen to sample from BABA's "The Wife of Bath"

    http://www.babasword.com/audio/wife.mp3

     Listen to sample from BABA's "The Pardoner's Tale"

    http://www.babasword.com/audio/pardoner.mp3

    Listen to sample from BABA's "The Knight's Tale"

    http://www.babasword.com/audio/knight.mp3

     Listen to sample from BABA's "Dead Poets' Society"

    http://www.babasword.com/audio/deadpoets.mp3

    BABA's "Dead Poets' Society" text

    http://www.babasword.com/writing/poetry/deadpoets.html

     article about BABA at the Vancouver Fringe

    http://www.babasword.com/press/qarticle.html

    article review BABA's latest CD "Lit-Hop"

    http://www.lucidforge.com/album-reviews/baba-brinkman-lit-hop.html?Itemid=6

     

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEDNESDAY,  May 11th, day 65

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. Group check-in:
  1. Small Group: Debrief Chaucerian Shadowing Activity:  CT packet Write on page 7, questions 2-3 (debrief Ch. Shadowing and brainstorm places)
  2. Debrief Shadowing experience--Chaucer Packet pp. 1-5. 
  3. LG debrief of Ch. Shadowing--show Goldsworthy, bus story about Minnesota sanguine Show Ch. Packet pp. 3-5 articles:  TEEN magazine physiognomy ex. & Twin Cities personalities,  Lookism articles, “dress for success” articles  MAKE A TRANSPARENCY OF IDEAS FOR PLACES FOR PILGRIMS TO MEET.   CLICK HERE FOR SAMPLE.   Pass around the class for groups to add ideas during group work
  4. Debrief Chaucerian Shadowing activity and WA20 "Hello, Chaucer!" (record observations as you observe a stranger for 5-10 min.)   Be sure to make predictions, make up a name and age.  Then, reflect on the concept of physiognomy and the humors.  According to the directions in the homework packet, finish back side with your own reflections/experiences.
  5. INTRO TO CHAUCER: discuss frame story, physiognomy, medieval triangle, people watching and the CT paper
  6. Tell about Ellesmere Manuscript and Huntingdon Library--CLICK HERE for article "Canterbury Sales"  and show websites:

    http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

    http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

    http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

  7. DEBRIEF  questions 4-5 CHAUCER’S   LIFE—share pp. 7-8 Q #4 first & then p. 6 geneological chart
  8. CT BACKGROUND INFO: (p. 8 CT packet) organization of CT, reason for a retraction, reason for pilgrimages, how CT reflects medieval genres, the triangle of medieval society.  The genres reflected in Canterbury Tales

    Tell about Ellesmere Manuscript and Huntingdon Library--CLICK HERE for article "Canterbury Sales"  and show websites:

    http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

    http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

    http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

    and Huntingdon Library--show websites:

    http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

    http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

    http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

     

  9. HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

    1. WA 21 The Knight's Tale & worksheet

    2. HAND-OUTS and BOOKS!

     

  1.  

 
WEDNESDAY,  May 11th, day 65

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. ASSIGNMENT C3: THERE ONCE WAS A GENTLE KNIGHT  Read "The Knight's Tale" (pp. 18-58)

    1.         Re-read the section in the prologue which introduces the knight (pp. 1-2).

    2.         Now read "The Knight's Tale" in the Lumiansky pp. 19-63.

    As you read, keep track of the characters and their relationships/connections to the gods.  If you haven't studied much mythology, I suggest you look up these gods:  Zeus, Mars, Venus, Diana, Pluto, Saturn.  (Some have Greek names as well as Roman names.

    Then, do OJ 19: "About the 'Knight's Tale": worksheet (both sides) and journal (one side minimum) = 15 points

    Click HERE for copy of the worksheet.

    3.        Do journal entry  OJ 19  “About ‘The Knight’s Tale’” Now reflect on this tale.  Think about your first impressions or reactions or things that make you say "hmmm" or "aha." In your minimum of one side of a page journal entry, respond to the following:

    CHOOSE ONE OF THESE 7 TOPICS (A-G)TO RESPOND TO.  You must write at least a page on your topic of choice!  BE SURE TO JOT DOWN THE TOPIC CHOICE AT THE TOP OF THE JOURNAL.

    A. Your own observations...

    What struck you as you read the tale?  What bothered you? Which characters seem most important?  With which characters did you identify?  What did you like or dislike about the tale?

    B. Relationship of the teller to the tale.

    Look back tat the description of the teller in the prologue.  In what ways does this tale “suit the teller”?  In what ways might the teller of the tale connect with the tale’s message or plot?

    C. Characters

    Who are the major characters in the tale?  Who is the protagonist? Who are possible antagonists?  What is the central conflict?  How is it resolved?  What does anyone learn throughout or by the end of the tale?

    D. The tale as a reflection of the Medieval Period

    What do we learn about the Medieval Period through the reading of this tale:  What does the tale seem to tell us about what Medieval people were like, what they held as important, how they interacted, what they did with their time?

    E. Motifs (recurring situations, plot elements, character types, etc.  An example would be the "lovers' triangle.")

    What plot elements do you recognize from other works of literature?  What things are repeated within the story itself?  Are there any stereotypes?

    F. Literary Theory

    Which literary theorist(s) (formalist, psychoanalytic, reader response theorist, feminist, Marxist, deconstructor, or New Historicist) would be most interested in this tale?  Why?  About what aspects would the theorist have an interest in?  Now, choose a theory and discuss how that theorist might interpret at least one part of the story or the story as a whole? 

    G. THEME

    Choose ONE of the following popular medieval (and universally age-old) themes.  Discuss what is said about ONE of these in "The Knight's Tale."

    •the conflict of free will vs. destiny (fate or fortune) 

    •the restoration of order

    •adherence to a chivalric code or a code of honor

    •the tension between head and heart

    What universal truths/questions emerge from the tale?  These could relate as much to our lives today as they did to the people of the Medieval Period.  Does Chaucer seem to advocate/promote a certain way of life or viewpoint towards something in the tale?  What's in it for ALL of us?

    Work on Literary Theory paper! (due Wednesday , May 18th).  

    To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

    To print a copy of 2011 reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

    FOR FUN!  Below are listed are some cool websites on the humors.  You can take a test and find out if your personality is sanguine, melancholy, choleric, or phlegmatic (rather like the COLOR tests).  First site--click on the link, then select "Take the Free Personality/Temperament test online now."

    http://www.oneishy.com/personality/

    Another site--click on the link, then select "Eysenck Personality Test (46 questions)"

    www.similarminds.com/cgibin/eysenck.pl

    FUN!  To read more about the Ellesmere CT Manuscript, click below:

    http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

    http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

    http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

     

THURSDAY,  May 12th, day 66

The Knight from A Knight's Tale

Arcite and Palomon:

Today's Quote of the Day:

"I wanted a perfect ending . . . Now I've learned, the hard way, that some poems don't rhyme, and some stories don't have a clear beginning, middle, and end.  Life is about NOT knowing, having to change, taking the moment and making the best of it, without knowing what's going to happen next--DELICIOUS AMBIGUITY!"  -- Gilda Radner

Today's Allusion:

Bedlam

Today's FORGOTTEN ENGLISH

Words of the Day:

green gown The supposed badge of the loss of virginity.

--John Jamieson’s Etymological Scottish Dictionary, 1808

A tousle in the new-mown hay…beyond the bounds of innocent play.

--Ebenezer Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1898

To give a lass a green gown:  to throw her down upon the grass so that the gown was stained.

--Walter Skeat’s Glossary of Tudor and Stuart Word, 1914

anabrochismus An operation for removing the eyelashes…by means of a hair knotted around them.

--Dr. Robley Dunglison’s Dictionary of Medical Science, 1844.

Click HERE for a copy of more fun FORGOTTEN ENGLISH   Words of the Day!

Listen to any of BABA's tales/recordings (NOT JUST SAMPLES BUT THE WHOLE THING, I think)

http://www.babasword.com/audio/

Listen to BABA's ME first few lines of PROLGUE and then RAP prologue

http://www.babasword.com/audio/2generalprologue.mp3

 Read side by side BABA's sample translation of CT in Middle English to RAP

http://www.babasword.com/writing/poetry/pardcontrast.html

Listen to sample from BABA's Chaucer biography

http://www.babasword.com/teaching/chaucerbio.html

Listen to sample from BABA's "The Miller's Tale"

http://www.babasword.com/audio/miller.mp3

Listen to sample from BABA's "The Wife of Bath"

http://www.babasword.com/audio/wife.mp3

 Listen to sample from BABA's "The Pardoner's Tale"

http://www.babasword.com/audio/pardoner.mp3

Listen to sample from BABA's "The Knight's Tale"

http://www.babasword.com/audio/knight.mp3

 Listen to sample from BABA's "Dead Poets' Society"

http://www.babasword.com/audio/deadpoets.mp3

 

 

 

 

THURSDAY,  May 12th, day 66

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. Group check-in:
  • Check-in
  • Jot down
  1. FINISH
  2. CT BACKGROUND INFO: (p. 8 CT packet) organization of CT, reason for a retraction, reason for pilgrimages, how CT reflects medieval genres, the triangle of medieval society.  The genres reflected in Canterbury Tales

    Tell about Ellesmere Manuscript and Huntingdon Library--CLICK HERE for article "Canterbury Sales"  and show websites:

    http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

    http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

    http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

    and Huntingdon Library--show websites:

    http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

    http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

    http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

     

  3. The PROLOGUE!  What is "PHYSIOGNOMY"? Define physiognomy (use  p. 9 Ch. Packet) and jot down examples from CT AND define humors (CT pac. p. 9) and use overheads.  Talk about husband/wife (melancholy & sanguine) who go around country lecturing on the this. Discuss ex. of humors in CT:  p. 10 physician, franklin, Chanticleer (red bile), Goldsworthy, bus story about Minnesota sanguine  If time, show Shallow Hal film clip—3 min. 20 sec. (ff to 37:00)   More in Chaucer Packet pp. 3-5 articles:  TEEN magazine physiognomy ex. & Twin Cities personalities,  Lookism articles, “dress for success” articles, Goldsworthy, bus story about Minnesota sanguine, Julia's website to find out more about the humors  MORE HUMORS STUFF:  Click HERE for HUMORS and DIET article and HERE for historical way HUMORS turned into COLORS and HERE for Humor Me Folger article.Ch. Packet pp. 9-10 Physiognomy and the Humors. More in Chaucer Packet pp. 3-5 articles:  TEEN magazine physiognomy ex. & Twin Cities personalities,  Lookism articles, “dress for success” articles, Goldsworthy, bus story about Minnesota sanguine, Julia's website to find out more about the humors
  4. STUDENTS READ HUMORS POEM ALOUD--Click HERE or HERE for a copy of the HUMORS poem.

    MIDDLE ENGLISH, etc. Samuel Johnson's Dictionary. Early Modern English and Shakespeare's impact.  Talk about slurvish.   maybe (or do with Chaucer) Modern English--Marketplace activity--Yes, Mother I have 3 activity, cognates, dialect vs. legitimate language, härma, Folke Hedblom's research, pinka, Chaucer school incidents with language, "w" in Swedish and å, ä, and ö letters. Immersion language teaching?  CLV www.concordialanguagevillages.org If time, read "English is a Crazy Language" (assign 5 people to help) and Brian Russell's poem, "The Fall of English"

    Teaching in Canterbury--show pictures

  5. The genres reflected in Canterbury Tales

    Tell about Ellesmere Manuscript and Huntingdon Library--CLICK HERE for article "Canterbury Sales"  and show websites:

    http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

    http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

    http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

  6. Show A Knight’s Tale film clip—Stories for the People (2 min. 10 sec) and if time featurettes--Rock Music, Sports Promoter
  7. "THE KNIGHT'S TALE" Small groups--work on your assigned questions from "The Knight's Tale" agenda (long one) or HERE blue short one with Courteous Knight attached (ONE PER GROUP)
  8. "Knight's Tale" discussion:  initial reactions,  Boethius, Boccacio poem, medieval romance genre characteristics, group work on assigned questions: roles of women, role of gods/goddesses, universal questions,  themes (free will vs. destiny, chivalric duty & honor), why the original story was called the "Story of Theseus."
  9. IF TIME: Show more of A Knight’s Tale film clip—World's First Sports Herald (1 min. 32 sec) and Rock Music in 14th century (2 min. and 4 sec) , "A Director’s Quest” (5 min. 45 sec.) and maybe, “HBO Making of Knight’s Tale” (10 min.).

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1.  

  2. HAND-OUTS and BOOKS!

 

 

THURSDAY,  May 12th, day 66

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. Fantastic Healthy Food Friday!
  2. CC#3  KIDS ON A TREE (2 sider) You need a hand-out to do this CC.  Click HERE if you missed it in class.    (Designate which teacher you would like to read this one. You may indicate whether you want both teachers to read CC#3, too, or you may simply write down "EITHER" if it doesn't matter which teacher reads your CC#3.)  NOTE:  You need a special hand-out to do this journal.
  3. Work on Literary Theory paper! (due Wednesday , May 18th).  

    To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

    To print a copy of 2011 reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

    FOR FUN!  Below are listed are some cool websites on the humors.  You can take a test and find out if your personality is sanguine, melancholy, choleric, or phlegmatic (rather like the COLOR tests).  First site--click on the link, then select "Take the Free Personality/Temperament test online now."

    http://www.oneishy.com/personality/

    Another site--click on the link, then select "Eysenck Personality Test (46 questions)"

    www.similarminds.com/cgibin/eysenck.pl

    FOR FUN!  Here are some more Chaucer websites to check out:

    http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

    http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

    http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

    Here are some cool Chaucer websites to check out:

    http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

    http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

    http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

    PLEASE Bring back ALL BOOKS  and hand-outs! Hear ye!  Hear ye! ALL-CALL FOR HAND-OUTS and BOOKS (Stack all of them up with a post-it on top with your name on it. Give us all of those signed out to you.  Do NOT give us the books one at a time!  We need them back or NO diploma!)  "Gather ye hand-outs while ye may; Old time is still a flyin'!  For all books and hand-outs not turned in, Wally and Olson will be a cryin'!  :(

FRIDAY,  May 13th, day 67

PROM!

Here are some vintage photos!

Bring or e-mail Wally lwallenberg@edenpr.org  a prom picture for the website (if you like)!

 

Wally at Prom 1971  YIKES!  Check out the flower child dress!

 

Wally as Cinderella at Gustavus 1972 with  the Prince

 

HERE'S MORE VINTAGE OLSON!

 

 

Can you find Wally?

Can you find Ms. Ruce? 

YIKES!  Look at Mr. McCartan as a senior BELOW?  Whose that  22 year old with him?

 

Today's Quote of the Day:

"You are a human BEING, and not a HUMAN WAS or WILL BE"

Today's Allusion:

the handwriting on the wall

 

Today's FORGOTTEN ENGLISH

Words of the Day:

celibataire:  bachelor

--T. Lewis Davie’s Supplemental English Glossary, 1881

fribbler  A trifler; one who professes rapture for a woman yet dreads her consent.

--Samuel Johnson’s Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

Click HERE for a copy of more fun

 
FRIDAY,  May 13th, day 67
  • Check-in that every
  • weekend
  •  
  •  

 

  1. eawsgfew

  2. "THE KNIGHT'S TALE" Small groups--work on your assigned questions from "The Knight's Tale" agenda (long one) or HERE blue short one with Courteous Knight attached (ONE PER GROUP)
  3. "Knight's Tale" discussion:  initial reactions,  Boethius, Boccacio poem, medieval romance genre characteristics, group work on assigned questions: roles of women, role of gods/goddesses, universal questions,  themes (free will vs. destiny, chivalric duty & honor), why the original story was called the "Story of Theseus."
  4. IF TIME: Show more of A Knight’s Tale film clip—World's First Sports Herald (1 min. 32 sec) and Rock Music in 14th century (2 min. and 4 sec) , "A Director’s Quest” (5 min. 45 sec.) and maybe, “HBO Making of Knight’s Tale” (10 min.).
  5.  

    eawgfe

     

    sfds

    HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

    1. OJ 22--"Nun's Priest's Tale" & "Pardoner's Tale" (2 sider = 10 pts)

    2. ALL BOOKS and OLD HAND-OUTS, PLEASE!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

 

FRIDAY,  May 13th, day 67

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. DUE MONDAY!  WA 21: CENSORSHIP "Thin Gruel," ,"The Miller's Tale" & "The Reeve's Tale" and SAL'S THESIS--2 sides MINIMUM (10 pts.)  TODAY YOU GOT A SALMON SET OF HAND-OUTS TO USE FOR THIS JOURNAL.  FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS ON THE COVER PAGE CAREFULLYMake sure you label everything clearly!  YOU WILL DEVOTE ABOUT 1/3 OF THE JOURNAL TO EACH OF THE THREE TOPICS.  IF YOU MISSED THIS COMPLETE PACKET, CLICK HERE.                                                                                          First, for the FRONT SIDE OF THE JOURNAL, DISCUSS CENSORSHIP--2 topics: Read "Thin Gruel" and respond.  Then, read "the Miller's Tale" and "the Reeve's Tale" and write on a topic of these 3 choices listed in on the cover of the salmon hand-out:     

     TOPIC ONE

    Contrast "The Knight's Tale" with these two tales.  Think of all the ways these tales are different as well as similar.  Which of these three are your favorites?  Does one have any more merit that the other two?  If we only had time for one of these three stories, which one would you choose?  Why?

     TOPIC TWO

    Discuss the "earthiness" or "coarseness" or "vulgarity" in these two tales.  Is there any way you could justify the "earthiness"?  Is this something seniors in high school should read?  If you were asked to defend the use of these stories in the curriculum, upon what grounds would you defend it?  Is one of these two stories tamer than the other?  If you know what I mean by the "literary canon," do you think that Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, based on what you've read so far, belongs?

     TOPIC THREE

    What "universal truths" do you see in these two stories?  Look carefully at what happens.  Are there winners?  losers?  What is it that Chaucer is trying to get us to pay attention to by reading these stories?  What lessons are there about life in these stories that even have relevance to today's readers--some five hundred (yikes!) years later?

                                                                    

    Now, for the BACK SIDE--Read Bill Salinger's master's thesis. Answer the Q's about Salinger's thesis and respond.  If you only need a copy of "Thin Gruel," click HERE.  If you only need a copy of Salinger's thesis, click HERE.   If you were absent and didn't get a copy of the yellow CT packet about the Prologue/Physiognomy/Chaucer Background, click here---> CT packet  If you need a copy of "Thin Gruel" and Mr. Salinger's essay, click HERE

    Work on Literary Theory paper! (due Wednesday , May 18th).  

    To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

    To print a copy of 2011 reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

    PLEASE Bring back ALL BOOKS  and hand-outs! Hear ye!  Hear ye! ALL-CALL FOR HAND-OUTS and BOOKS (Stack all of them up with a post-it on top with your name on it. Give us all of those signed out to you.  Do NOT give us the books one at a time!  We need them back or NO diploma!)  "Gather ye hand-outs while ye may; Old time is still a flyin'!  For all books and hand-outs not turned in, Wally and Olson will be a cryin'!  :(

     

 

 

  1. Group

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOTH OL

 
  1. G

 

 

 

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1.  

 

 

 

Hello, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight!

Green Food Day  for

SIR GAWAIN & THE GREEN KNIGHT

 

Today's Quote of the Day:

The secrets that are best kept are the ones that everyone guesses.         ~2T

R&G are Dead

Which one is which?

 

 

 

 

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

scenes from the film . . .

Newtonian Physics:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5_ayuaCzZs&feature=related

Gravity Question Court:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maI53H4Zbrs&feature=related

The funniest best of R&G:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRj_tpfrYHs&feature=fvwrel

PLAY A GAME?:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-Sx4W2cKlU&feature=related

R&G meet Hamlet:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6LO4EQcMR2Q&feature=related

There isn't any wind:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IAxeLiaHmIg&feature=related

Tom Stoppard talks with Charlie Rose:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eoSnabj-Cc4&feature=fvwrel

R & G (1990), part 1 of 14, full length movie:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDI0jIlPLGM&feature=related

Tom Roth (played Guildenstern in R&G movie--1990) interview:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vUO--q4Ys4&feature=related

 Gary Oldman (played Rosencrantz in R&G movie--1990) interview:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Wm3ihhrD7c&feature=related

Shakespeare on Film: Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead

MM's seventh week of Shakespeare on Film explores the Bard's original comedy duo


 

Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead (1990)
directed by Tom Stoppard

Tom Stoppard originally sold the screen rights to Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead, the stage comedy which made his name, soon after its 1967 premieres in the West End and on Broadway. He wrote a screenplay for MGM, then saw the project languish for twenty years until the rights were bought back and he rewrote the script and filmed it in what was then still Yugoslavia.

Film and play view the events of Hamlet entirely from the point of view of the Prince’s doomed friends as they travel to Elsinore, kick their heels ‘off stage,’ and sail to England. Tim Roth’s irritable, sarcastic Guildenstern, who’s not as clever as he thinks he is, and Gary Oldman’s garrulous, goofy Rosencrantz, who’s not as dumb as he appears, muse on why they have been summoned and how to plumb the madness of lain Glen’s mild-mannered, romantic Hamlet. Rosencrantz considers mortality in a rambling, banal equivalent of “To be, or not to be,” and keeps asking who he is, because Stoppard’s most persistent running joke—spun from the moment in Hamlet when Gertrude reverses Claudius’s “Thanks, Rosencrantz and gentle Guildenstern”—is that neither they, nor anybody else at court knows which is which.

Stoppard likened this shabby, oddly likeable pair to “a Shakespearean Laurel and Hardy or Abbott and Costello,” although their clipped, question-and-answer routines are more like the idle chatter of Vladimir and Estragon in Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot: Beautifully timed, inconsequential and better suited to stage than screen.

Conscious that theatrical dialogues might not captivate a cinema audience, Stoppard introduces and over-indulges a new gag in which Rosencrantz casually makes “scientific” discoveries, including steam power, gravity and the hamburger. Yet no matter how often he sends the pair clattering up and down flights of wooden stairs in a suspiciously deserted castle, his methods, as The Independent on Sunday noted, “still reek of the stage.”

Today's Allusion:

witch hunt

Today's Words of the Day:

mercurial

metonymy

Draconian

disdain

Today's Quotes of the Day

(from Rosencrantz & Guildenstern):

Rosencrantz: Life in a box is better than no life at all, I expect. You'd have a chance, at least. You could lie there thinking, "Well. At least I'm not dead.'

Rosencrantz: Whatever became of the moment when one first knew about death? There must have been one. A moment. In childhood. When it first occured to you that you don't go on forever. Must have been shattering. Stamped into one's memory. And yet, I can't remember it. It never occured to me at all. We must be born with an intuition of mortality. Before we know the word for it. Before we know that there are words. Out we come, bloodied and squawling, with the knowledge that for all the points of the compass, theres only one direction. And time is its only measure.

Rosencrantz: Shouldn't we be doing something... constructive?
Guildenstern: What did you have in mind? A short, blunt human pyramid?

Rosencrantz: Do you think Death could possibly be a boat?
Guildenstern: No, no, no... Death is "not." Death isn't. Take my meaning? Death is the ultimate negative. Not-being. You can't not be on a boat.
Rosencrantz: I've frequently not been on boats.
Guildenstern: No, no... What you've been is not on boats.

Rosencrantz: What are you playing at?
Guildenstern: Words. Words. They're all we have to go on.

Player King: Audiences know what they expect and that is all they are prepared to believe in.

Rosencrantz: Do you want to play questions?
Guildenstern: How do you play that?
Rosencrantz: You have to ask a question.
Guildenstern: Statement. One - Love.
Rosencrantz: Cheating.
Guildenstern: How?
Rosencrantz: I haven't started yet.
Guildenstern: Statement. Two - Love.
Rosencrantz: Are you counting that?
Guildenstern: What?
Rosencrantz: Are you counting that?
Guildenstern: Foul. No repetition. Three - Love and game.
Rosencrantz: I'm not going to play if you're going to be like that.

Rosencrantz: This place is a madhouse!

Guildenstern: All your life you live so close to truth it becomes a permanent blur in the corner of your eye. And when something nudges it into outline, it's like being ambushed by a grotesque.

Player: We do on stage the things that are supposed to happen off. Which is a kind of integrity, if you look on every exit being an entrance somewhere else.

Guildenstern:We cross our bridges when we come to them and burn them behind us, with nothing to show for our progress except a memory of the smell of smoke, and a presumption that once our eyes watered.

Player: You don't understand the humiliation of it-- to be tricked out of the single assumption which makes our existence viable-- that somebody is watching . . . . We're actors-- we're the opposite of people!

Eternity's a terrible thought. I mean, where's it all going to end?

Ambassador from England: The sight is dismal / And our affairs from England come too late. / The ears are senseless that should give us hearing, to tell him his commandment is fulfilled,/ That Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead.

 

Click here to see the Simpsons' version of Hamlet:

http://www.milkandcookies.com/link/54549/detail/

      

For more fun Shakespeare youtube links, click HERE.

The Lion King and Hamlet?  Oh, yeah!

"About suffering, they were never wrong

the old masters.  How well they understood"

Today's Quote of the Day:

"Life is a gamble, at terrible odds -- if it was a bet, you wouldn't take it."   -- Tom Stoppard

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Group check-in:
  • Weekend?
  • Debrief AP Exam
  • Gawain Group Quiz--C/C take home quizzes on Gawain parts 1-2-3-4 For a copy of this quiz, click HERE
  • GAWAIN SMALL GROUP WORK: C/C WA 33: chart of 3's:  animals, temptations, blows C/C
  •  
  1. SIR GAWAIN & THE GREEN KNIGHT--begin by going over the quiz

    For a copy of the quiz for parts 1-2, click HERE. For a copy of this quiz for parts 3-4, click HERE.)   For a copy of the Gawain packet, click HERE.

  2. INTRO TO SIR GAWAIN & THE GREEN KNIGHT--

    start COURTLY LOVE:   Discuss “courtly love."  Andreas Capellanus, "Care of a Husband,"  read the "Rules of Courtly Love" aloud (circle any still relevant today and make up 2 modern 2006 rules). 1950's Rules For a Successful Marriage and FILM CLIPS: Show clip from Knight's Tale DVD: Rules of Love—Courtly Love—2:25 min and SHOW A Mirror Has Two Faces clip here (5 min.)

  3. USE Agenda:  group A--green & deer, boar, fox, group B--why Gawain was "chosen" and why the "imperfect" human is really the perfect human, group C--C/C Arthur, Gawain, and the Green Knight, group D--how Gawain fits its medieval genre (romance), group E--most imp't info from the cover green page and the introduction, group F--pot luck!
  4. GAWAIN connections: Discuss the chart--how the animals, temptations, and the blows relate and how much Gawain was pressured to be the chivalric hero and obey the rules of courtly love in the temptations
  5. Final thoughts on Gawain: read a letter from each group (WA) or parts 3-4 journal topics WA 38,  lessons, admirable or not, GK--good or bad, ending--happy or not, significance of green and the sash, universal questions. Read quote by Jack Selzer.  If time, show 20 min. film clip of the first scene in Gawain.

 

OVERFLOW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. HEADS UP!   Bring or e-mail Wally lwallenberg@edenpr.org  a prom picture for the website (if you like)!

  2. Arcadia  Read the entire play--due TUESDAY.   Buy a copy in the school store ($12.00). Do OJ 26 Notes on the First Read-Through (questions, comments, maybe some F.I.G. questions, initial confusions, and What do you "get" upon your initial reading of Arcadia? etc.  etc.  etc.)

    Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals.   It looks like this:

  3.  

  4.  

    ARCADIA PIX:

            

    

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Start Arcadia  By TUESDAY, you must have read the entire play.   As you read the play, do OJ 26 (due TUESday) Notes on the First Read-Through (questions, comments, maybe some F.I.G. questions, initial confusions, and What do you "get" upon your initial reading of Arcadia? etc.  etc.  etc.)  To view our AP EPHS info. page on R&G are Dead, click here: http://www.edenpr.org/ephs/arcadiaweb/Rosencrantz/play_M.html

  2.  (if the link works . . . we aren't sure right now)

 

  1.  

 

  1. Share your CARPE DIEM!  EXPERIENCES! 

 

 

  1.  
    1.  OJ 22 "The Nun's Priest's Tale" & "The Pardoner's Tale" (2 sides minimum) (OLD AP ASSIGNMENT C10)

      SIDE ONE: RESPONSE TO "The Nun's Priest's Tale"

      1.   Re-read the description of the Nun's Priest in the "General Prologue" (p. 4).

      2.      Read "Nun's Priest's Tale Prologue" (pp. 139-140) and "The Nun's Priest's Tale" (pp. 140-152).

      3. MAKE AN ANIMAL CHART (rooster, hen, fox)--(TOP 1/2 of side one of the journal) Discuss what the animal traditionally symbolizes and then why the specific animal was chosen for each character (ex. What did Chanticleer have to be a rooster?  Why did Partlet have to be a hen?  Why did the animal in the barnyard have to be a fox?). 

      TEMPLATE FOR THE ANIMAL CHART

       In the left column, list all of the animals in this story.  On the right, jot down what symbolic significance these animals have traditionally been given in society. (What do you remember about the roles these animals have played in folk tales, fables,         parables, jokes, etc.?)

      ANIMAL                     TRADITIONAL SYMBOLISM                          FUNCTION IN THE TALE?

      1.  rooster

      2.  hen

      3.   fox

      4.   DREAMS AND UNIVERSAL QUESTIONS (bottom 1/2 of side one of the journal) Jot down your thought or experiences with the phenomenon of dreaming.  Do you "take stock" in dreams? Is there a dream you vividly remember?  Maybe place a sheet of paper next to you before you go to sleep one night this weekend.  When you wake up, jot down what you remember!  Can you recall any other dreams someone told you about? 

              Finally, jot down what you think are the universal questions raised in this story.

        SIDE TWO: RESPONSE TO "The Pardoner's Tale"

      1.        Review the description of the pardoner in the "General Prologue" (p. 13-14).

      2.        Read "The Pardoner's Tale Prologue" (p. 286-289) and "The Pardoner's Tale." (pp. 290-299.)

      3.        Discuss the universal question that arise in this tale.  What does it mean when someone advocates that  "to talk the talk, you must also walk the walk."   Feel free to poll a few people on their ideas about this concept.  What does it mean to you?   How does it relate to the pardoner?  Are there any ways at all you might see the pardoner as a positive character worth redemption?

  1.  

  2. WA 23 Meet the Wife of Bath and "GENDER ROLES" (OLD ASSIGNMENT C7:  ) 

    1.        Review the description of the Wife of Bath in the "General Prologue" (pp. 9-10).

    2.        Read "The Wife of Bath's Prologue" (pp. 153-169--YES!  IT'S LONG!  DON'T SKIP IT!  IT'S ALMOST MORE IMPORTANT THAN THE TALE ITSELF.)  Dame Alice is often called the "first feminist character in literature."  What do you think of that?  What do you think of her?   Is she, as some critics call her, "a militant suffragist rampant for her rights who may lose her cause by exaggeration"?

    3.        Read "The Wife of Bath's Tale" (pp. 169-176).  Pay special attention to pp. 174-176! 

    4.     Do WA 23 Meet the Wife of Bath and "GENDER ROLES"

       side ONE: RESPONSE TO THE TALE  Comment on the UNIVERSAL QUESTIONS brought up in this tale and/or its prologue.  HERE ARE SOME OTHER IDEAS FOR DISCUSSION:  What is it that women supposedly desire most?  What three topics does the old woman take up the last few pages from the end?  Why are these so critical?  Also, what's up with the ending?  Was there really a magic transformation?  What do you (or most people presumably) want to believe?

         side TWO: RESPONSE TO 3 Gender Roles Articles  Using the packets of articles you got in class today, comment on something from each color of articles--pink, blue, and yellowIf you need copies of the articles, click a few of each COLOR and read!  PINK article 1, PINK article 2, PINK article 3, PINK article 4, PINK article 5, PINK article 6, PINK article 7, PINK article 8, PINK article 9, PINK article 10, PINK article 11, BLUE article 1, BLUE article 2, BLUE article 3, BLUE article 4, BLUE article 5, BLUE article 6, BLUE article 7, BLUE article 8 , YELLOW article 1, YELLOW article 2, YELLOW article 3, YELLOW article 4, YELLOW article 5. 

     

  3.  OJ 23 Partner Poem--due Wednesday!  (OLD ASSIGNMENT C9)

    After hearing/reading these poems, "Lessons," "Two Women," and "Local Sensibilities," choose one of

    these as a template for a your own poem inspired by one of these. 

    Your poem need not be as long as the original, but should have enough "meat" OR "substance" to get

    your point across to your audience. Click HERE if you need a copy of the three poems. 

     NOTE:   You have the option of doing this completely

    on your own, but for more fun you may choose a partner (or trio--no more!) with whom you

    will collaborate and write (as well as "perform") the poem together.  If you do this with a partner,

    BOTH of you need a copy in your journal!

     NOTE:  PERFORMANCE" DATE OF THE POEMS IS SET FOR WEDNESDAY NEXT WEEK!

    Mof M PREP WORK:  --Read the hand-out carefully.  Start thinking of themes for your groups.  Start thinking about what role YOU would like to play--scriptwriter, costume designer, actor, techie, etc.  If you are the designated leader(s), read the Mof M agenda carefully and be ready to lead the group at Friday's MofM meeting #1!

     

  4. PREP WORK FOR OUR LAST PROJECT: Meeting of the Minds--Meeting #2 NEXT FRIDAY!

  5.    GROUPS1. Hearty Tale, 2. Hamlet Falls Apart, 3. Prideful Meany  THE PRELIMINARY MofM SCRIPT IS DUE TUESDAY, June 1st!!!!   Work on your part in our final AP Lit. Project called Meeting of the Minds! Better yet--CLICK HERE to print out the sheet outlining the project.  Be ready ASAP to sign-up for your role!  There will be approximately 3 30 minute group meetings DURING CLASS.  The rest of the meeting time needs to take place after class if needed.  This means that your group members must divide up the work and trust that each group member does his or her part to prepare well for group meetings.  There will be a minimum of 8 speaking roles, 2-3 script writers, 2-3 techies (stage manager, lights, music, props, costumes, etc.)  The first organizational group meeting  was last week.  By the second group meeting, TUESDAY, JUNE 1st, the script should be in rough draft form and lots of individual brainstorming on the theme done. Meeting #3 is FRIDAY, June 4th!  and Meeting #4 DRESS REHEARSAL is , Monday, June 7th.  The first group will "perform" on Tuesday, June 8th, and the next two will be on Wednesday, June 9th.

     

  6. WARNING!!! ALL JOURNALS DUE WEEK ON NEXT FriDAY How are your journals coming?  You will turn in the WHOLE batch on  FRIDAY!  For a current (and FINAL!) master list of journals WITH LINKS TO THE DOCUMENTS EACH JOURNAL IS BASED ON, click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals Print out this list to turn in with all your WA's (to Wally) and OJ's (to Olson).  Be sure to pre-score your journals tranferring any scores on the journals already onto the grading sheet. Note that there are questions to answer (worth 5 points) on your journaling experience!  Put each set of journals in its own folder, please!   CLICK HERE WA 2010 FOR THE BEST PRINTABLE PDF FORM OF THE WA's OR FOR THE WORD DOCUMENT WA LIST, click HERE WA WORD 2010 CLICK HERE OJ 2010 FOR THE BEST PRINTABLE PDF FORM OF THE OJ's OR HERE OJ WORD 2010
  7.  

  8. Hear ye!  Hear ye! ALL-CALL FOR HAND-OUTS and BOOKS (Stack all of them up with a post-it on top with your name on it. Give us all of those signed out to you.  Do NOT give us the books one at a time!  We need them back or NO diploma!)  "Gather ye hand-outs while ye may; Old time is still a flyin'!  For all books and hand-outs not turned in, Wally and Olson will be a cryin'!  :(

    GENDER ROLES

    What do Men Want?

    What do Women Want?

    Click HERE FOR MORE IDEAS!

 

  1. WARNING!!! ALL JOURNALS DUE WEEK ON NEXT FriDAY How are your journals coming?  You will turn in the WHOLE batch on  FRIDAY!  For a current (and FINAL!) master list of journals WITH LINKS TO THE DOCUMENTS EACH JOURNAL IS BASED ON, click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals Print out this list to turn in with all your WA's (to Wally) and OJ's (to Olson).  Be sure to pre-score your journals tranferring any scores on the journals already onto the grading sheet. Note that there are questions to answer (worth 5 points) on your journaling experience!  Put each set of journals in its own folder, please!   CLICK HERE WA 2010 FOR THE BEST PRINTABLE PDF FORM OF THE WA's OR FOR THE WORD DOCUMENT WA LIST, click HERE WA WORD 2010 CLICK HERE OJ 2010 FOR THE BEST PRINTABLE PDF FORM OF THE OJ's OR HERE OJ WORD 2010
  2. Start working on the CT paper (remember NO BUYBACKS!!!) (technical aspects graded by avg. errors per page!) Read the purple packet outlining the CT paper  For a copy of this packet, click HERE.  It's due Wednesday, June 2. To see a copy of the packet and/or print off the grading sheet, click HERE.  Click HERE for a copy of brainstormed IDEAS FOR MEETING PLACES.
  3. BRING YOUR BOOKS and old hand-outs BACK ASAP!  Remember especially to bring back the Poetry Packet, Frankenstein Packet, Beowulf Packets, Hamlet packets--all that Jazz!

     

 

 

  1. Start familiarizing yourself with the CT paper (remember NO BUYBACKS!!!) (technical aspects graded by avg. errors per page!) Read the purple packet outlining the CT paper  For a copy of this packet, click HERE.  It's due Wednesday, June 2. To see a copy of the packet and/or print off the grading sheet, click HERE.  Click HERE for a copy of brainstormed IDEAS FOR MEETING PLACES.

  2.  

    PREP WORK FOR OUR LAST PROJECT: Meeting of the Minds--Meeting #2 NEXT FRIDAY!

  3.    GROUPS1. Hearty Tale, 2. Hamlet Falls Apart, 3. Prideful Meany  Read carefully through the hand-out outlining our final AP Lit. Project called Meeting of the Minds! Better yet--CLICK HERE to print out the sheet outlining the project.  Be ready ASAP to sign-up for your role.  Start thinking of universal questions/themes for your groups.  Start thinking about what role YOU would like to play--scriptwriter, costume designer, actor, techie, etc.  The first major meeting is Friday, but each day during group check-in, ideas should be gathered!  Groups = Tale of the Heart, Hamlet Falls Apart, and Prideful Meany.  There will be approximately 3 30 minute group meetings DURING CLASS.  The rest of the meeting time needs to take place after class if needed.  This means that your group members must divide up the work and trust that each group member does his or her part to prepare well for group meetings.  There will be a minimum of 8 speaking roles, 2-3 script writers, 2-3 techies (stage manager, lights, music, props, costumes, etc.)  The first organizational group meeting  was last week.  By the second group meeting, TUESDAY, JUNE 1st, the script should be in rough draft form and lots of individual brainstorming on the theme done. Meeting #3 is FRIDAY, June 4th!  and Meeting #4 DRESS REHEARSAL is , Monday, June 7th.  The first group will "perform" on Tuesday, June 8th, and the next two will be on Wednesday, June 9th. 

  1. Start familiarizing yourself with the CT paper (remember NO BUYBACKS!!!) (technical aspects graded by avg. errors per page!) Read the purple packet outlining the CT paper  For a copy of this packet, click HERE.  It's due Wednesday, June 2. To see a copy of the packet and/or print off the grading sheet, click HERE.  Click HERE for a copy of brainstormed IDEAS FOR MEETING PLACES.      
  2. Mof M Leader PREP WORK:  --If you are the designated leader(s), read the Mof M agenda carefully and be ready to lead the group in Friday's MofM meeting #1!
  3. PREP WORK FOR OUR LAST PROJECT: Meeting of the Minds--Meeting #2 NEXT FRIDAY!

  4.    GROUPS1. Hearty Tale, 2. Hamlet Falls Apart, 3. Prideful Meany

    THE PRELIMINARY MofM SCRIPT IS DUE TUESDAY, June 1st!!!!   Read carefully through the hand-out outlining our final AP Lit. Project called Meeting of the Minds! Better yet--CLICK HERE to print out the sheet outlining the project.  Be ready ASAP to sign-up for your role!  There will be approximately 3 30 minute group meetings DURING CLASS.  The rest of the meeting time needs to take place after class if needed.  This means that your group members must divide up the work and trust that each group member does his or her part to prepare well for group meetings.  There will be a minimum of 8 speaking roles, 2-3 script writers, 2-3 techies (stage manager, lights, music, props, costumes, etc.)  The first organizational group meeting  was last week.  By the second group meeting, TUESDAY, JUNE 1st, the script should be in rough draft form and lots of individual brainstorming on the theme done. Meeting #3 is FRIDAY, June 4th!  and Meeting #4 DRESS REHEARSAL is , Monday, June 7th.  The first group will "perform" on Tuesday, June 8th, and the next two will be on Wednesday, June 9th.

  1. PREP WORK FOR OUR LAST PROJECT: Meeting of the Minds--Meeting #2 NEXT FRIDAY!

  2.    GROUPS1. Hearty Tale, 2. Hamlet Falls Apart, 3. Prideful Meany

    THE PRELIMINARY MofM SCRIPT IS DUE TUESDAY, June 1st!!!!   Read carefully through the hand-out outlining our final AP Lit. Project called Meeting of the Minds! Better yet--CLICK HERE to print out the sheet outlining the project.  Be ready ASAP to sign-up for your role!  There will be approximately 3 30 minute group meetings DURING CLASS.  The rest of the meeting time needs to take place after class if needed.  This means that your group members must divide up the work and trust that each group member does his or her part to prepare well for group meetings.  There will be a minimum of 8 speaking roles, 2-3 script writers, 2-3 techies (stage manager, lights, music, props, costumes, etc.)  The first organizational group meeting  was last week.  By the second group meeting, TUESDAY, JUNE 1st, the script should be in rough draft form and lots of individual brainstorming on the theme done. Meeting #3 is FRIDAY, June 4th!  and Meeting #4 DRESS REHEARSAL is , Monday, June 7th.  The first group will "perform" on Tuesday, June 8th, and the next two will be on Wednesday, June 9th.

Be ready for your MofM meeting tomorrow! E-mail each other on your progress as the week goes on!  Next group meeting is TUESDAY, JUNE 1st when !  a preliminary script is due!  Enough copies run for everyone, and each person's individual part highlighted! Work on Meeting of the Minds! Set up a FACEBOOK GROUP or e-mail each other on your progress as the week goes on! 

If you are the designated leader(s), read the Mof M agenda carefully and be ready to lead the group in Friday's MofM meeting #1!

 

WARNING!!! ALL JOURNALS DUE next week on FriDAY How are your journals coming?  You will turn in the WHOLE batch on  FRIDAY!  For a current (and FINAL!) master list of journals WITH LINKS TO THE DOCUMENTS EACH JOURNAL IS BASED ON, click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals Print out this list to turn in with all your WA's (to Wally) and OJ's (to Olson).  Be sure to pre-score your journals tranferring any scores on the journals already onto the grading sheet. Note that there are questions to answer (worth 5 points) on your journaling experience!  Put each set of journals in its own folder, please!   CLICK HERE WA 2010 FOR THE BEST PRINTABLE PDF FORM OF THE WA's OR FOR THE WORD DOCUMENT WA LIST, click HERE WA WORD 2010 CLICK HERE OJ 2010 FOR THE BEST PRINTABLE PDF FORM OF THE OJ's OR HERE OJ WORD 2010

 

 

 

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

Don't know the difference between "who" vs. "whom"?  Neither does Michael from The Office Check out this The Office episode:

http://www.nbc.com/The_Office/video/episodes.shtml#vid=169097&tin=1248.049&tou=1320.252&plt=lf

 

Start familiarizing yourself with the CT paper (remember NO BUYBACKS!!!) (technical aspects graded by avg. errors per page!) Read the purple packet outlining the CT paper  For a copy of this packet, click HERE.  It's due Wednesday, June 2. To see a copy of the packet and/or print off the grading sheet, click HERE.  Click HERE for a copy of brainstormed IDEAS FOR MEETING PLACES.

DUE FRIDAY! GAWAIN PARTS 1-2: ASSIGNMENT  G1

1.         Read the front page of the Sir Gawain packet.          IF YOU WERE ABSENT TODAY,  click HERE for a copy of the Gawain packet.

2.         Read the Introduction to Gawain -- see the white pages in the Gawain Packet right before the text of the poem    

3.         Read parts 1 and 2 (from pp. 202-225 in the Norton Anthology, 6th ed.).    BIG HINT!  You may want to read the poem aloud!

4.          Do WA 17  Some Preliminary Thoughts on Gawain parts 1 – 2

A.      After you have read the text,  think about these ideas :

a.        the significance/associations of the color green

b.       why Gawain was chosen for this "quest"

c.        how the "imperfect human is really the perfect human"

d.       comparisons and contrast between these three characters: Arthur, Sir Gawain, the Green Knight

e.        the symbolic significance/associations that are conjured up in your mind with the following animals:  a deer, a boar, a fox.  You may have been given a chart in which to write down these animal associations.  Jot down your ideas in the first column the chart

f.         how does Gawain qualify as a representative "medieval romance"

g.       what similarities and differences do you see between Beowulf and Gawain and the Green Knight.

B.       For the journal,  jot down your ideas on these:  

o        •reading the introduction,

o        •what happens in parts 1 and 2,

o        •at least three of the ideas listed above (a-g)

5.           Be prepared for a quiz  on the Intro., the information in the hand-out, & Gawain parts 1 and 2.

 

 

  1. Bring GREEN TREATS for FHGFY! -- Fantastic Healthy (?) Green Food Friday!
  2. DUE FRIDAY! GAWAIN PARTS 1-2: ASSIGNMENT  G1

    1.         Read the front page of the Sir Gawain packet.          IF YOU WERE ABSENT TODAY,  click HERE for a copy of the Gawain packet.

    2.         Read the Introduction to Gawain -- see the white pages in the Gawain Packet right before the text of the poem      Be prepared for a quiz on the Intro., the information in the hand-out, & Gawain parts 1 and 2.

    3.         Read parts 1 and 2 (from pp. 202-225 in the Norton Anthology, 6th ed.).    BIG HINT!  You may want to read the poem aloud!  Be prepared for a quiz on the Intro., the information in the hand-out, & Gawain parts 1 and 2.

    4.          Do WA 17  Some Preliminary Thoughts on Gawain parts 1 – 2

    A.      After you have read the text,  think about these ideas :

    a.        the significance/associations of the color green

    b.       why Gawain was chosen for this "quest"

    c.        how the "imperfect human is really the perfect human"

    d.       comparisons and contrast between these three characters: Arthur, Sir Gawain, the Green Knight

    e.        the symbolic significance/associations that are conjured up in your mind with the following animals:  a deer, a boar, a fox.  You may have been given a chart in which to write down these animal associations.  Jot down your ideas in the first column the chart

    f.         how does Gawain qualify as a representative "medieval romance"

    g.       what similarities and differences do you see between Beowulf and Gawain and the Green Knight.

    5.           Be prepared for a quiz on the Intro., the information in the hand-out, & Gawain parts 1 and 2.

DUE MONDAY! GAWAIN PARTS 3-4: ASSIGNMENT  G2 and G3 (depending on your NOVEL GROUP)

1.  Read parts 3 and 4. (pp. 258-288 in the Norton Anthology, 5th ed. Or pp. 225-254 in the Norton Anthology, 6th ed.). BIG HINT!  You may want to read the poem aloud!  Be prepared for a quiz on the Intro., the information in the hand-out, & Gawain parts 1 and 2.

2.  Fill out the Comparison / Contrast Chart  of the 3 Animals/Hunts/Temptations/Blows.  Click HERE for a copy of the chart. For a copy of the Gawain packet, click HERE.

After all the boxes are filled, look for ways the columns associate with each other.

a.        In the first column in the boxes under the word "Animals," jot down what symbolic significances/associations are conjured up in your mind with these animals:  a deer, a boar, a fox.

b.       In the second column in the boxes under the word "Bercilak's hunt," jot down what characterizes each hunt (how it is gone about, what methods are used, the results, etc.).

c.        In the third column in the boxes under the word "temptations," jot down what characterizes each of the three temptation experiences.  Look at both the strategies/reactions/results in terms of Sir Gawain and the Lady.

d.       In the fourth column in the boxes under the word "blows," jot down what characterizes each confrontation between Gawain and the Green Knight.

3.         Do WA 18 “Gawain Closure Topics”  (a minimum of one side – 5 pts.)

              Do the journal topic assigned to your NOVEL GROUP!

 Analytic Journal Entry on Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

 

Devote at least a page to your topic or whatever it takes to fully explore the topic.  Choose one of the two topics described below:

 GROUP A FRANKENSTEIN CHOICES:

 

 A1          Would Sir Gawain be considered a hero, even after his “mistake”?

 

  A2         Either agree or disagree.  Gawain came through the challenge successfully.  Give support.

 

GROUP B BEOWULF CHOICES:

 B1          If Gawain was reincarnated, what would we think of today’s society or today’s society think of him?  Is he admirable?

B2           Discuss why Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is considered by many to epitomize the medieval romance.

 GROUP C TALE OF TWO CITIES CHOICES:

C1           How does Gawain’s fate and success/lack of success reflect on the Knights of the Round Table?

C2           How does Sir Gawain and the Green Knight reflect Christian values?

GROUP D HAMLET CHOICES:

D1           Is dishonor worse than death in medieval society?  Is this still reflected in society today?

D2           Why do you think women are considered to be the “root of all evil” in Sir Gawain?  How does this relate to courtly love and its rules?

 GROUP E THINGS FALL APART CHOICES:

 

E1            What is so important about the sash?  Why does Gawain wear it forever?  What does this symbolize?  How does it differ from the nick on the neck?

E2            Is this a happy or unhappy ending?  Justify your answer.

___________________________________________________________________________________A

WA 18 TOPICS FOR THE OTHER GROUPS ARCADIA, OWEN MEANY AND HEART OF DARKNESS

Note!  You can choose whichever character's letter (characters are Arthur, Gawain, Morgan, or Felicia) you want to write!

 ASSIGNMENT G3: THE GREEN LETTERS

For this journal, you are to write a letter based on SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT.

 This is ALSO  WA# 18: _______________'s  (name of character writing letter)  Letter

GROUPS ARCADIA, OWEN MEANY AND HEART OF DARKNESS:  Choose one of the four scenarios below upon which to base a letter you will write.  Make sure you defend your viewpoint using examples (quotations are also welcome!) from the text.  Please keep plot summary to a minimum.  As always, your entry (the letter) must be a minimum of one page.  Circle the letter you choose, and write its title (“Arthur’s Letter,” for example) at the top of your page.

For Arthur's and Gawain's letters, base your viewpoint on this quote:

"Gawain is the ideal man because he demonstrates that he  cannot be the ideal--he's a man."        

1.         Arthur’s letter

Sir Cameron is a young knight currently studying in France.  He is one of Arthur's favorites and most promising knights.  Arthur knows that word has reached him about Sir Gawain's adventure with the Green Knight, and he also knows that Sir Cameron is very eager to learn to live his life according to the code of chivalry.  Arthur thinks he can learn a valuable lesson from Gawain's adventure and perhaps see Gawain as somewhat of a model.  Using the philosophy in the quote, write the letter Arthur might send to Sir Cameron to convince him of Gawain's success.  Start out your letter, “Dear Sir Cameron.”

2.         Gawain’s letter

Gawain has been home a few months now and has had time to reflect on his adventure with the Green Knight.  He still feels he has failed both himself and Arthur's court.  He knows of Arthur's young and promising favorite, Sir Cameron. He genuinely likes Sir Cameron and feels he may be the key to the future of Camelot and the perpetuation of the code of chivalry.  He decides to write a letter to his young friend hoping to convince him not to make the same mistakes he made and to not view his life as ideal.  Refuting the philosophy of the quote, write the letter Gawain might send to Sir Cameron to convince him that he would be wrong in seeing the adventure of the Green Knight as successful.  Start out your letter, “Dear Sir Cameron.”

For Morgan's and Felicia's letters, base your viewpoint on this quote: 

  1. "Gawain ...starts out as the perfect knight and moves downward ending as an imperfect ‘fol chevalier’ (chivalric fool or foolish gentleman) who is the object of laughter rather than admiration.”  

    3.         Morgan’s letter

    Morgan LeFay is convinced that her scheme was successful in showing the weakness and failure of Gawain and Arthur’s court.  She decides to write a letter to her cousin Felicia convincing her that she has triumphed and Gawain has ultimately fallen.  Using the philosophy of the quotation, write the letter from Morgan to Felicia.  Start out your letter, “Dear Felicia.”

    4.         Felicia’s letter

    Felicia has received the letter Morgan has written to her as described in question 3.  However, she believes Morgan is wrong and that her conclusion about Gawain ending up a fool and an object of ridicule rather than admiration is ludicrous.  She knows the story well and decides to write a letter back to Morgan convincing her that Gawain did not start out perfectly or move downward to end up the way the quote described.  Refuting the philosophy of the quote, write the return letter from Felicia to Morgan.  Start out your letter, “Dear Morgan.”

     

  2. A Glossary of Literary TermsPoetic Device Assignment (old ASSIGNMENT L #1).  If you missed class or are unaware of what terms you are assigned, click HERE to see what your assigned term(s)are.  Define your assigned Poetry Term(s) using TWO DIFFERENT SOURCES other than a generic dictionary and give several examples of each term. If you have many terms, one example will suffice. You may use the black textbook (LBT) for one of your definitions of your assigned terms, but you must find another CREDIBLE (not a generic dictionary like Webster's) source (it can be an online source like those linked below) for your other definition.  Look for literary terms dictionaries or check out websites such as the following:                  http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88/poetic-terms.html or  http://www.k-state.edu/english/baker/english320/cc.htm  or http://ethnicity.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Terms/  or http://www.northern.edu/hastingw/terms.htm   or  http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_I.html 

  3. WA 10: POEMS! POEMS! POEMS!  (3 topics over a minimum of 2 sides)  1. SHARE YOUR PERSONAL THOUGHTS/EXPERIENCES REGARDING POETRY and STUDYING POETRY.   2.  Skim through the blue Poetry Packet (PP) pp. OP-1 to OP-18.  CLICK HERE for a copy of the BLUE Poetry Packet if you didn't get it in class.  Read what strikes you.  Comment on what you found interesting in these pages.  If you are reacting to a particular poem, be sure to identify its title/poet. 3. Check out the websites linked below and comment on what you found interesting. Be sure to jot down the URL and the title/description of the site on which you are commenting!    Click HERE to see WALLY'S COOL POETRY LINKS! 

  4.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below are some pictures (bad quality--Sorry!  They're over 30 years old) of Wally in 1974 in Uppsala Sweden meeting Carl Gustaf, King of Sweden, at Uppsala Castle

IT WAS SERENDIPITY!!!!