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Click  HERE for the CLASS OF 2011 PHOTO GALLERY.

Click the following website for the WEB ALBUM GALLERY:

https://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011APLitClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIre876Uxtrs2wE#

 

 

WEEK 12a: May 2-6, 2011

AP EXAM WEEK #1

Lit. Exam 8:00 Thursday

HEADS UP!  In reviewing for the AP LIT EXAM, check these out! 

FOR A COPY OF AP LIT POETRY TERMS PACKET, CLICK HERE

For a great hand-out to review as you think about explicating the poetry on the AP Lit. Exam, click HERE

Click HERE for the Literary Time Periods Time line/Works Most Frequently Appearing on the AP Open-ended Essay.

Tips on How to Approach the AP Lit. Essay on Poetry

Unlocking a poem's meaning-two parts: the "What"- (central purpose) and the "How"- (stylistic devices employed to enhance meaning)  

a. Annotate copiously as you read the first time for poem's meaning (central purpose) and stylistic devices.

b. Determine poem's central purpose- there is always a deeper meaning unrelated to plot in great poetry. For example, what universal comment is the poet making about life, mankind, or the human condition?  Plato
believed that "Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history."  What vital truth has the poet discovered? How does the speaker feel (his attitude) about his subject?
  
c. Re-read the poem, once again noting stylistic devices. You should be analyzing and determining the poem's tone/s, and contemplating the irony within the poem-it will be there. Don't be afraid to take risks;
readers reward the unique and insightful thinker.
  
d. Locating shifts IS essential- look for transitions in the poem: but, therefore, since, although, etc.  Also, use clear transitions in your essay.  These help the reader follow the flow of your essay.

Keep your paragraphs organized; don't digress.
  
e. Make a very brief plan before you write: cluster, list, etc.
  
f. Begin to write.  Get to the point.  Cite title, poet, and central purpose, perhaps making a philosophical comment as you introduce your thesis. Try to make a strong first impression.
  
g. Write to express, not impress. Inflated writing seldom gets the
top scores.
  
h. Use all your time, approaching the poem chronologically-line by line, or stanza by stanza- if you are comfortable with that; if not, you might approach your analysis through the different elements: irony, tone,
alliteration, metaphors, etc.
  
i. Before you end your essay, revisit the title and its implications,making sure you include a reference to it in your essay.
  
j. Pay careful attention to the first and last two lines of the poem.
  
k. Save a minute or two to proofread your essay; if you cannot read it, the readers won't be able to either!
  
l. Make sure you have put the title in quotation marks and that you have included the poet's name.
  
m. Do not confuse the poet with the speaker. They will almost always be different and you will run into trouble if you do.
    
                                                        
Other Points to Remember

1.     Always refer to the poet or speaker by last name only-never use first name only.

2.     Give support and more support.  Use the poem!

3.     Use ellipsis dots to shorten a long quote, and keep quotations from the poem as short as possible.  One word is often enough.  The readers have the poem in front of them; a full sentence is nearly always too much
by far.

4.     When citing an element, don't just mention it.  Explain how it functions

5.     Avoid "laundry lists" of elements that go nowhere.

6.     When referring to a word as a word, underline it or put quotes around it. ("Nothing" is repeated frequently)

7.     Place the end punctuation mark inside the quotation.

8.     If you finish writing before time is up, DON'T.  You should be using every single minute.  

9.     Read your response backward; this allows you to catch mistakes because you are forced to look at each word.

10.                         Check spelling as best as you can.

11.                         Avoid giving your essay a title.

12.                         Do not bother with line numbers; they are not necessary in a timed writing, and we do not look at them.

13.                         Underline titles of long works; use quotation marks around titles of shorter works.  Poems are put in quotation marks!

14.                         Do NOT write in pencil.

15.                         Do not use white out; we understand that you are writing a rough draft.

16.                         Don't define terms; the readers are experienced AP teachers and college professors.

Fifty Fun Things to do during an AP Exam

                                                   by Roy Deering, AP Instructor in Oklahoma

NOTE:  You should not attempt these things during an actual exam. The following is meant for entertainment purposes only.

1. Bring a pillow. Fall asleep (or pretend to) until the last 15 minutes. Wake up, say "oh geez, better get cracking" and do some gibberish work. Turn it in a few minutes early.

2. Get a copy of the exam, run out screaming "Andre, Andre, I've got the secret documents!!"

3. If it is a math/science exam, answer in essay form. If it is long answer/essay form, answer with numbers and symbols. Be creative. Use the integral symbol.

4. Make paper airplanes out of the exam. Aim them at the instructor's left nostril.

5. Talk the entire way through the exam. Read questions aloud, debate your answers with yourself out loud. If asked to stop, yell out, "I'm so sure you can hear me thinking. " Then start talking about what a jerk the instructor is.

6. Bring cheerleaders.

7. Walk in, get the exam, sit down. About five minutes into it, loudly say to the instructor, "I don't understand any of this. I've been to every lecture all semester long! What's the deal? And who are you? Where's the regular guy?"

8. Bring a Game Boy (or today’s popular equivalent). Play with the volume at max level.

9. On the answer sheet (book, whatever) find a new, interesting way to refuse to answer every question. For example: I refuse to answer this question on the grounds that it conflicts with my religious beliefs. Be creative.

10. Bring pets.

11. Run into the exam room looking about frantically. Breathe a sigh of relief. Go to the instructor, say "They've found me, I have to leave the country" and run off.

12. Fifteen minutes into the exam, stand up, rip up all the papers into very small pieces, throw them into the air and yell out "Merry Christmas. "If you're really daring, ask for another copy of the exam. Say you lost the first one. Repeat this process every fifteen minutes.

13. Do the exam with crayons, paint, or fluorescent markers.

14. Come into the exam wearing slippers, a bathrobe, a towel on your head, and nothing else.

15. Come down with a BAD case of Turet's Syndrome during the exam. Be as vulgar as possible.

16. Do the entire exam in another language. If you don't know one, make one up! For math/science exams, try using Roman numerals.

17. Bring things to throw at the instructor when s/he's not looking. Blame it on the person nearest to you.

18. As soon as the instructor hands you the exam, eat it.

19. Walk into the exam with an entourage. Claim you are going to be taping your next video during the exam. Try to get the instructor to let them stay, be persuasive. Tell the instructor to expect a percentage of the profits if they are allowed to stay.

20. Every five minutes, stand up, collect all your things, move to another seat, continue with the exam.

21. Turn in the exam approximately 30 minutes into it. As you walk out, start commenting on how easy it was.

22. Do the entire exam as if it was multiple choice and true/false. If it is a multiple choice exam, spell out interesting things (DCCAB. BABE. etc. . ).

23. Bring a black marker. Return the exam with all questions and answers completely blacked out.

24. Get the exam. Twenty minutes into it, throw your papers down violently, scream out "Forget this!" and walk out triumphantly.

25. Arrange a protest before the exam starts (i. e. Threaten the instructor that whether or not everyone's done, they are all leaving after one hour to go drink)

26. Text.

27. Every now and then, clap twice rapidly. If the instructor asks why, tell him/her in a very derogatory tone, "The light bulb that goes on above my head when I get an idea is hooked up to a clapper. DUH!"

28. Comment on how sexy the instructor is looking that day.

29. Come to the exam wearing a black cloak. After about 30 minutes, put on a white mask and start yelling "I'm here, the phantom of the opera" until they drag you away.

30. Go to an exam for a class you have no clue about, where you know the class is very small, and the instructor would recognize you if you belonged. Claim that you have been to every lecture. Fight for your right to take the exam.

31. Upon receiving the exam, look it over, while laughing loudly, say, "You don't really expect me to waste my time on this drivel? Days of our Lives is on!!!"

32. Bring a water pistol with you.

33. From the moment the exam begins, hum the theme to Jeopardy. Ignore the instructor's requests for you to stop. When they finally get you to leave one way or another, begin whistling the theme to the Bridge on the River Kwai.

34. Start a brawl in the middle of the exam.

35. If the exam is math/science related, make up the longest proofs you could possibly think of. Get pi and imaginary numbers into most equations. If it is a written exam, relate everything to your own life story.

36. Come in wearing a full knight's outfit, complete with sword and shield.

37. Bring a friend to give you a back massage the entire way through the exam. Insist this person is needed, because you have bad circulation.

38. When you walk in, complain about the heat.


39.  Bring cheat sheets for another class (make sure this is obvious. . . like history notes for a calculus exam. . . otherwise you're not just failing, you're getting kicked out too) and staple them to the exam, with the comment "Please use the attached notes for references as you see fit. "


40. After you get the exam, call the instructor over, point to any question, ask for the answer. Try to work it out of him/her.

41. One word: Wrestlemania.

42. Bring balloons, blow them up, start throwing them around like they do before concerts start.

43. Try to get people in the room to do the wave.

44. Play frisbee with a friend at the other side of the room.

45. Bring one pencil with a very sharp point. Break the point off your paper. Sharpen the pencil. Repeat this process for one hour.

46. Get deliveries of candy, flowers, balloons, telegrams, etc. sent to you every few minutes throughout the exam.

47. During the exam, take apart everything around you. Desks, chairs, anything you can reach.

48. Complete the exam with everything you write being backwards at a 90 degree angle.

49. Bring a musical instrument with you, play various tunes. If you are asked to stop, say, "It helps me think. " Bring a copy of the Student Handbook with you, challenging the instructor to find the section on musical instruments during finals. Don't forget to use the phrase "Told you so."

50. Answer the exam with the "Top Ten Reasons Why Professor xxxx is a Terrible Teacher
"

LITERARY THEORY PAPER!

    

  Literary Theory paper is due

Wednesday , May 18th.  

To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE.  To print a copy of 2011 reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

Click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  

Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals.

Click HERE to go automatically to the yellow HW packet!

Click HERE for the Literary Time Periods Time line/Works Most Frequently Appearing on the AP Open-ended Essay.

Click HERE for a WORD document or HERE for a pdf. copy of the MAJOR WORKS DATA SHEET  (you will need to have 5 MAJOR WORKS DATA SHEETS by the time the AP Lit Exam comes along).  You received one "free" sheet in class.  You will need to print out the others.

To print more allusion and vocab sheets, click HERE!

Need something  to read or see? Click HERE for last year's OLES' LIST OF "MOST IMPORTANT BOOKS and MOVIES." How about reading or watching a movie suggested by our EPHS STAFF?  Click on this link: http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/english/favorite_books_movies.pdf

 

EPHS ENGLISH DEPARTMENT SURVIVAL MANUAL  (rev. 11.22.09)

To print off the entire manual half size or full size or to use the manual online in "navigational mode," go to the EPHS English department home page and click on the buttons to the left of the screen:

http://ephs.edenpr.org/index.php?option=com_qcontacts&view=category&catid=76&Itemid=123

click HERE for the COVER with table of contents  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the GRS (Grammar Rules Summary) section--yellow

click HERE for the MSF (Manuscript Formatting Rules) section--yellow

click HERE for the PDQ (Parenthetical Documentation and Quotes) section--green  (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) section--pink (rev. 11.22.09)

click HERE for the WC (Works Cited) SHORT FORM--pink

 

Buybacks 

Notes: 1.  Record your results on the yellow and pink sheets in your folder.   By the way, Mr. Olson doesn't like to use the boxes at the end of the grading sheet.  He prefers that you read his comments in the margins to find the positives and suggestions.  You must summarize these in the pink boxes and write a goal for the next paper.  Then, record your number of errors in Lit. Analysis Paper column on the yellow technical sheet.) 2.   Be sure to follow directions! There will be a lot less "mercy" for not doing correcting the error correctly this time.   3.  YOU ARE REQUIRED TO WRITE OUT THE WHOLE SENTENCE THAT HAS THE ERROR(S).  DO NOT USE ELLIPSES!  4.  Make sure you do not make ANY NEW ERRORS.  If two or more errors occur in the same sentence, follow the specific directions on how to correct them all together.  5.   TURN BUYBACKS IN ON TIME!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  5.  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

 If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE. (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample (NOT PERFECT) of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

NOTE!  You may organize your buybacks by type of error or chronologically as they appear in your paper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DATE In-Class plan Homework (due next day almost always):
MONDAY, May 2nd day 58

  FINISH  

LITERARY THEORY BACKGROUND

an interesting link to feminist theory websites: 

http://vos.ucsb.edu/browse.asp?id=2828

Today's allusion:

Kafkaesque

Today's Words of the Day:

mundane

audacious

 

Alexander Pope

Today's Quotes of the Day:

"We think our fathers fools so wise we grow

Our wiser sons no doubt will think us so"

Alexander Pope

AND

 "Never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee!"

~John Donne  

Wally's first AP Lit Class 1977

Can you find Mr. McCartan?

Wally and her student Conn AP English --1977

Teacher senior pictures . . . Can you find Wally?

Can you find Ruce, Holm, Strampe, Wally, Sime, Rolf?

EPHS English Dep't 1985!

 

Checkout our very own Captain English!

FUN SIGNS! 

(THESE ARE REAL)

 

 

 

MONDAY, May 2nd day 58

BOTH WALLIES & OLES:

  1. Group check-in:
  • Weekend
  • Debrief AP essay--sit in groups acc. to question and share what works you used
  • Poetry Partners--"Teach" each other the terms--then pass to next group.  People can add on examples, ask questions, refine examples.   Write your name on your card.
  • Children's Books
  •  
  1. FINISH  THEORIES: new historicism, deconstruction

    Olson does Marxist "Hansel & Gretel" with Wally showing outline and due date and pink slip due.  Read "Jack and Jill"

    Discuss Lit. Theory paper--block it out on transparency

    OTHER IDEAS:  "Red Riding Hood"  and the Little Freud piece to kick off unit,    "Serendipity and Lit Theory" -- Rachel Kaufman and Julia Callandar's story about Deborah Appleman, read Ada Alden's column about "Slovenly Peter "then show ANTZ film clip..  

  2. Go over lit theory "Singing Lesson" quiz
  3. Burning questions on the lit theory paper?
  4. Play Babasword audio of "Dead Poets" rap:  For the audio, click here:   http://babasword.com/writing/swordplay.html  o http://babasword.com/audio/deadpoets.mp3  For the text, click here: http://babasword.com/writing/poetry/deadpoets.html   CLICK HERE FOR THE TEXT.

     Poetry perceptions, views, frustrations, etc. about previous dealings with poetry.   Click HERE for the cover.

    MODERN TRENDS IN POETRY:  Poet Laureate?  American and British positions, differences, incentives, legacies?  Discuss the SIBL project ("O Captain," "TKM," and Frankenstein songs) www.artistsforliteracy.org and perhaps play "Flight of Icarus" (Iron Maiden) or "Icarus" or "Icarus II" (Kansas) or "Dust in the Wind" or "For Whom the Bell Tolls" by Iron Maiden

     

  5.  

    "Gather ye rosebuds while ye may" 

 

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. AP ESSAY #4
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONDAY, May 2nd day 58

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. Finish WA 18 PARTNER POEMS (20 points after doing "Tips," yellow worksheets, and journaling on your assigned poem and tonight journaling on your partner's poem)  4.  For the poem YOUR PARTNER was assigned, do your best to explicate the poem's THEMES/UNIVERSAL QUESTIONS (one side minimum is required). Try to include how the poem gets at these THEMES/UNIVERSAL QUESTIONS by the use of  these relevant techniques--as defined on the "How to Explicate a Poem" sheet (Click HERE for this sheet)--SITUATION, STRUCTURE, LANGUAGE, POETIC DEVICES (Look back at the poem carefully for the use of any poetic devices that make the poem "work" and, hence, enhance the understanding/appreciation of the poem as well as lead you to believe the emotions evoked by the poem and its themes are probably what the poet intended.)  For HELP, consult the following: the hand-out "Tips for writing the AP Lit. Exam" (click HERE for a copy), the blue Poetry Packet p. E5 "Perrine's  Questions about any Poem," and the salmon "How to Explicate a Poem" sheet (Click HERE for this sheet). For a pdf. copy of the BLUE POETRY PACKET, click HERE!

  2. AP essay for "A Woman's World"--spend 10 min. planning and 30 min. writing!   (The poem and prompt is on page P9 in your blue Poetry Packet.  So you can actively read the poem, you can print it out by clicking HERE.).

    Be sure to do the  prewriting on the yellow sheet provided in class.   If you need a copy of this poem and the prewriting sheets, click HERE. This prewriting will be collected as well. Spend no more than 10 minutes on this prewriting. 

    When done with prewriting, set your timer for 30 minutes and write the essay.  Stop exactly at 30 minutes. 

    After writing (or typing--DS, please!) the essay, look closely at the RUBRIC (click HERE for a copy)--available in narrative and in the form of a chart which we will use to grade your essay) go to pages AP 3 and AP 4 in your Poetry Packet.  Read the rubrics.  

    Give yourself a predicted score (1-9) and tell why you think you'll get that score.

    OPTIONAL:  The Controversial "Death of a Toad" AP Essay!  Click HERE if you would like to read the most controversial essay ever in the grading of an AP essay.  Rumor has it that this essay was discussed for over 2 hours before the AP graders came to resolution!  The essay was based on Wilburs' "The Death of a Toad."  Read all applicable parts (also on pages AP 11-15 in the blue Poetry Packet.  I'll share what happened with this essay later).  

         

    Eavan Boland

     

    Wally (and Carina age 10) meet Eavan Boland

 

Work on Literary Theory paper! (due Wednesday , May 18th).  

To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

To print a copy of 2011 reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TUESDAY, May 3rd day 59

 

"Gather ye rosebuds while ye may" 

"Young Girl and Death" painted by

Marianne Stokes

 

WHAT IS POETRY?

a DPS quote:

"We don't read and write poetry because it's cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for. To quote from Whitman, "O me! O life!... of the questions of these recurring; of the endless trains of the faithless... of cities filled with the foolish; what good amid these, O me, O life?" Answer. That you are here - that life exists, and identity; that the powerful play goes on and you may contribute a verse. That the powerful play *goes on* and you may contribute a verse. What will your verse be?"

They're not that different from you, are they? Same haircuts. Full of hormones, just like you. Invincible, just like you feel. The world is their oyster. They believe they're destined for great things, just like many of you, their eyes are full of hope, just like you. Did they wait until it was too late to make from their lives even one iota of what they were capable? Because, you see gentlemen, these boys are now fertilizing daffodils. But if you listen real close, you can hear them whisper their legacy to you. Go on, lean in. Listen, you hear it? - - Carpe - - hear it? - - Carpe, carpe diem, seize the day boys, make your lives extraordinary.

DPS goofs: http://imdb.com/title/tt0097165/goofs

  • Factual errors: The line that Keating refers to from Whitman's poem "Song of Myself" is misquoted. The line actually reads "I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world".
     
  • Audio/visual unsynchronized: After Keating instructs the boys to rip out the introduction to their poetry textbook, his lip movements do not match the speech.
  • Anachronisms: Although the setting is the 1950s, the chemistry textbook the students use, "Chemistry: A Modern Course" by Robert Smoot, is copyrighted 1987.
     
  • Anachronisms: The literature anthology, "Literature: Reading, Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and the Essay", edited by Robert DiYanni, was published by Random House in 1986.

Fun stuff about Dead Poets Society:

some DPS trivia:

  • Director Peter Weir chose to shoot the film in chronological order to better capture the development of the relationships between the boys and their growing respect for Mr. Keating.
     
  • Filmed at St. Andrews, a private boarding school in Delaware.

Today's Quotes of the Day:

"About suffering, they were never wrong

the old masters.  How well they understood"

The radical novelty of modern science lies precisely in the rejection of the belief ... that the forces which move the stars and atoms are contingent upon the preferences of the human heart. -Walter Lippman, journalist (1889-1974)

"There is no coming to consciousness without pain. -Carl Jung, psychiatrist (1875-1961)

"All things are difficult before they are easy."

-- Dr. Thomas Fuller

The radical novelty of modern science lies precisely in the rejection of the belief ... that the forces which move the stars and atoms are contingent upon the preferences of the human heart.

-Walter Lippman, journalist (1889-1974)

Today's Allusion:

the muses

Today's Words of the Day:

impinge

abate

antipathy

assail

OPEN MIC POETRY

BOWERY POETRY CLUB

NOVEMBER 10th, 2005

 

Wally, Billy Collins, and Wally's friend Gail in NYC Nov. 12, 2005 right after his performance at the Bowery Poetry Club with Taylor Mali--"Page Meets Stage"

my friends John Wirth (writer/producer of Ghost Whisperer, Nash Bridges, Remington Steele) and Gail Matthius on Saturday Night Live in the early 1980's with their friend Billy Collins

Wally with Taylor Mali at the Bowery Poetry Club in NYC Nov. 12, 2005 For more info. on this club, go here: http://www.bowerypoetry.com/

Billy Collins and Taylor Mali

"What Teachers Make" on DPJ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAVK2Agtr10&feature=related

"Conviction" on DPJ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCNIBV87wV4&feature=related

 parody of Taylor's "Conviction"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xp7Nh_Z99yY&feature=related

There is a podcast link on this page that you can use to actually hear excerpts from the night of "Page Meets Stage" with Billy Collins and Taylor Mali reading their poetry! It's podcast #1.  Check it out! (maybe you can hear Wally's annoying laugh, too!)

 

 

It's baseball season!!

Go CUBS!

 

TUESDAY, May 3rd day 59

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

Group check-in:

  • Choose a poetry definition on front of packet that group likes  Click HERE for the cover.
  • on computer in classroom: Type your assigned literary terminology on master terms sheet
  •  Songs: "Newsies or Metallica "Carpe Diem Baby" or techno--"The World is Your Oyster" continue to Write your assigned literary term's definitions and finish clipboard--poetic terms
  •  
  1. Poetry TERM CARDS--rotate & discuss AP Boland Essay
  2. Dead Poets clip (8 min.)--allusions and symbols--maybe "To the Virgins" and read Jaclyn's e-mail. Show example of allusions such as carpe diem, Herrick's cat parody, to "air" is human, etc. 
  3. DIDLS: Marianne Stokes painting--analysis and Herrick's "To the Virgins to Make Much of Time"   Click HERE for a copy of this poem and Essay on Criticism.

     

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. WA 18 Intro to Poetry--20 pts. stamp four sides
  1. Boland AP essay--yellow prewriting, score sheet (score yourself)

 

 

TUESDAY, May 3rd day 59

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1.  BE AN AP READER!  Read the AP essays on pages AP 5-10 in the blue Poetry Packet and score them using the rubric on pp. AP 3-4.  (old ASSIGNMENT R: ) Make sure you write down justification for the scores on the essays themselves. For a copy of the essays in the Poetry packet, click HERE and scroll down.   Use the PINK FORM (Click  HERE for a WORD copy or HERE for a pdf. copy) to record your scores and the justification (rationale) or set up your paper landscape in 6 columns:

    _____________________________________________________

    sample C       sample D       sample          sample F          sample O        sample PP

    Score: ___      Score: ___     Score: ___   Score: ___         Score: ___     Score: ___

    Rationale:      Rationale:       Rationale:    Rationale:        Rationale:       Rationale

     

  2. DO WA 19 "M and M + 6 Degrees!" ("Musee des Beaux Arts" and "Meditation l7" and 6 Degrees) This will be a minimum of a three-sider = 15 points.

    TOPIC ONE: "Musee des beaux arts" (there is a copy of it on page OP 19 in your Poetry Packet)  You can also print out a copy if you would like to ACTIVELY  read it!   DO THE FOLLOWING: 

    1.      Read the poem silently.  Now look at the painting on p. 1103.

    2.      Read "Musee" again, but this time continue to study the painting on p. 1103 as you read.

    3.   Write a brief literal summary of the poem

    4.     Describe the feelings/mood the poem evokes

    5.    Discuss the themes/universal or global questions the poem suggests

    6.  Discuss connections to your own life/yourself/the lives of others/ to society

    7. Look carefully once again for the use of any  poetic devices  that make the poem "work" and, hence, enhance the understanding/appreciation of the poem as well as lead you to believe the feelings and themes of the poem are probably what the poet intended. Do try your best to apply your assigned poetic device(s) to this poem. ) For HELP, consult the following: the hand-out "Tips for writing the AP Lit. Exam" (click HERE for a copy), the blue Poetry Packet p. E5 "Perrine's  Questions about any Poem," and the salmon "How to Explicate a Poem" sheet (Click HERE for this sheet).

    ENRICHMENT! HERE ARE SOME FUN WEBSITES ABOUT THIS POEM/PAINTING:

    Click  http://poetrypages.lemon8.nl/life/musee/museebeauxarts.htm   

    CLICK HERE FOR A COPY OF "MUSEE" and

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbY5GsAnp_A for a slide show of Brueghel's paintings

    TOPIC TWO: “Meditation 17”

    Read John Donne's famous sermon called "Meditation l7," which is in our black LBT text pp. 366-368. 

    Read the entire sermon first.  When you are done, do your best to identify the "BIG IDEAS" he is putting forth in this very famous sermon.  Also, think about any "UNANSWERABLE QUESTIONS" that arise in your mind as a result of reflecting on his themes.

    In your WA, write down those "BIG" IDEAS" and  "UNANSWERABLE QUESTIONS."

    Now, you are to go back and read the sermon more closely.  As you are rereading, look for quotations that you would deem "significant" in terms of emphasizing those "BIG" IDEAS" and  "UNANSWERABLE QUESTIONS."   You must locate at least 5

    Write these "SIGNIFICANT QUOTATIONS" down in your WA, and after each, explain thoroughly or give rationale as to why that quotation is so significant / powerful / revealing, etc.

    TOPIC THREE: 6 Degrees of Separation

    Find out as much as you can about the "Six Degrees of Separation" Theory!  Check out these "Six Degrees of Separation" websites! (some of the links might be broken; just keep trying)  Jot down some notes on the BACK SIDE of WA 9--what you think/learned about the theory and anything you found interesting!

    HERE'S THE 6 degrees GAME!  http://www.thekevinbacongame.com/

    GENERAL INFO ON THE 6 degrees theory

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Degrees_of_Kevin_Bacon

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPB8L_sFMaM

    http://www.sixdegrees.org/  (Kevin's site)

    MORE INFO ON THE 6 degrees theory

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2008/aug/03/internet.email

    http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1511/is_12_19/ai_59587202

    http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/0,,sid9_gci932596,00.html

    http://aries.mos.org/sixdegrees/

    http://www.travellerspoint.com/forum.cfm?thread=14673

    the game    http://OracleOfBacon.org

    or http://www.thekevinbacongame.com/

    http://www-distance.syr.edu/bacon.html

    http://msnbc.com/onair/nbc/dateline/KBacon/Kevin.asp

    http://www.sixdegrees.org/  (Kevin's site)

    the movie Six Degrees of Separation

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0108149/

    Work on Literary Theory paper! (due Wednesday , May 18th).  

    To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

    To print a copy of 2011 reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

    There's some synchronicity, eh?

    1.  

    Check it out! WALLY'S NEW COOL POETRY LINKS!

    NEW LINKS 2010!

    BBC POETRY SEASON

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/poetryseason/

    BBC TOP BRITISH POETS 2010 VOTE RESULTS

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/poetryseason/vote_results.shtml

    Benjamin Zephaniah 3rd place

    http://www.benjaminzephaniah.com/content/304.php

    BOWERY POETRY CLUB NYC

    http://www.bowerypoetry.com/

    Auden reading "Musee"--poetry animations but his real voice

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZqftCZD2NI&feature=related

    Yeats reading "Innisfree"--poetry animations but his real voice

    http://www.youtube.com/user/poetryanimations#p/u/424/_Xty-kkMmKU

    Stevie Smith reading "Not Waving"--poetry animations but her real voice

    http://www.youtube.com/user/poetryanimations#p/u/451/s8KIr98WDtc

    Big Country performing their "Not Waving but Drowning"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1_qqjJXBEc

    Do not go gentle--Dylan Thomas reading to art images

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ygvTW-6dH8g&feature=related

    another option Dylan Thomas

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E9Y9oKuCdbQ&feature=fvw

    Rodney Dangerfield in Back to School reading Dylan Thomas' "Do not go gentle"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTv1Dmu5CYc&feature=related

    Gina Loring "Somewhere There is a Poem"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PovgQ8jd0Q&feature=related

     

 WEDNESDAY, May 4th day 60

Emporer's New Clothes

Today's allusion:

TOWER OF BABEL

Quotes for Today:

"He prayeth best who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all."

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

and

Spring is nature's way of saying, "Let's party!" 

~Robin Williams

and

"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times; it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness; it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity; it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness; it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair; we had everything before us, we had nothing before us; we were all going directly to Heaven, we were all going the other way."

Dickens

 

♥♥♥ 77 LOVE SONNETS ♥♥♥

BY GARRISON KEILLOR

From Garrison Keillor:

"When I was 16, Helen Fleischman assigned me to memorize Shakespeare's Sonnet No. 29, "When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state" for English class, and fifty years later, that poem is still in my head. Algebra got washed away, and geometry and most of biology, but those lines about the redemptive power of love in the face of shame are still here behind my eyeballs, more permanent than my own teeth. The sonnet is a durable good. These 77 of mine include sonnets of praise, some erotic, some lamentations, some street sonnets and a 12-sonnet cycle of months. If anything here offends, I beg your pardon, I come in peace, I depart in gratitude."

http://www.elabs7.com/ct.html?rtr=on&s=fj6,ggr6,dv,m9yp,85wm,iih1,lp0o

GK reads from 77 Love Sonnets in San Francisco on June 6:

http://www.elabs7.com/ct.html?rtr=on&s=fj6,ggr6,dv,8l1l,aw78,iih1,lp0o

Billy Collins and Taylor Mali

There is a podcast link on this page that you can use to actually hear excerpts from the night of "Page Meets Stage" with Billy Collins and Taylor Mali reading their poetry! It's podcast #1.  Check it out! (maybe you can hear Wally's annoying laugh, too!)

SLAM POETRY SITES!!!!!

  

http://www.louderarts.com/faq/  (slam poetry site)

 AND  http://www.defpoetryjam.com/

AND http://www.hbo.com/defpoetry/

AND http://aalbc.com/authors/def_poetry_jam_story.htm

AND http://www.defpoetryjamontour.com/

AND  www.poetryslam.com

      National "slammer"champ

Taylor Mali

 AND www.taylormali.com   (Taylor Mali's site!  You can actually hear him recite his poetry.  He's won the nat'l slam poetry championship more than anyone!)

Hey, all you teacher wannabes, to look at Taylor's website outlining his dream to convince 1,000 people to become teachers (because of his inspiration):

http://web.mac.com/tmali/iWeb/1,000%20New%20Teachers/The%20Mission.html

For a parody on Mali's poem "What Teachers Make," click HERE!

Check out Bassey Ikpi and Alicia Keyes:

Bassey Ikpi's  "Homeward"  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTcOWR3uc0E&feature=related

Diallo  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tj4C8riMsKI

Apology to My Unborn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzyrHsYTveE&feature=related

 Alicia Keys "POW" (from her book "Tears fro Water")

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLk_Q3Cq2Ns  

More SLAMMERS:

Steve Coleman "I want this poem"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3bbpj2hX6w&feature=related

Eric Darby Scratch & Dent Dreams

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfTa4B7wQ_8

Oscar Brown, Jr. "This Beach"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRFb-D1gYY0&feature=related

Favorite Poem project   Musee"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlbFQ5ZtjVY&feature=related

Auden himself reading "Musee"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZqftCZD2NI

Slave to Beauty  (inspired by "Musee")

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tT6p1vkq5h4&feature=related

Four Weddings and a Funeral  Auden's "Stop All the Clocks"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_a-eXIoyYA&feature=related

another "Stop All the Clocks" with film clips

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1O4LGBxEeA&feature=related

 

WEDNESDAY, May 4th day 60

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

Group check-in:

  • C/C scores of AP Boland Essay and come to consensus
  • Share your poetry terms notecards & pass on to next group
  •  Songs: "Newsies or Metallica "Carpe Diem Baby" or techno--"The World is Your Oyster" continue to Write your assigned literary term's definitions and finish clipboard--poetic terms
  1. Poetry TERM CARDS--rotate & discuss AP Boland Essay
  2. SCANSION with POPE :  Pope quotes--each person gets a slip and needs to find groups of 2 or three.  Discuss the meaning, the connections to writing, and any poetic devices that surface. 
  3.  Do  the PINK Scansion Quiz, and on the back side, the Asimov and figure out which sonnets are Shakespearean and which are Petrarchan.  Do these in pencil!  (If you would like to print out a copy of this, click HERE) The following tips/ info should help you.  TO DETERMINE RHYTHM PATTERN: Try  ITAD:  iambic (u/), trochaic (/u), anapestic (uu/), dactylic (/uu), pentameter.   TO DETERMINE RHYME:  You use small letters to designate the rhyming pattern.  For example, use an "a" to designate the last sound at the end of the first line.  Use a "b" to designate a different sound than sound "a."  Use a "c" to designate another different sound than sounds "a" or "b."  Use a "d" to designate another different sound at the end of a line than sounds "a" or "b" or "c," etc.)       

    Example:                                                  

    Small gnats that fly                                                      

    in hot July                                   a                                 

    and lodge in sleeping ears           b                       

    Can rouse therein                      c    

    A trumpet's din                          c                                      

    With Day of Judgment fears.       

    TO FIGURE OUT THE SONNETS ON THE RIGHT COLUMN OF PAGE T 10, YOU NEED TO KNOW THIS:  There are two types of sonnets: Shakespearean (consists of 3 quatrains rhyming like this abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd or? (lots of other options). 

    Click HERE for about 30 sonnets with which to practice.  At the end of the practice sonnets, there's some excellent info. on the sonnet form.   If you would like to read a Shakespearean sonnet every day, click http://www.sonnetaday.com/ for the link.  You can also get a sonnet e-mailed to you every single day by registering at this site!  Ahhh!  Finally, here is an excellent website that gives an overview of the sonnet and all kinds of variations.  Click http://www.sonnets.org/basicforms.htm 

    FOR FUN:  Check out Alan Rickman reading Shakespeare's "Sonnet 130 My Mistress Eyes"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cw6Swr-ME40&mode=related&search=

  4. IF time, PARTNER WORK--exchange and read each other's WA and discuss HOW DIDLS applies to your poems

NEW TERMS TODAY:  essay,  schema, metaphor, simile conceit, syntax, stanza, rhyme, paradox/oxymoron, mood, DIDLS (diction, imagery, details, language, syntax), juxtaposition, apostrophe, quatrain, couplet, octave, sestet, slant rhyme, essay, rhyme, slant rhyme, tone, mood, rhythm, sprung rhythm, ITAD:  iambic (u/), trochaic (/u), anapestic (uu/), dactylic (/uu), monometer, dimeter, trimeter, tetrameter, pentameter, hexameter, heptameter, , meter, foot, sonnet--2 types: Shakespearean (3 quatrains=abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd or ? heroic couplet, , euphony, cacophony, euphemism, pejorative. maxim,   irony.  imagery,   denotation, connotation,  symbol,  

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

 

  1. stamp WA 19 M + M + 6 Degrees (10 pts)

 

 

 
WEDNESDAY, May 4th day 60

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. OPTIONAL AP LIT POETRY TERMS REVIEW:

    FOR A COPY OF AP LIT POETRY TERMS PACKET, CLICK HERE

    For a great hand-out to review as you think about explicating the poetry on the AP Lit. Exam, click HERE

    Click HERE for the Literary Time Periods Time line/Works Most Frequently Appearing on the AP Open-ended Essay.

    Tips on How to Approach the AP Lit. Essay on Poetry

    Unlocking a poem's meaning-two parts: the "What"- (central purpose) and the "How"- (stylistic devices employed to enhance meaning)  

    a. Annotate copiously as you read the first time for poem's meaning (central purpose) and stylistic devices.

    b. Determine poem's central purpose- there is always a deeper meaning unrelated to plot in great poetry. For example, what universal comment is the poet making about life, mankind, or the human condition?  Plato
    believed that "Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history."  What vital truth has the poet discovered? How does the speaker feel (his attitude) about his subject?
      
    c. Re-read the poem, once again noting stylistic devices. You should be analyzing and determining the poem's tone/s, and contemplating the irony within the poem-it will be there. Don't be afraid to take risks;
    readers reward the unique and insightful thinker.
      
    d. Locating shifts IS essential- look for transitions in the poem: but, therefore, since, although, etc.  Also, use clear transitions in your essay.  These help the reader follow the flow of your essay.

    Keep your paragraphs organized; don't digress.
      
    e. Make a very brief plan before you write: cluster, list, etc.
      
    f. Begin to write.  Get to the point.  Cite title, poet, and central purpose, perhaps making a philosophical comment as you introduce your thesis. Try to make a strong first impression.
      
    g. Write to express, not impress. Inflated writing seldom gets the
    top scores.
      
    h. Use all your time, approaching the poem chronologically-line by line, or stanza by stanza- if you are comfortable with that; if not, you might approach your analysis through the different elements: irony, tone,
    alliteration, metaphors, etc.
      
    i. Before you end your essay, revisit the title and its implications,making sure you include a reference to it in your essay.
      
    j. Pay careful attention to the first and last two lines of the poem.
      
    k. Save a minute or two to proofread your essay; if you cannot read it, the readers won't be able to either!
      
    l. Make sure you have put the title in quotation marks and that you have included the poet's name.
      
    m. Do not confuse the poet with the speaker. They will almost always be different and you will run into trouble if you do.
        
                                                            
    Other Points to Remember

    1.     Always refer to the poet or speaker by last name only-never use first name only.

    2.     Give support and more support.  Use the poem!

    3.     Use ellipsis dots to shorten a long quote, and keep quotations from the poem as short as possible.  One word is often enough.  The readers have the poem in front of them; a full sentence is nearly always too much
    by far.

    4.     When citing an element, don't just mention it.  Explain how it functions

    5.     Avoid "laundry lists" of elements that go nowhere.

    6.     When referring to a word as a word, underline it or put quotes around it. ("Nothing" is repeated frequently)

    7.     Place the end punctuation mark inside the quotation.

    8.     If you finish writing before time is up, DON'T.  You should be using every single minute.  

    9.     Read your response backward; this allows you to catch mistakes because you are forced to look at each word.

    10.                         Check spelling as best as you can.

    11.                         Avoid giving your essay a title.

    12.                         Do not bother with line numbers; they are not necessary in a timed writing, and we do not look at them.

    13.                         Underline titles of long works; use quotation marks around titles of shorter works.  Poems are put in quotation marks!

    14.                         Do NOT write in pencil.

    15.                         Do not use white out; we understand that you are writing a rough draft.

    16.                         Don't define terms; the readers are experienced AP teachers and college professors.

     

  2. OPTIONAL AP LIT EXAM PRACTICE--SCANSION: Do  the PINK Scansion Quiz, and on the back side, the Asimov and figure out which sonnets are Shakespearean and which are Petrarchan.  Do these in pencil!  (If you would like to print out a copy of this, click HERE) The following tips/ info should help you.  TO DETERMINE RHYTHM PATTERN: Try  ITAD:  iambic (u/), trochaic (/u), anapestic (uu/), dactylic (/uu), pentameter.   TO DETERMINE RHYME:  You use small letters to designate the rhyming pattern.  For example, use an "a" to designate the last sound at the end of the first line.  Use a "b" to designate a different sound than sound "a."  Use a "c" to designate another different sound than sounds "a" or "b."  Use a "d" to designate another different sound at the end of a line than sounds "a" or "b" or "c," etc.)       

    Example:                                                  

    Small gnats that fly                                                      

    in hot July                                   a                                 

    and lodge in sleeping ears           b                       

    Can rouse therein                      c    

    A trumpet's din                          c                                      

    With Day of Judgment fears.       

    TO FIGURE OUT THE SONNETS ON THE RIGHT COLUMN OF PAGE T 10, YOU NEED TO KNOW THIS:  There are two types of sonnets: Shakespearean (consists of 3 quatrains rhyming like this abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd or? (lots of other options). 

    Click HERE for about 30 sonnets with which to practice.  At the end of the practice sonnets, there's some excellent info. on the sonnet form.   If you would like to read a Shakespearean sonnet every day, click http://www.sonnetaday.com/ for the link.  You can also get a sonnet e-mailed to you every single day by registering at this site!  Ahhh!  Finally, here is an excellent website that gives an overview of the sonnet and all kinds of variations.  Click http://www.sonnets.org/basicforms.htm 

    FOR FUN:  Check out Alan Rickman reading Shakespeare's "Sonnet 130 My Mistress Eyes"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cw6Swr-ME40&mode=related&search=

  3. OPTIONAL AP LIT EXAM PRACTICE--MULTIPLE CHOISE TONE & DICTION: Do the TONE MULTIPLE CHOICE EXERCISE: Use the ivory-colored hand-out you got in class today--the last two pages!  Click HERE to print out a copy of this exercise.  Read each passage and choose the word that best describes the tone. As you read, underline what parts of the passage made you arrive at your answer.  Click HERE for a sheet on more specific tone words. You may have to look up some words (i.e., simpering, bantering, pedantic, disdainful, sardonic?)  CLICK HERE FOR THE ANSWER KEY!

  4. OPTIONAL AP LIT EXAM PROSE WORK PRACTICE WITH TONE & DICTION: #1  WORK WITH CHAPTER 3 in THE GREAT GATSBY:

    Explore Imagery and Tone in chapter 3 of The Great Gatsby  In your poetry packet, there is

  5. an excerpt (page E8-9) from chapter 3 of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby.   CLICK HERE  FOR THE GATSBY, THE STRANGER, AND ANOTHER FUN ASIMOV EXERCISE FROM THE POETRY PACKET AND SCROLL DOWN IF YOU WANT TO PRINT OUT A COPY OF THE PASSAGE SO YOU DON'T HAVE TO DO THE NOTES ON A SEPARATE SHEET OF PAPER (a GREAT idea).  Read the entire excerpt first.  As you read the excerpt quickly through, think about the mood (your emotional response) and the TONE (the author's attitude towards the topic/subject matter, the scene (the people, the atmosphere, etc.).  Jot down YOUR PERSONAL immediate response to TONE--positive, negative, neutral, indifferent?  Write that down on a sheet of paper called GATSBY NOTES.  Now it 's time to go back and justify/confirm your initial response.   On your GATSBY NOTES SHEET right under your projected TONE response, MAKE 5 columns--one column each for DIDLS (Diction, Imagery, Details, Language, Syntax ).  These are the poetic techniques Fitzgerald uses to establish his TONE.  Go back and read the excerpt again SLOWLY.  Concentrate on evidence for each of the DIDLS.  For DICTION, look for interesting/unusual/powerful word choices.  JOT down some of those in the DICTION column and what they connote.  Now, especially concentrate on the images Fitzgerald uses to create a picture in the reader's mind of the scene.  Look for sensory images in particular.  In the IMAGERY COLUMN, jot what you would consider the most effective images.  Now, go back once again and concentrate on the other DIDLS and do the same thing.   When you are done with this, go to pages E1, E3, E4 in the Poetry packet and look at the words to describe tone.  Look for around 5 words from these pages (or of your own choice) which best describe the TONE of this passage.  Write them down right by your original evaluation of TONE.  Do these words fit what you thought from the outset--positive, negative, neutral, indifferent?

    # 2.  Now, read the Camus passage ( from The Stranger) on page E6 of the Poetry packet.  Do the same thing as you did with the Gatsby excerpt.  If you would like a copy of this passage to print out and mark up, click HERE.

    OPTIONAL:  The Controversial "Death of a Toad" AP Essay!  Click HERE if you would like to read the most controversial essay ever in the grading of an AP essay.  Rumor has it that this essay was discussed for over 2 hours before the AP graders came to resolution!  The essay was based on Wilburs' "The Death of a Toad."  Read all applicable parts (also on pages AP 11-15 in the blue Poetry Packet.  I'll share what happened with this essay later).  

     

Work on Literary Theory paper! (due Wednesday , May 18th).  

To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

To print a copy of 2011 reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

 

THURSDAY, May 5th day 61

 AP LIT EXAM!

NO REGULAR CLASS TODAY . . . but going to the Supreme Court Hearings! 

Meet in our room 269 at 8:25!!!!

(Why not read some poetry? or Kafka?

or Vonnegut, anyone?)

Today's Quote of the Day: 

 in honor of Kurt Vonnegut (Slaughterhouse 5, Cat's Cradle, Breakfast of Champions)               

I want to stay as close to the edge as I can without going over. Out on the edge you see all kinds of things you can't see from the center. -Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., writer (1922-2007)

Check out his website:  http://www.vonnegut.com/

http://www.vonnegutweb.com/

Wally finds some

Serendipity in St. Paul April 8th!

Today's Allusion:

none

Today's Words of the Day:

withal

nemesis

lugubrious

zeitgeist

THURSDAY, May 5th day 61

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

 

NO REGULAR CLASS TODAY . . . but going to the Supreme Court Hearings! 

Meet in our room 269 at 8:25!!!!

 

THURSDAY, May 5th day 61

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. FANTASTIC HEATHLY FOOD FRIDAY (a.k.a. FHFF) tomorrow!  Bring something yummy!

    Hint!       

  2. Work on Literary Theory paper! (due Wednesday , May 18th).  

    To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

    To print a copy of 2011 reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

     

FRIDAY, May 6th day 62

Alexander Pope

Today's Quotes of the Day:

"We think our fathers fools so wise we grow

Our wiser sons no doubt will think us so"

Alexander Pope

AND

 "Never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee!"

~John Donne  

Today's Allusion:

Tower of Babel

Today's Words of the Day:

diurnal

indict

mendacity

mendicant

Wally in NYC at the Metropolitan Museum of Art with an original Pieter Bruegel painting--"The Harvesters" 

Bruegel painted "The Fall of Icarus"

  

W.H. AUDEN

--Check out this website!  These "Auden groupies" (Virtual Street Band) like to make up songs and cartoons to Auden's work:
This Virtual Street Band (which only exists and performs in cyberspace) has put 3 poems of Auden to music and made some flash videoclips to go along with them. Checking this site out is totally recommended, the site has a really cool feel to it, and the clips are awesome.
http://www.virtualstreetband.com

    

Another cool Auden poem is "Funeral Blues" or "Stop All the Clocks."  Here are some cool links to read and view some youtube stuff regarding "Musee" and other this awesome poem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9LJ9we02Ls

reading of the poem from the film Four Weddings and a Funeral

Another reading of the poem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcAYsJo3-uM&mode=related&search=

"Funeral Blues" to music James Horner

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HqZZXuIiJEY

HERE'S MORE:

Favorite Poem project   Musee"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlbFQ5ZtjVY&feature=related

Auden himself reading "Musee"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZqftCZD2NI

Slave to Beauty  (inspired by "Musee")

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tT6p1vkq5h4&feature=related

Four Weddings and a Funeral  Auden's "Stop All the Clocks"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_a-eXIoyYA&feature=related

another "Stop All the Clocks" with film clips

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1O4LGBxEeA&feature=related

  Favorite Poem project  "Out, out"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1V07Hu5d_Dg&feature=user

FUN POETRY STUFF FOR ENRICHMENT:

  1. FOR FUN! Check this web page about W.H. Auden's "Musee": http://poetrypages.lemon8.nl/life/musee/museebeauxarts.htm
  2. FOR FUN! Click on the link below to watch Elizabeth Susan Hambleton, a painter from New York, NY, read "Musee": http://www.favoritepoem.org/thevideos/hambleton.html
  3. FOR FUN!   Click on the link below to watch Elizabeth Wojtusik, a teacher from
    Humarock, MA, read "Out, Out-":
    http://www.favoritepoem.org/thevideos/wojtusik.html
  4. FOR FUN!   Click on the link below to watch other people read their favorite poems for the "Favorite Poem" project: http://www.favoritepoem.org/thevideos/index.html  I especially like "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks!  Which do you like best?
  5. For some additional cool websites Wally found online to enhance your experience with Poetry, click HERE! These include audio files of Billy Collins reading his poetry,  etc. etc. etc, and an MPR interviewwith former U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Haas (who discusses about 10 min. into the interview the OJ 1 Kennedy quote about "when power corrupts, literature cleanses").  He also talks about performance poetry vs. the private voice to the quiet of the mind (which he thinks his poetry is best suited to). He says that poetry can live in both places. He admires Gary Snyder as a mentor.  Website to hear this interview of Feb. 15, 2005 is: http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2006/02/15/midmorning2/

    http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2006/02/15/midmorning2/

 

   

W.H. AUDEN--Check out this website!  These "Auden groupies" (Virtual Street Band) like to make up songs and cartoons to

 Auden's work:
This Virtual Street Band (which only exists and performs in cyberspace) has put 3 poems of Auden to music and made some flash videoclips to go along with them. Checking this site out is totally recommended, the site has a really cool feel to it, and the clips are awesome.
http://www.virtualstreetband.com

"Slave to Beauty"--song to Brueghel's painting

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tT6p1vkq5h4&feature=related

Another cool Auden poem is "Funeral Blues" a.k.a. "Stop All the Clocks."  Here are some cool links to read and view some youtube stuff regarding this awesome poem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9LJ9we02Ls

reading of the poem from the film Four Weddings and a Funeral

Another reading of the poem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcAYsJo3-uM&mode=related&search=

"Funeral Blues" to music James Horner

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HqZZXuIiJEY

ALSO, click on the link below to watch Elizabeth Susan Hambleton, a painter from New York, NY, read "Musee": http://www.favoritepoem.org/thevideos/hambleton.html

The Great Gatsby

      

Today's Quotes of the Day

from The Great Gatsby:

Page 8 "Gatsby turned out all right at the end; it is what preyed on Gatsby, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dreams that temporarily closed out my interest in the abortive sorrows and short-winded elations of men."

Page 100-101 "It is invariably saddening to look through new eyes at things upon which you have expended your own powers of adjustment."

Page 118 "It occurred to me that there was no difference between men, in intelligence or race, so profound as the difference between the sick and the well."

Page 170 "They were careless people, Tom and Daisy — they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made…"

Page 171 "I became aware of the old island here that flowered once for Dutch sailors’ eyes — a fresh, green breast of the new world. Its vanished trees, the trees that had made way for Gatsby’s house, had once pandered in whispers to the last and greatest of all human dreams; for a transitory enchanted moment man must have held his breath in the presence of this continent, compelled into an aesthetic contemplation he neither understood nor desired, face to face for the last time in history with something commensurate to his capacity for wonder."

Page 172 "tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms further…And on fine morning - / So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."

 

CHECK OUT SOME SLAM POETRY EXAMPLES:

Bassey Ikpi's  "Homeward"  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTcOWR3uc0E&feature=related

Diallo  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tj4C8riMsKI

Apology to My Unborn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzyrHsYTveE&feature=related

OR  Alicia Keys "POW" and discuss TONE and what support there is for her tone interpretation (DIDLS) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLk_Q3Cq2Ns  

Steve Coleman "I want this poem"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3bbpj2hX6w&feature=related

Eric Darby Scratch & Dent Dreams

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfTa4B7wQ_8

Oscar Brown, Jr. "This Beach"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRFb-D1gYY0&feature=related

Favorite Poem project   Musee"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlbFQ5ZtjVY&feature=related

Auden himself reading "Musee"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZqftCZD2NI

Slave to Beauty  (inspired by "Musee")

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tT6p1vkq5h4&feature=related

Four Weddings and a Funeral  Auden's "Stop All the Clocks"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_a-eXIoyYA&feature=related

another "Stop All the Clocks" with film clips

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1O4LGBxEeA&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1O4LGBxEeA&feature=related

 

 

 

FRIDAY, May 6th day 62

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

 

Group check-in:

  • Weekend
  • Exam?

 

  1. PARTNER WORK--exchange and read each other's WA and discuss HOW DIDLS applies to your poems

  2. Share DPS quote: "We don't read and write poetry because it's cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for. To quote from Whitman, "O me! O life!... of the questions of these recurring; of the endless trains of the faithless... of cities filled with the foolish; what good amid these, O me, O life?" Answer. That you are here - that life exists, and identity; that the powerful play goes on and you may contribute a verse. That the powerful play *goes on* and you may contribute a verse. What will your verse be?"
  3. show 2nd DPS film clip teaching from book
  4. Collins "Introduction to Poetry" Click HERE for a copy.

    MODERN TRENDS IN POETRY:  Poet Laureate?  American and British positions, differences, incentives, legacies?  Discuss the SIBL project ("O Captain," "TKM," and Frankenstein songs) www.artistsforliteracy.org and perhaps play "Flight of Icarus" (Iron Maiden) or "Icarus" or "Icarus II" (Kansas) or "Dust in the Wind" or "For Whom the Bell Tolls" by Iron Maiden

     

  5. Advice to Writers" and allusion to Alexander Pope! Maybe show DVD of Billy Collins' "How to Read a Poem" and various experts' opinions on poetry and Collins.  
  6. INTRO: SLAM POETRY--WHAT IS SLAM POETRY?--Show  Taylor Mali's poems/video "Conviction" or "Totally Like" or play Taylor Mali "Proofreading" poem or show video from Bowery Club or Taylor Mali's poems/video  "Teachers" and Bassey Ikpi's "Silence" and Rat Sack "I'm Losing You"

    MORE SLAM POETRY?--Show  9 min.  video from Bowery Club ("Forgetfulness" & "Introduction" and "Proofreading" or Bassey Ipki's "Homeward"or Rat Sack "I'm Losing You" or Poetry "Krispy Kreme" or Alicia Keyes on youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLk_Q3Cq2Ns

  7.  
  8.  
  9. NEW TERMS TODAY:

    essay,  schema, metaphor, simile conceit, syntax, stanza, rhyme, paradox/oxymoron, mood, DIDLS (diction, imagery, details, language, syntax), juxtaposition, apostrophe, quatrain, couplet, octave, sestet, slant rhyme, essay, rhyme, slant rhyme, tone, mood, rhythm, sprung rhythm, ITAD:  iambic (u/), trochaic (/u), anapestic (uu/), dactylic (/uu), monometer, dimeter, trimeter, tetrameter, pentameter, hexameter, heptameter, , meter, foot, sonnet--2 types: Shakespearean (3 quatrains=abab,cdcd,efef and 1 couplet=gg) and Petrarchan octave=abbaabba sestet=cdecde or cddcdd or cdccdc or cdcdcd or ? heroic couplet, euphony, cacophony, euphemism, pejorative. maxim,   irony.  imagery  denotation, connotation,  symbol,  

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. WA 19 M & M & 6 degrees (10 pts.)
 

 

FRIDAY, May 6th day 62

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. Work on Literary Theory paper! (due Wednesday , May 18th).  

    To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

    To print a copy of 2011 reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

     

  2. CARPE DIEM!

      Do something in the spirit of Carpe Diem!  Remember to "Gather ye rosebuds while ye may"

      Here's an idea how . . .  

      Do you think this class inspired Kelly to do this?  Maybe . . .

    karpnull

    diSpacingm 

     

    How do you "seize the day"?

     

OVER FLOW

 

 

 

 

 

 

R&G are Dead

Which one is which?

 

 

 

 

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

scenes from the film . . .

Newtonian Physics:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5_ayuaCzZs&feature=related

Gravity Question Court:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maI53H4Zbrs&feature=related

The funniest best of R&G:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRj_tpfrYHs&feature=fvwrel

PLAY A GAME?:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-Sx4W2cKlU&feature=related

R&G meet Hamlet:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6LO4EQcMR2Q&feature=related

There isn't any wind:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IAxeLiaHmIg&feature=related

Tom Stoppard talks with Charlie Rose:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eoSnabj-Cc4&feature=fvwrel

R & G (1990), part 1 of 14, full length movie:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDI0jIlPLGM&feature=related

Tom Roth (played Guildenstern in R&G movie--1990) interview:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vUO--q4Ys4&feature=related

 Gary Oldman (played Rosencrantz in R&G movie--1990) interview:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Wm3ihhrD7c&feature=related

Shakespeare on Film: Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead

MM's seventh week of Shakespeare on Film explores the Bard's original comedy duo


 

Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead (1990)
directed by Tom Stoppard

Tom Stoppard originally sold the screen rights to Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead, the stage comedy which made his name, soon after its 1967 premieres in the West End and on Broadway. He wrote a screenplay for MGM, then saw the project languish for twenty years until the rights were bought back and he rewrote the script and filmed it in what was then still Yugoslavia.

Film and play view the events of Hamlet entirely from the point of view of the Prince’s doomed friends as they travel to Elsinore, kick their heels ‘off stage,’ and sail to England. Tim Roth’s irritable, sarcastic Guildenstern, who’s not as clever as he thinks he is, and Gary Oldman’s garrulous, goofy Rosencrantz, who’s not as dumb as he appears, muse on why they have been summoned and how to plumb the madness of lain Glen’s mild-mannered, romantic Hamlet. Rosencrantz considers mortality in a rambling, banal equivalent of “To be, or not to be,” and keeps asking who he is, because Stoppard’s most persistent running joke—spun from the moment in Hamlet when Gertrude reverses Claudius’s “Thanks, Rosencrantz and gentle Guildenstern”—is that neither they, nor anybody else at court knows which is which.

Stoppard likened this shabby, oddly likeable pair to “a Shakespearean Laurel and Hardy or Abbott and Costello,” although their clipped, question-and-answer routines are more like the idle chatter of Vladimir and Estragon in Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot: Beautifully timed, inconsequential and better suited to stage than screen.

Conscious that theatrical dialogues might not captivate a cinema audience, Stoppard introduces and over-indulges a new gag in which Rosencrantz casually makes “scientific” discoveries, including steam power, gravity and the hamburger. Yet no matter how often he sends the pair clattering up and down flights of wooden stairs in a suspiciously deserted castle, his methods, as The Independent on Sunday noted, “still reek of the stage.”

Today's Allusion:

witch hunt

Today's Words of the Day:

mercurial

metonymy

Draconian

disdain

Today's Quotes of the Day

(from Rosencrantz & Guildenstern):

Rosencrantz: Life in a box is better than no life at all, I expect. You'd have a chance, at least. You could lie there thinking, "Well. At least I'm not dead.'

Rosencrantz: Whatever became of the moment when one first knew about death? There must have been one. A moment. In childhood. When it first occured to you that you don't go on forever. Must have been shattering. Stamped into one's memory. And yet, I can't remember it. It never occured to me at all. We must be born with an intuition of mortality. Before we know the word for it. Before we know that there are words. Out we come, bloodied and squawling, with the knowledge that for all the points of the compass, theres only one direction. And time is its only measure.

Rosencrantz: Shouldn't we be doing something... constructive?
Guildenstern: What did you have in mind? A short, blunt human pyramid?

Rosencrantz: Do you think Death could possibly be a boat?
Guildenstern: No, no, no... Death is "not." Death isn't. Take my meaning? Death is the ultimate negative. Not-being. You can't not be on a boat.
Rosencrantz: I've frequently not been on boats.
Guildenstern: No, no... What you've been is not on boats.

Rosencrantz: What are you playing at?
Guildenstern: Words. Words. They're all we have to go on.

Player King: Audiences know what they expect and that is all they are prepared to believe in.

Rosencrantz: Do you want to play questions?
Guildenstern: How do you play that?
Rosencrantz: You have to ask a question.
Guildenstern: Statement. One - Love.
Rosencrantz: Cheating.
Guildenstern: How?
Rosencrantz: I haven't started yet.
Guildenstern: Statement. Two - Love.
Rosencrantz: Are you counting that?
Guildenstern: What?
Rosencrantz: Are you counting that?
Guildenstern: Foul. No repetition. Three - Love and game.
Rosencrantz: I'm not going to play if you're going to be like that.

Rosencrantz: This place is a madhouse!

Guildenstern: All your life you live so close to truth it becomes a permanent blur in the corner of your eye. And when something nudges it into outline, it's like being ambushed by a grotesque.

Player: We do on stage the things that are supposed to happen off. Which is a kind of integrity, if you look on every exit being an entrance somewhere else.

Guildenstern:We cross our bridges when we come to them and burn them behind us, with nothing to show for our progress except a memory of the smell of smoke, and a presumption that once our eyes watered.

Player: You don't understand the humiliation of it-- to be tricked out of the single assumption which makes our existence viable-- that somebody is watching . . . . We're actors-- we're the opposite of people!

Eternity's a terrible thought. I mean, where's it all going to end?

Ambassador from England: The sight is dismal / And our affairs from England come too late. / The ears are senseless that should give us hearing, to tell him his commandment is fulfilled,/ That Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead.

 

Click here to see the Simpsons' version of Hamlet:

http://www.milkandcookies.com/link/54549/detail/

      

For more fun Shakespeare youtube links, click HERE.

The Lion King and Hamlet?  Oh, yeah!

"About suffering, they were never wrong

the old masters.  How well they understood"

Today's Quote of the Day:

"Life is a gamble, at terrible odds -- if it was a bet, you wouldn't take it."   -- Tom Stoppard

 

  OVERFLOW 2012

 

 

 

  1.  

  2. CC#3  KIDS ON A TREE (2 sider) You need a hand-out to do this CC.  Click HERE if you missed it in class.    (Designate which teacher you would like to read this one. You may indicate whether you want both teachers to read CC#3, too, or you may simply write down "EITHER" if it doesn't matter which teacher reads your CC#3.)  NOTE:  You need a special hand-out to do this journal.

 

  1. HEADS UP!   Bring or e-mail Wally lwallenberg@edenpr.org  a prom picture for the website (if you like)!

  2. Arcadia  Read the entire play--due TUESDAY.   Buy a copy in the school store ($12.00). Do OJ 26 Notes on the First Read-Through (questions, comments, maybe some F.I.G. questions, initial confusions, and What do you "get" upon your initial reading of Arcadia? etc.  etc.  etc.)

    Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals.   It looks like this:

  3.  

  4.  

    ARCADIA PIX:

            

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Mof M PREP WORK:  --Read the hand-out carefully.  Start thinking of themes for your groups.  Start thinking about what role YOU would like to play--scriptwriter, costume designer, actor, techie, etc.  If you are the designated leader(s), read the Mof M agenda carefully and be ready to lead the group at Friday's MofM meeting #1!

 

  1. A Glossary of Literary TermsPoetic Device Assignment (old ASSIGNMENT L #1).  If you missed class or are unaware of what terms you are assigned, click HERE to see what your assigned term(s)are.  Define your assigned Poetry Term(s) using TWO DIFFERENT SOURCES other than a generic dictionary and give several examples of each term. If you have many terms, one example will suffice. You may use the black textbook (LBT) for one of your definitions of your assigned terms, but you must find another CREDIBLE (not a generic dictionary like Webster's) source (it can be an online source like those linked below) for your other definition.  Look for literary terms dictionaries or check out websites such as the following:                  http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88/poetic-terms.html or  http://www.k-state.edu/english/baker/english320/cc.htm  or http://ethnicity.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Terms/  or http://www.northern.edu/hastingw/terms.htm   or  http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_I.html 

  2. WA 10: POEMS! POEMS! POEMS!  (3 topics over a minimum of 2 sides)  1. SHARE YOUR PERSONAL THOUGHTS/EXPERIENCES REGARDING POETRY and STUDYING POETRY.   2.  Skim through the blue Poetry Packet (PP) pp. OP-1 to OP-18.  CLICK HERE for a copy of the BLUE Poetry Packet if you didn't get it in class.  Read what strikes you.  Comment on what you found interesting in these pages.  If you are reacting to a particular poem, be sure to identify its title/poet. 3. Check out the websites linked below and comment on what you found interesting. Be sure to jot down the URL and the title/description of the site on which you are commenting!    Click HERE to see WALLY'S COOL POETRY LINKS! 

  1. Share your CARPE DIEM!  EXPERIENCES! 

 

 

 

  1.  

    WA  20 "Chaucerian Shadowing" (2 sider--front side observation notes and predictions/back side about physiognomy/humors and YOU!)  Follow the linked hand-out on how to do this (click HERE)  Click HERE for a copy of the Chaucer Packet (the front cover has the Chaucerian Shadowing assignment explained). (This is old AP ASSIGNMENT C2)  If you were absent today and missed our explaining the shadowing experience, follow the instructions outlined HERE.

    FOR FUN!  Below are listed are some cool websites on the humors.  You can take a test and find out if your personality is sanguine, melancholy, choleric, or phlegmatic (rather like the COLOR tests).

    First site--click on the link, then select "Take the Free Personality/Temperament test online."

    http://www.oneishy.com/personality/

     

  2. OJ 18 "Hello Chaucer!" (2 sides minimum)  For the first side,  read "Some Introductory Observations for the Modern Reader of The Canterbury Tales" pp. xiii-xxix. take one side of a page of notes on anything that strikes you as interesting/important to the study of Chaucer/The Canterbury Tales

  3. For the back  side of OJ 21 "Hello Chaucer!", read the  "Prologue to Canterbury Tales" pp. 1-17.   On the top of the back side of this journal, write "Getting to Know You" (1 side minimum-- 1/2 page introducing/describing your assigned character you signed up for today and 1/2 page about you as if Chaucer were to introduce/describe you in the same technique he uses for his characters .  NOTE:  if you were NOT in class today to get an assigned character, choose any one you'd like.  However, make sure to indicate on the top of your OJ 21: Getting to Know You  that you chose your own character!) (This is old AP ASSIGNMENT C1)

    FOR FUN!  Below are listed are some cool websites on the humors.  You can take a test and find out if your personality is sanguine, melancholy, choleric, or phlegmatic (rather like the COLOR tests).  First site--click on the link, then select "Take the Free Personality/Temperament test online now."

    http://www.oneishy.com/personality/

    Another site--click on the link, then select "Eysenck Personality Test (46 questions)"

    www.similarminds.com/cgibin/eysenck.pl

    FOR FUN!  Here are some more Chaucer websites to check out:

    http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

    http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

    http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

    Here are some cool Chaucer websites to check out:

    http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/sc/chaucer/chaucer.htm

    http://www.towson.edu/~duncan/chaucer/images.htm

    http://www.huntington.org/HLPress/chaucerdetail.html

  4. Start familiarizing yourself with the CT paper (remember NO BUYBACKS!!!) (technical aspects graded by avg. errors per page!) Read the purple packet outlining the CT paper  For a copy of this packet, click HERE.  It's due Wednesday, June 2. To see a copy of the packet and/or print off the grading sheet, click HERE.  Click HERE for a copy of brainstormed IDEAS FOR MEETING PLACES.

  5. Work on Literary Theory paper! (due Wednesday , May 18th).  

    To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE

    To print a copy of 2011 reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.