back to AP English Home Page

Click  HERE for the CLASS OF 2011 PHOTO GALLERY.

Click the following website for the WEB ALBUM GALLERY:

https://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011APLitClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIre876Uxtrs2wE#

 

WEEK 12a: April 25-April 29, 2011

NEW PICTURES!

Click  HERE for the CLASS OF 2011 PHOTO GALLERY.

Click the following website for the WEB ALBUM GALLERY:

https://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011APLitClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIre876Uxtrs2wE#

 

  Hamlet Acts 4-5 (Oles) 

and

  Frankenstein Finale (Wallies) 

and

Everybody Back Together Again for

 

 

 Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead,

 

 

Chat on coin toss probability:

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=jlkmyqrp9ec9s11k3n6qp1zd&page=0

 

AND

Literary Theory (everyone in Wally's room on Wednssday)

To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE.  To print a copy of reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

LITERARY THEORY PAPER!

    

  Literary Theory paper is due

Wednesday , May 18th.  

To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To print out a copy of the Lit. Theory paper packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE.  To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE.  To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE.  To print a copy of 2011 reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

Hamlet on ?  Of course!

He's hip, you dig?

http://www.angelfire.com/art2/antwerplettuce/hamlet.html

 

 

FOR FUN, Take a look that this Pride & Prejudice Austen

http://www.much-ado.net/austenbook/

Hamlet newspaper front page

Hamlet downloadable Multiple Critical Perspectives

http://www.prestwickhouse.com/pc-11078-39-hamlet-downloadable-multiple-critical-perspectives.aspx?category=5

Create a study guide for a scene in Hamlet

http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=dg384q3w_62d77658

Artwork inspired by Hamlet

http://www.english.emory.edu/classes/Shakespeare_Illustrated/Shakespeare.html

 

Click  HERE for the CLASS OF 2011 PHOTO GALLERY.

Click the following website for the WEB ALBUM GALLERY:

https://picasaweb.google.com/103391408735368780157/2011APLitClassPix?authkey=Gv1sRgCIre876Uxtrs2wE#

 

Click HERE to see Wally's current list of WA Journals.  

Click HERE to see Olson's current list of OJ journals.

Click HERE to go automatically to the yellow HW packet!

Click HERE for the Literary Time Periods Time line/Works Most Frequently Appearing on the AP Open-ended Essay.

Click HERE for a copy of the ivory HAMLET PACKET.

Click HERE to get a pdf. copy of the Hamlet AP Question Packet.

Click HERE to get a pdf. copy of the Hamlet Soliloquy Packet.

FOR A COPY OF THE 2009 AP LIT POETRY TERMS PACKET, CLICK HERE!  YOU MAY WANT TO PRINT THIS!

Buybacks 

Notes: 1.  Record your results on the yellow and pink sheets in your folder.   By the way, Mr. Olson doesn't like to use the boxes at the end of the grading sheet.  He prefers that you read his comments in the margins to find the positives and suggestions.  You must summarize these in the pink boxes and write a goal for the next paper.  Then, record your number of errors in Lit. Analysis Paper column on the yellow technical sheet.) 2.   Be sure to follow directions! There will be a lot less "mercy" for not doing correcting the error correctly this time.   3.  YOU ARE REQUIRED TO WRITE OUT THE WHOLE SENTENCE THAT HAS THE ERROR(S).  DO NOT USE ELLIPSES!  4.  Make sure you do not make ANY NEW ERRORS.  If two or more errors occur in the same sentence, follow the specific directions on how to correct them all together.  5.   TURN BUYBACKS IN ON TIME!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  5.  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

 If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE. (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample (NOT PERFECT) of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

NOTE!  You may organize your buybacks by type of error or chronologically as they appear in your paper

 

 

 

 

 

 

DATE In-Class plan Homework (due next day almost always):

Monday, April 25 day 53

"ALAS, POOR HAMLET!"

Today's Quote of the Day:

Sir, in my heart there was a kind of fighting,
That would not let me sleep: methought I lay
Worse than the mutines in the bilboes. Rashly,
And praised be rashness for it, let us know,
Our indiscretion sometimes serves us well,
When our deep plots do pall: and that should teach us
There's a divinity that shapes our ends,
Rough-hew them how we will,--

Act 5  Hamlet

 

Is that Conn playing Hamlet or is he Laertes?

Michael Malone as Laertes

Today's Allusion:

magnum opus

 

 

Today's Words of the Day:

clandestine (Oles)

conciliate (Oles)

besmirch (Wallies)

betimes (Wallies)

Seamus Heaney reading "Tollund Man"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDT2ZdNL9CM

Tollund Man

First Science TV clip

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CQE4c8UJkM&feature=relate

Bog Mummies

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCj8XQLGSDs&feature=related

To see Wally's pictures and links about the BOG PEOPLE, click HERE!

 

 The Tollund Man

David Tennant as Hamlet

Royal Shakespeare Company's 2008 production of Hamlet with David Tennant as Hamlet and Patrick Stewart as Claudius

Click HERE for more pictures!

   David Tennant  (Dr. Who) as Hamlet

The entire RSC's latest production of Hamlet with David Tennant and Patrick Stewart is online!  Check it out periodically to see some of the scenes:

http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/2wyITj/www.pbs.org/arts/gallery/shakespeare-three-tragedies/hamlet-full-performance-video

Here are some youtube offerings from the RSC production:

video montages:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3BRJSaJSeV4&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ymh7ZOgt0HU&feature=related

David Tennant autograph signing at the RSC:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54VtbElkxr8&feature=related

Hamlet "trailer" of the RSC production:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eweyy0MnQns&feature=related

attending Hamlet RSC production

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwmM4R8PLaw&feature=related

 

Monday, April 25 day 53

OLES ONLY:

  1. Group check-in:--Act 4 purple quiz and stamp WA 15
  2. Act 3--"To be or not to be"
  3. IF TIME, VIDEOS :"To Be" spin-offs: Johnny Carson's "To be," Adam Sandler's "To be," Dawson's Creek "To be"
  4.   begin Act 4-Questions from purple quiz--main events in Act 4  Hamlet's last soliloquy & Fortinbras arrives Ophelia's songs and distraction--Branagh video-- (min. = 6 + Laertes and shower 8? min)--SONGS and MISC:  Natalie Merchant's song "Ophelia" and Moist Creature "Ophelia," Millais transparency and Indigo girls picture  Branagh video-- (min. = 5) Food for worms scene Zeffirelli video-- (min. = 5) Branagh video-- (min. = 8) Claudius and the poisoning plan If time, Act 4 discussion topics
  5. IF TIME, VIDEOS :"To Be" spin-offs: Johnny Carson's "To be," Adam Sandler's "To be," Dawson's Creek "To be"
  6. Act 4--Hamlet's last soliloquy & Fortinbras arrives--Branagh video-- (min. = 5)

  7. Act 4- Food for worms scene Zeffirelli video-- (min. = 5) Branagh video-- (min. = 8)

  8. Act 4  Act IV mad scene--Branagh video-- (min. = 6 + Laertes and shower 8? min)  and Zeffirelli Ophelia and maybe Natalie Merchant's song "Ophelia" and maybe Moist Creature "Ophelia" maybe Ophelia's songs and distraction
  9. IF TIME, VIDEOS :"To Be" spin-offs: Johnny Carson's "To be," Adam Sandler's "To be," Dawson's Creek "To be"

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

OLES:

  1. Act 4 topics

 

WALLIES ONLY:

  1. Group check-in:
  • weekend
  • words and allusion
  1. Frankenstein test review

 

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

OLES:

  1. AP Essay #3
  2. F 10-11

 

 

 

     

 

 

 ♥     ♥    ♥

  ♥  

 

Monday, April 25 day 53

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead Do 2 of the 1st 3 journal topics listed on a goldenrod sheet (click HERE if you need it)  at the end of the ivory HAMLET PACKET.  Click HERE for a copy of the ivory HAMLET PACKET.  These are OJ 16 and WA 17.  They are required! To view our AP EPHS info. page on R&G are Dead, click here: http://www.edenpr.org/ephs/arcadiaweb/Rosencrantz/play_M.html

     

    Work on Buybacks (if applicable)

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.

     (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! 

    Remember to record results in the pink chart Notes: 1.  Record your results on the yellow and pink sheets in your folder.  You must summarize these in the pink boxes and write a goal for the next paper.  Then, record your number of errors in the CLT column on the yellow technical sheet.) 2.   Be sure to follow directions! There will be a lot less "mercy" for not doing correcting the error correctly this time.   3.  YOU ARE REQUIRED TO WRITE OUT THE WHOLE SENTENCE THAT HAS THE ERROR(S).  DO NOT USE ELLIPSES!  4.  Make sure you do not make ANY NEW ERRORS.  If two or more errors occur in the same sentence, follow the specific directions on how to correct them all together.  5.   TURN BUYBACKS IN ON TIME!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  5.  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE. (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample (NOT PERFECT) of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

     

    OLES ONLY:

    1.  ASSIGNMENT H16-17:  #1. finish the play (pp. 119-144),  #2.salmon quiz,  #3. AP Q's 69-91--optional,  #4.WA 15 Act 5 topic #1 or #2.  Click HERE for a copy of the salmon Act 5 quiz.

    2. Check out the BOG PEOPLE! To see Wally's pictures and links about the BOG PEOPLE, click HERE!

      the Graubelle Man

      the Graubelle Man

        The Tollund Man

       

       

      The Olson Man

       

       

    3. FOR FUN!  CLICK below to hear an NPR interview on the "Trial of Hamlet"--

      http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=8959519

      http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=8959519  

      Hamlet on Facebook? 

      Of course, he's hip, you dig?

      http://www.angelfire.com/art2/antwerplettuce/hamlet.html

    4. EXTRA CREDIT:  Why not do some other Hamlet extra credit journals?  To see the list, click HERE.  Wally is also open to a creative topic!  Write her a proposal!

     

     

    WALLIES ONLY:

     

     

    1. Study for tomorrow's FRANKENSTEIN Final

    2. OJ 12 REACTION TO HOLLOW MEN and POETRY SELECTIONS NOTE!  For a current master list of journals, click HERE to see Wally's current list, and click HERE  to see Olson's current list.

       

       

     

     

 

Tuesday, April 26 day 54

The Lion King and Hamlet?  Oh, yeah!

 

We're food for worms, lads!

Sarah Bernhart

 

Alas, poor Yorick . . .

Gilligan's Island Hamlet!

FUN youtube LINKS APPLICABLE TO WHERE WE NOW ARE IN THE PLAY:

Laurence Olivier and the Animaniac Act 5 scene 1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSY8riXGTtU

4 min. Hamlet with Gibson and Clueless

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WKzmxjNijE

something extra:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OO2eEwoqzX4

Click here to see the Simpsons' version of Hamlet:

http://www.milkandcookies.com/link/54549/detail/

      

For more fun Shakespeare youtube links, click HERE.

Don't watch these until the end of Hamlet ACT 5

Branagh's fencing match

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=He4QwLkEuzc&feature=related 

Gilligan's Island Hamlet

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OO2eEwoqzX4

4 min. Hamlet with Gibson and Clueless

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WKzmxjNijE

Siskel and Ebert's review of Gibson in Hamlet

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g62YKoDiVGw&feature=related

Derek Jacobi directing Kenneth Branagh in "DISCOVERING HAMLET"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3q8--gFsGVU&feature=related 

Branagh discussing his Hamlet

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUqx_HKUOh4&NR=1 

PBS music video Hamlet--great

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvyQMSO7jJc&feature=related 

1 min. Hamlet

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGPes8KWE0s&feature=related

Hamlet vs. Claudius Jacobi and Branagh combined:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EYDgWC4YjdY&feature=related 

Hamlet rap--last day only!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDGRGoET5Ho&feature=related

3 min. Alan Naughton's Hamlet rap with Olivier film links--last day only!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oD0S3jq4otU&feature=related

3 min. PBS (a bit far away but audible) Alan Naughton's Hamlet rap

 

Is that Conn playing Hamlet or is he Laertes?

Michael Malone as Laertes

Today's Quote of the Day:

Sir, in my heart there was a kind of fighting,
That would not let me sleep: methought I lay
Worse than the mutines in the bilboes. Rashly,
And praised be rashness for it, let us know,
Our indiscretion sometimes serves us well,
When our deep plots do pall: and that should teach us
There's a divinity that shapes our ends,
Rough-hew them how we will,--

Act 5  Hamlet

Don't watch these until the end of Hamlet ACT 5

Branagh's fencing match

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=He4QwLkEuzc&feature=related 

Gilligan's Island Hamlet

http://youtube.com/watch?v=OO2eEwoqzX4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OO2eEwoqzX4

Simpsons Hamlet full version

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SzUGEtfZIu8&mode=related&search=

       Click here to see the Simpsons' version of Hamlet:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FtMVjQizwE

CLICK below to hear an NPR interview on the "Trial of Hamlet"

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=8959519

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=8959519

Laurence Olivier and the Animaniac Act 5 scene 1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSY8riXGTtU

4 min. Hamlet with Gibson and Clueless

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WKzmxjNijE

something extra:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OO2eEwoqzX4

Siskel and Ebert's review of Gibson in Hamlet

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g62YKoDiVGw&feature=related

Derek Jacobi directing Kenneth Branagh in "DISCOVERING HAMLET"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3q8--gFsGVU&feature=related 

Branagh discussing his Hamlet

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUqx_HKUOh4&NR=1 

PBS music video Hamlet--great

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvyQMSO7jJc&feature=related 

1 min. Hamlet

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGPes8KWE0s&feature=related

Hamlet vs. Claudius Jacobi and Branagh combined:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EYDgWC4YjdY&feature=related 

Hamlet rap--last day only!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDGRGoET5Ho&feature=related

3 min. Alan Naughton's Hamlet rap with Olivier film links--last day only!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oD0S3jq4otU&feature=related

3 min. PBS (a bit far away but audible) Alan Naughton's Hamlet rap

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzkm20h7t0Y&feature=related

Royal Shakespeare Company's 2008 production of Hamlet with David Tennant as Hamlet and Patrick Stewart as Claudius

Click HERE for more pictures!

Here are some youtube offerings from the RSC production:

video montages:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3BRJSaJSeV4&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ymh7ZOgt0HU&feature=related

David Tennant autograph signing at the RSC:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54VtbElkxr8&feature=related

Hamlet "trailer" of the RSC production:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eweyy0MnQns&feature=related

attending Hamlet RSC production

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwmM4R8PLaw&feature=related

1 min. Hamlet (supposedly)--hilarious!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IfcAuBhhld8

Laurence Olivier and the Animaniac Act 5 scene 1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSY8riXGTtU

4 min. Hamlet with Gibson and Clueless

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WKzmxjNijE

something extra:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OO2eEwoqzX4

Today's Allusion:

Kafkaesque

witch hunt

muses

Today's Words of the Day:

habiliments (Oles)

                                       heath  (Oles)

execrate (Wallies)

 scintillate (Wallies)

We're food for worms, lads!

Is that Conn playing Hamlet or is he Laertes?

CLICK below to hear an NPR interview on the "Trial of Hamlet"

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=8959519

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=8959519

For more fun Shakespeare youtube links, click HERE.

Sonnet 43  (Was it dedicated to Hamlet?)

 "How do I love thee?  Let me count the ways . . . " 

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of every day's
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with a passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints, --- I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life! --- and, if God choose,
 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzkm20h7t0Y&feature=related

Today's Allusion:

witch hunt

Today's Words of the Day:

cursory

dessicate

jejune

Today's Quote of the Day:

"We are no longer human beings.  We should be called human doings"  

~Richard Carlson in his book Don't Sweat the Small Stuff

And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count.  It's the life in your years.  ~Abraham Lincoln

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, April 26 day 54
  1. WALLIES:

    1. Group check-in:--Act 5 salmon quiz and stamp WA 15
    2. Click here to see the Simpsons' version of Hamlet:

      http://www.milkandcookies.com/link/54549/detail/

       

    3. IF TIME, VIDEOS :"To Be" spin-offs: Johnny Carson's "To be," Adam Sandler's "To be," Dawson's Creek "To be"
    4. Act 4  Act IV mad scene--Branagh video-- (min. = 6 + Laertes and shower 8? min)  and Zeffirelli Ophelia and maybe Natalie Merchant's song "Ophelia" and maybe Moist Creature "Ophelia" maybe Ophelia's songs and distraction
    5. Act V--Hamlet and Horatio address what happened on the ship

    6. ACT 5--clowns, Yorick, gravesite, (L.A. Story clip) what happened on the pirate ship, fencing match--

    7. FUN STUFF

      PBS music video Hamlet--great

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvyQMSO7jJc&feature=related 

      1 min. Hamlet

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGPes8KWE0s&feature=related Simpsons' Hamlet Olivier video--(min. = ___)

      PBS video-- (min. = ___)

      Zeffirelli video-- (min. = ___)

      Branagh video-- (min. = ___)

      Almareyda video-- (min. = ___)

      Read "I've learned slips"

    8. Hamlet on Facebook? 

      Of course, he's hip, you dig?

      http://www.angelfire.com/art2/antwerplettuce/hamlet.html

    HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

    WALLIES:

    1. Act 4 quiz
    2. Act 5 quiz
     

 

OLES ONLY:

  1. Group check-in:
  • we
  • words and allusion
  1. "Th
  2. Deb
  3. Heart of Darkness

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

OLES:

  1. all lef
  2. Stamp

 

Tuesday, April 26 day 54

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. "Walk" through the Literary Theory packet to familiarize yourself with both the packet and what literary theory entails.   NOTE: there will be a pretty hefty assignment on literary theory tomorrow night! See ahead to Wednesday's calendar if you just can't wait and want to check it out!  NOTE! If you were not in class today and did not get the packet or would like to print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.

        

      Literary Theory paper is due

    Wednesday , May 18th.  

     

  2. DUE WEDNESDAY!  Read all of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead Do 2 of the 1st 3 journal topics listed on a goldenrod sheet (click HERE if you need it)  at the end of the ivory HAMLET PACKET.  Click HERE for a copy of the ivory HAMLET PACKET.  These are OJ 16 and WA 17.  They are required! To view our AP EPHS info. page on R&G are Dead, click here: http://www.edenpr.org/ephs/arcadiaweb/Rosencrantz/play_M.html

 

WALLIES ONLY:

 

 

OJ 11 FINAL THOUGHTS ON FRANKENSTEIN (one side minimum) NOTE!  For a current master list of journals, click HERE to see Wally's current list, and click HERE  to see Olson's current list.

 

  1. HEADS UP!  Both Wallies (right away!) and
WEDNESDAY, April 27, day 55

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

Which one is which?

 

 

 

 

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

scenes from the film . . .

Newtonian Physics:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5_ayuaCzZs&feature=related

Gravity Question Court:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maI53H4Zbrs&feature=related

The funniest best of R&G:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRj_tpfrYHs&feature=fvwrel

PLAY A GAME?:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-Sx4W2cKlU&feature=related

R&G meet Hamlet:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6LO4EQcMR2Q&feature=related

There isn't any wind:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IAxeLiaHmIg&feature=related

Tom Stoppard talks with Charlie Rose:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eoSnabj-Cc4&feature=fvwrel

R & G (1990), part 1 of 14, full length movie:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDI0jIlPLGM&feature=related

Tom Roth (played Guildenstern in R&G movie--1990) interview:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vUO--q4Ys4&feature=related

 Gary Oldman (played Rosencrantz in R&G movie--1990) interview:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Wm3ihhrD7c&feature=related

Shakespeare on Film: Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead

MM's seventh week of Shakespeare on Film explores the Bard's original comedy duo


 

Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead (1990)
directed by Tom Stoppard

Tom Stoppard originally sold the screen rights to Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead, the stage comedy which made his name, soon after its 1967 premieres in the West End and on Broadway. He wrote a screenplay for MGM, then saw the project languish for twenty years until the rights were bought back and he rewrote the script and filmed it in what was then still Yugoslavia.

Film and play view the events of Hamlet entirely from the point of view of the Prince’s doomed friends as they travel to Elsinore, kick their heels ‘off stage,’ and sail to England. Tim Roth’s irritable, sarcastic Guildenstern, who’s not as clever as he thinks he is, and Gary Oldman’s garrulous, goofy Rosencrantz, who’s not as dumb as he appears, muse on why they have been summoned and how to plumb the madness of lain Glen’s mild-mannered, romantic Hamlet. Rosencrantz considers mortality in a rambling, banal equivalent of “To be, or not to be,” and keeps asking who he is, because Stoppard’s most persistent running joke—spun from the moment in Hamlet when Gertrude reverses Claudius’s “Thanks, Rosencrantz and gentle Guildenstern”—is that neither they, nor anybody else at court knows which is which.

Stoppard likened this shabby, oddly likeable pair to “a Shakespearean Laurel and Hardy or Abbott and Costello,” although their clipped, question-and-answer routines are more like the idle chatter of Vladimir and Estragon in Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot: Beautifully timed, inconsequential and better suited to stage than screen.

Conscious that theatrical dialogues might not captivate a cinema audience, Stoppard introduces and over-indulges a new gag in which Rosencrantz casually makes “scientific” discoveries, including steam power, gravity and the hamburger. Yet no matter how often he sends the pair clattering up and down flights of wooden stairs in a suspiciously deserted castle, his methods, as The Independent on Sunday noted, “still reek of the stage.”

Today's Allusion:

witch hunt

Today's Words of the Day:

mercurial

metonymy

Draconian

disdain

Today's Quotes of the Day

"Life is a gamble, at terrible odds -- if it was a bet, you wouldn't take it."   -- Tom Stoppard

and more from

Rosencrantz & Guildenstern

Rosencrantz: Life in a box is better than no life at all, I expect. You'd have a chance, at least. You could lie there thinking, "Well. At least I'm not dead.'

Rosencrantz: Whatever became of the moment when one first knew about death? There must have been one. A moment. In childhood. When it first occured to you that you don't go on forever. Must have been shattering. Stamped into one's memory. And yet, I can't remember it. It never occured to me at all. We must be born with an intuition of mortality. Before we know the word for it. Before we know that there are words. Out we come, bloodied and squawling, with the knowledge that for all the points of the compass, theres only one direction. And time is its only measure.

Rosencrantz: Shouldn't we be doing something... constructive?
Guildenstern: What did you have in mind? A short, blunt human pyramid?

Rosencrantz: Do you think Death could possibly be a boat?
Guildenstern: No, no, no... Death is "not." Death isn't. Take my meaning? Death is the ultimate negative. Not-being. You can't not be on a boat.
Rosencrantz: I've frequently not been on boats.
Guildenstern: No, no... What you've been is not on boats.

Rosencrantz: What are you playing at?
Guildenstern: Words. Words. They're all we have to go on.

Player King: Audiences know what they expect and that is all they are prepared to believe in.

Rosencrantz: Do you want to play questions?
Guildenstern: How do you play that?
Rosencrantz: You have to ask a question.
Guildenstern: Statement. One - Love.
Rosencrantz: Cheating.
Guildenstern: How?
Rosencrantz: I haven't started yet.
Guildenstern: Statement. Two - Love.
Rosencrantz: Are you counting that?
Guildenstern: What?
Rosencrantz: Are you counting that?
Guildenstern: Foul. No repetition. Three - Love and game.
Rosencrantz: I'm not going to play if you're going to be like that.

Rosencrantz: This place is a madhouse!

Guildenstern: All your life you live so close to truth it becomes a permanent blur in the corner of your eye. And when something nudges it into outline, it's like being ambushed by a grotesque.

Player: We do on stage the things that are supposed to happen off. Which is a kind of integrity, if you look on every exit being an entrance somewhere else.

Guildenstern:We cross our bridges when we come to them and burn them behind us, with nothing to show for our progress except a memory of the smell of smoke, and a presumption that once our eyes watered.

Player: You don't understand the humiliation of it-- to be tricked out of the single assumption which makes our existence viable-- that somebody is watching . . . . We're actors-- we're the opposite of people!

Eternity's a terrible thought. I mean, where's it all going to end?

Ambassador from England: The sight is dismal / And our affairs from England come too late. / The ears are senseless that should give us hearing, to tell him his commandment is fulfilled,/ That Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead.

 

WEDNESDAY, April 27, day 55
  1. Group check-in:

    • Best of the last 8 weeks
    • Reaction to R&G
    • Table topics
    • Discuss which one--R or G or the Player has the "better" approach to life
      • Flashcards--literary terms
      • share ad
      • R&G Universal Questions?  -- each group come up with one

       

     

  2. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead   Table Topics 
  3. Waiting for Godot
  4.  

  5. MORE R&G discussion
  6. Emilie & Eric read Questions Game--p. 42-44
  7. Groups do Question Game with selected refs--RULES:  no statements, no repeats, no grunts, no synonyms, no rhetoric (bombastic--Who do you think you are? too philosophical), no non sequiturs
  8. FACT and INTERPRETIVE Questions on your mind about the text--why does Stoppard include what he does in Hamlet?  What purpose do the players serve in each Act?  Difference between the characters--esp. Roz, Guild, the Player, Hamlet (new impressions?), Could they have had any other ending?
  9. If time, Universal Questions?  -- each group come up with one
  10. Coin tossing in groups--figure the odds

    Chat on coin toss probability:

    http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=jlkmyqrp9ec9s11k3n6qp1zd&page=0

  11. Initial response to R&G
  12. Why the coin toss?  Why does it turn tails when it does?
  13. show DVD--coin toss scene
  14. R&G finish FACT and INTERPRETIVE Questions on your mind about the text--why does Stoppard include what he does in Hamlet?  What purpose do the players serve in each Act?  Difference between the characters--esp. Roz, Guild, the Player, Hamlet (new impressions?), Could they have had any other ending?
  15. Universal Questions?  -- each group come up with one
  16.  

  17.  

  18.  

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

WALLIES and OLES:

  1. Wa 17 and OJ 16
WEDNESDAY, April 27, day 55

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. ASSIGNMENT  OJ #17 INTRO TO LIT. THEORY (20 pts. over a minimum of 4 sides--when you're all done with parts 1-3, this part of this OJ  will be 15 pts.  When you add the 4th part, the journal will finally be a minimum of 4 sides for 20 points)   TONIGHT YOU WILL DO PARTS 1-3 ONLY!  See below!

     Part 1 (min. 1 side): Bressler & Appleman  In your Literary Theory purple packet, read the two articles which introduce literary theory:  "Defining Criticism, Theory, and Literature" by Charles E. Bressler and "The Case for Critical Theory in the Classroom" by Deborah Appleman.  In your minimum of a one-sided journal, label each author clearly and discuss several points of interest from each article. NOTE! If you were not in class today or would like to print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.

     Part 2 (min. 1 side) Group Theory = __________ (name your assigned theory):  Read the articles about your assigned literary theory. These are assigned by LARGE GROUP COLOR GROUPS.  For the second side of this journal, give it your best effort to summarize/explain the literary theory you have been assigned.  Assume our class is your audience and that no one has read these articles.  It is your responsibility to explain the theory using only your journal to do so!  NOTE:  Plan to read your assigned articles (and reread if needed) carefully before you do the summary in your journal. Depending which article you get, this reading may be very challenging.  You will need this material for your next paper

     Reader-response:  ORANGE (Alex, Devon, Jaron, Tim, Alison N) If you were absent and need copies of the reader-response articles, click reader response.

    Formalism: GOLD 1 (Chris, Kendra, Lizzy, Megan, Alyssa, Elise, Leah) If you were absent and need copies of the formalism articles, click  formalism.  

    Reader-response: GOLD/GREEN  (Mitchell, Jenny, Peter, Pranay, Isaac)  If you were absent and need copies of the reader-response articles, click reader response.

    Gender Criticism/Feminist Theory:   TRUE BLUE  (Joe, Breanna, Lili, Alison V, Keehun, Cassie, Sarah) If you were absent and need copies of the gender criticism articles, click  feminist (gender) criticism.

    Psychoanalytic criticism:   BLUE / RED (Eric, Brandon Hill, Steph, Emily, Kathleen, Caitlin)If you were absent and need copies of the psychoanalytic articles, click psychoanalytic criticism.

    New Historicism:   BLUE COMBO (Soham, Sophia, Zach, Olivia, Lesley, Rachel, Brian) If you were absent and need copies of the new historicism articles, click new historicism.

    Deconstruction:   GREEN/RED (Petra, Ray, Brandon Harris, Emily, Lizz, Jonathan)  If you were absent and need copies of the deconstruction articles, click deconstruction.

    Marxism:   GREEN COMBOS (Michael, Yiding, Anna, June-Soo, Jason G) If you were absent and need copies of the Marxism articles, click  Marxism.

      To print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.  To read a sample paper, click HERE To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE.  To print a copy of reminders for the Lit Theory paper, click HERE.

     Part 3 (min. 1 side) Summer Novel or In-Class Work Application:   After explaining your theory, choose ONE of the summer reading novels or in-class works which you think your literary theorist would be particularly interested in analyzing.   Write up an analysis/interpretation of some parts of interest in your chosen novel through the lens of your theory.  For example, what would a feminist critic think of the confrontation of Mme. DeFarge and Miss Pross in Tale of Two Cities and why?  How would his or her feminist lens "color" the interpretation?  For example, what would a Marxist critic think of the system of determining wealth in Achebe's Things Fall Apart?

     Part 4 (min. 1 side) Marginalia, "Singing Lesson," & "Shooting and Elephant":  ( a minimum of one side)!    Read the two green articles about active reading--Moore's "How to Read" and Rosenblatt's "Life in the Margins"--which are in the lit. theory packet.  Also, read Billy Collins' poem "Marginalia."  In your OJ, jot down what you thought of these selections. 

    Now read the two stories.  Actively read the first one "Singing Lesson" but do not write on the actual story (we need these back).  Instead, either put a sheet of paper alongside the story to make a "margin" for comments or if you would like to print a copy of "The Singing Lesson" to do your ACTIVE READING, click here:   http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/SingLess.shtml            FYI! (especially if you've been assigned Marxism, Feminist/Gender Criticism,  New Historicism, or Psychoanalytic theory:  Here is some biographical information on Katharine Mansfield:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katherine_Mansfield  or  http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/kmansfi.htm        If you would like to print a copy of "Shooting an Elephant," click here: http://www.online-literature.com/orwell/887/   Remember to NOT actively read this story (if you can stand it!).  For some biographical information on Orwell, click here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Orwell

    After you have read "Shooting an Elephant" and "Singing Lesson," write up a reaction to the active reading articles, a reaction to the two stories, and then choose one of the two stories and analyze the story through the lens of your assigned theorist.  This is your final part of this journal.  It must be a minimum of 1 side of a page.

     

  2. FOR FUN:  Watch clips from the 1990 film version of R&G:

    Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

    scenes from the film . . .

    Newtonian Physics:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5_ayuaCzZs&feature=related

    Gravity Question Court:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maI53H4Zbrs&feature=related

    The funniest best of R&G:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRj_tpfrYHs&feature=fvwrel

    PLAY A GAME?:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-Sx4W2cKlU&feature=related

    R&G meet Hamlet:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6LO4EQcMR2Q&feature=related

    There isn't any wind:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IAxeLiaHmIg&feature=related

    Tom Stoppard talks with Charlie Rose:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eoSnabj-Cc4&feature=fvwrel

    R & G (1990), part 1 of 14, full length movie:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDI0jIlPLGM&feature=related

    Tom Roth (played Guildenstern in R&G movie--1990) interview:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vUO--q4Ys4&feature=related

     Gary Oldman (played Rosencrantz in R&G movie--1990) interview:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Wm3ihhrD7c&feature=related

     

  3. Work on Buybacks (if applicable)

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.

     (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! 

    Remember to record results in the pink chart Notes: 1.  Record your results on the yellow and pink sheets in your folder.  You must summarize these in the pink boxes and write a goal for the next paper.  Then, record your number of errors in the CLT column on the yellow technical sheet.) 2.   Be sure to follow directions! There will be a lot less "mercy" for not doing correcting the error correctly this time.   3.  YOU ARE REQUIRED TO WRITE OUT THE WHOLE SENTENCE THAT HAS THE ERROR(S).  DO NOT USE ELLIPSES!  4.  Make sure you do not make ANY NEW ERRORS.  If two or more errors occur in the same sentence, follow the specific directions on how to correct them all together.  5.   TURN BUYBACKS IN ON TIME!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  5.  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE. (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample (NOT PERFECT) of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

     

THURSDAY, April 28 day 56
 

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead  

LITERARY THEORY

an interesting link to feminist theory websites: 

http://vos.ucsb.edu/browse.asp?id=2828

Today's Words of the Day:

to throw down the gauntlet

Words of the Day: click HERE for copy of these definitions.

hermeneutics--the study of the methodological principles of interpretation

part of speech:  noun

adj form:  hermeneutical (interpretative)

adv. form:  hermeneutically

sentence from Bressler article in tonight's reading:  "Put another way, if there is only once correct interpretation of a text, what are the hermeneutical principles readers must use to discover this interpretation?" (p. 3)

trick:  Hermes the Greek god of invention, travel, herald, messenger of the other gods.  He brings the interpretation

etymology:  Greek, early modern English

epistemology--the study, theory or science that investigates the origin, nature and grounds of knowledge especially with reference to its limits and validity

part of speech:  noun

other forms:  epistemological, epistemologically, epistemologist

epistemic--of or relating to knowledge or knowing, cognitive

sentence from Bressler article in tonight's reading:  "Providing the academic arena in which those interested in literary theory (literary theorists) can posit philosophical assumptions concerning the nature of the reading process, the epistemological nature of learning, the nature of reality itself, and a host of related concerns, literary theory offers a variety of methodologies that enable readers to interpret a text from different and often conflicting points of view." (p. 11)

trick:  stem--knowledge is the stem

etymology:  Greek, early Modern English

 

 

 

THURSDAY, April 28 day 56

 

  1. Group check-in:
  • R&G games

  • examples of "savoir" vs. "connaitre" (lit., movies, art, music)

  • Discuss which one--R or G or the Player has the "better" approach to life
    • Flashcards--literary terms
    • share ad
    • R&G Universal Questions?  -- each group come up with one

     

  1. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead   debrief Waiting for Godot, debrief games, R&G film--heads clip, questions, garden scene, et .

  2. MORE R&G discussion
  3. Emilie & Eric read Questions Game--p. 42-44
  4. Groups do Question Game with selected refs--RULES:  no statements, no repeats, no grunts, no synonyms, no rhetoric (bombastic--Who do you think you are? too philosophical), no non sequiturs
  5. FACT and INTERPRETIVE Questions on your mind about the text--why does Stoppard include what he does in Hamlet?  What purpose do the players serve in each Act?  Difference between the characters--esp. Roz, Guild, the Player, Hamlet (new impressions?), Could they have had any other ending?
  6. If time, Universal Questions?  -- each group come up with one
  7. Coin tossing in groups--figure the odds

    Chat on coin toss probability:

    http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=jlkmyqrp9ec9s11k3n6qp1zd&page=0

  8. Initial response to R&G
  9. Why the coin toss?  Why does it turn tails when it does?
  10. show DVD--coin toss scene
  11. R&G finish FACT and INTERPRETIVE Questions on your mind about the text--why does Stoppard include what he does in Hamlet?  What purpose do the players serve in each Act?  Difference between the characters--esp. Roz, Guild, the Player, Hamlet (new impressions?), Could they have had any other ending?
  12. Universal Questions?  -- each group come up with one
  13.  

  14.  

     

  15. INTRO LIT. THEORY--
  16. ROLF-- words of the day:  hermeneutics/(hermeneutical)--the study of the methodological principles of interpretation  and epistemic/ epistemology/ epistemological (related to the cognitive knowledge.  Also--"savoir" vs. "connaitre"
  17. Rolf--Discuss Bressler article and Appleman article

    Wally--Discuss the idea of "savoir" vs. "connaitre" reading experiences.  Jot down books you have read that fit into these categories?

    show ANTZ film clip, or  Jack and Jill.  OTHER IDEAS:  "Red Riding Hood"  and the Little Freud piece to kick off unit,    "Serendipity and Lit Theory" -- Rachel Kaufman and Julia Callandar's story about Deborah Appleman, read Ada Alden's column about "Slovenly Peter "then do

  18. GROUP WORK DISCUSSION AND TRANSPARENCY--click HERE for the 2009 template

    LITERARY THEORY

    maybe Bressler's and Appleman's articles & from OJ 10: Points of interest or importance:

    maybe Savoir vs. connaitre and examples:

    PUT THE FOLLOWING ON the transparency:  Critical attributes of your group's theory:

    1. .

    2. .

    3. .

    4. .

    5. etc.

    Literary theory applied to summer novel

    Folk or fairy tales your theorist in would most likely be interested:

    Lit. theory applied to "Singing" or "Shooting"--do on Monday

HOMEWORK COLLECTED TODAY:

  1. nothing

 

 

 

 

THURSDAY, April 28 day 56

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. FANTASTIC HEATHLY FOOD FRIDAY (a.k.a. FHFF) tomorrow!  Bring something yummy!

      Hint! Hint!

     
  2. FINISH the 4th part of ASSIGNMENT  OJ #17 INTRO TO LIT. THEORY (20 pts. over a minimum of 4 sides)   NOTE! If you  would like to print out a copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet, click HERE.

     Part 4 (min. 1 side) Marginalia, "Singing Lesson," & "Shooting and Elephant":  ( a minimum of one side)!    Read the two green articles about active reading--Moore's "How to Read" and Rosenblatt's "Life in the Margins"--which are in the lit. theory packet.  Also, read Billy Collins' poem "Marginalia."  In your OJ, jot down what you thought of these selections. 

    Now read the two stories.  Actively read the first one "Singing Lesson" but do not write on the actual story (we need these back).  Instead, either put a sheet of paper alongside the story to make a "margin" for comments or if you would like to print a copy of "The Singing Lesson" to do your ACTIVE READING, click here:   http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/SingLess.shtml            FYI! (especially if you've been assigned Marxism, Feminist/Gender Criticism,  New Historicism, or Psychoanalytic theory:  Here is some biographical information on Katharine Mansfield:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katherine_Mansfield  or  http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/kmansfi.htm        If you would like to print a copy of "Shooting an Elephant," click here: http://www.online-literature.com/orwell/887/   Remember to NOT actively read this story (if you can stand it!).  For some biographical information on Orwell, click here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Orwell

    After you have read "Shooting an Elephant" and "Singing Lesson," write up a reaction to the active reading articles, a reaction to the two stories, and then choose one of the two stories and analyze the story through the lens of your assigned theorist.  This is your final part of this journal.  It must be a minimum of 1 side of a page.

     

  3. ASSIGNMENT K: #1 and #2 and #3 Critiquing Fairy Tales/The Lit. Theory Paper:                                                            #1Read "Unlearning the Myths" and jot down points of interest/reaction.  This article is included in the purple Lit. Theory packet.                                                                       #2 Next, carefully read the purple Lit. Theory Paper Packet.  Start looking for a fairy tale!  Think about whether you want to partner up with someone.  The paper is due Wednesday , May 18th.  NOTE! For a complete copy of the purple Lit. Theory packet (with the paper section at the end), click HERE.   To read a sample paper, click HERE To read a sampling of the articles available for each of the theories (you can get the rest from Wally's room in the bins), click on the theory: formalism, reader response, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist (gender) criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism.  To read the credentials of most of the authors of the Lit. Theory assigned articles, click HERE To use a template to modify to send an e-mail requesting credentials, click HERE.                                                                                             #3  Start looking for a fairy/folk tale for the paper.  Consider partnering up, too!

        

 

Friday, April 29th Day 38 

Literary Theory

Kate Mansfield

George Orwell

Wally gets her prince!!

    

Today's Allusion:

Freudian Slip

"Freudian slippers"

Today's Quotes of the Day

(all from George Orwell):

During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act.

For a creative writer possession of the "truth" is less important than emotional sincerity.

Good writing is like a windowpane.

If a man meets with injustice, it is not required that he shall not be roused to meet it; but if he is angry after he has had time to think upon it, that is sinful. The flame is not wring, but the coals are.

But if thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought

Each generation imagines itself to be more intelligent than the one that went before it, and wiser than the one that comes after it

George Orwell

More Orwellian Quotes of the Day:

A tragic situation exists precisely when virtue does not triumph but when it is still felt that man is nobler than the forces which destroy him.

All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.

At 50, everyone has the face he deserves.

Friday, April 29th Day 38

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. Group check-in:
  • weekend?

  • CHILDREN'S BOOKS! share your all-time favorite children's books and/or fairy tales--

  • Share what you know about Imperialism, George Orwell, Kate Mansfield

  1.  ALLUSION OF THE DAY--Freudian Slip--Read the Little Freud piece, too, if time.

  2. Finish transparencies adding "Singing" vs. "Shooting" stories--did you prefer one over the other? Universal Questions?  FIG Q's? Responses to Active reading vs. not active reading.  Jot down.   

    SHARE POSTERS OF THEORIES:  formalism, reader-response (read 1st page of 2 papers), psychoanalytic (first page of "Singing Lesson," "Breakdown of Family" from Chicken Soup for the Soul, read 1st page of 2 papers, feminism (read 1st page of 2 papers), new historicism, deconstruction (read 1st page of Adam Neary's paper), marxism

    1. IF TIME, Discuss Lit. Theory paper--block it out on transparency
    2. If time, Rolf does Marxist "Hansel & Gretel"--demo of lit theory paper using overhead
    3. OTHER IDEAS:  "Red Riding Hood"  and the Little Freud piece to kick off unit,    "Serendipity and Lit Theory" -- Rachel Kaufman and Julia Callandar's story about Deborah Appleman, read Ada Alden's column about "Slovenly Peter "then show ANTZ film clip..  

 

 

Friday, April 29 25th Day 38

BOTH OLES & WALLIES:

  1. AP Essay #4   You may word process the essay (double-spaced).  If you hand write it, please write legibly and do not write on the back side of the pages. The time limit is 40 min. max.  About 10 min. of that 40 min. should be spent planning the essay.  You may NOT use any outside resources.  Of course, this means you may NOT use the text.    THE PROMPT:  Choose ONE of the prompts that were discussed in class today.  Click HERE for a copy of the prompts.    You may use any works of "literary merit." Click HERE for the Literary Time Periods Time line/Works Most Frequently Appearing on the AP Open-ended Essay.

  2. LITERARY TERM CARDS: For each of the two poetry term notecards you picked today, write the definition of the term on the BACK of the card as well as 1-2 examples of the term. If you were absent, turn to the blue Poetry Packet page T-1 and choose any two terms which you do not know. For a pdf. copy of the BLUE POETRY PACKET, click HERE!

  3. WA 18 PARTNER POEMS (20 points after doing "Tips," yellow worksheets, and journaling on your assigned poem tonight and journaling on your partner's poem tomorrow night ).  1. First you will study the hand-out "Tips for writing the AP Lit. Exam" (Click HERE for a copy.) and from the blue Poetry Packet p. E5 "Perrine's  Questions about any Poem," and the salmon "How to Explicate a Poem" sheet (Click HERE for this sheet).  JOT DOWN A FEW NOTES/REMINDERS ON THE TOP OF YOUR WA18.  Label these "TIPS."                                                                        2.  Now, read the two poems you and your partner have been "assigned."  Fill out the yellow worksheet for each of the poems Click HERE for a WORD copy you can type right on.  (Each of these is worth 5 points.)  NOTE:  Friday's absentees Brandon Hill (assigned poem "Naming of Parts" in the black LBT text p. 1114), Erica Loon  (assigned poem "It is a Beauteous Evening, Calm and Free" in the black LBT text p. 590), and Pranay Rau  (assigned poem "Wirers" in the black LBT text p. 1074)are forming a group of three and need to do three sheets for each other's poems.                   3. Finally, here's what the actual journal requires:  for the poem YOU were assigned, do your best to explicate the poem's THEMES/UNIVERSAL QUESTIONS (one side minimum is required). Try to include how the poem gets at these THEMES/UNIVERSAL QUESTIONS by the use of  these relevant techniques--as defined on the "How to Explicate a Poem" sheet (Click HERE for this sheet)--SITUATION, STRUCTURE, LANGUAGE, POETIC DEVICES (Look back at the poem carefully for the use of any poetic devices that make the poem "work" and, hence, enhance the understanding/appreciation of the poem as well as lead you to believe the emotions evoked by the poem and its themes are probably what the poet intended.)  For a pdf. copy of the BLUE POETRY PACKET, click HERE!

  4. Work on Buybacks

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE.

     (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! 

    Remember to record results in the pink chart Notes: 1.  Record your results on the yellow and pink sheets in your folder.  You must summarize these in the pink boxes and write a goal for the next paper.  Then, record your number of errors in the CLT column on the yellow technical sheet.) 2.   Be sure to follow directions! There will be a lot less "mercy" for not doing correcting the error correctly this time.   3.  YOU ARE REQUIRED TO WRITE OUT THE WHOLE SENTENCE THAT HAS THE ERROR(S).  DO NOT USE ELLIPSES!  4.  Make sure you do not make ANY NEW ERRORS.  If two or more errors occur in the same sentence, follow the specific directions on how to correct them all together.  5.   TURN BUYBACKS IN ON TIME!  If buybacks are not turned in on your deadline, they are 1/2 credit the next day and no credit the day after!  5.  Read the blue BUYBACK hand-out CAREFULLY so you can ask any questions/clear up anything you don't understand about the buyback procedure. 

     If you want to print out your own copy of the BUYBACK PACKET for highlighting, active reading, etc., click HERE.  If you would like to use a template (rev. 2010) to do your buybacks, click HERE. (You can cut and paste this into a WORD DOCUMENT and make changes--add more rows or delete categories etc. to make it work for you.  Remember to print it out in landscape format!)  For a sample (NOT PERFECT) of what BUYBACKS ARE SUPPOSED TO LOOK LIKE WHEN DONE, CLICK HERE (WORD version) OR  HERE (pdf.verson)! If you would like to use the ACE template, click HERE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ONLY one term of "free" education left!

END OF QUARTER #3

SENIOR SPRING BREAK BEGINS FRIDAY!

EXTRA CREDIT OVER BREAK!  BRING HAMLET OR HEART OF DARKNESS ON SPRING BREAK!  E-mail Wally lwallenberg@edenpr.org any fun spring break pictures to put on the website after break (appropriate content, of course).  We'd love pictures of you reading Hamlet and Heart of Darkness on a cruise ship or in front of Senor Frog's or . . . 

 

  2012 OVERFLOW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FIELD TRIP PICTURES!

 

 

   

 

  1. Need something over break to read or see? Click HERE for the OLES' LIST OF "MOST IMPORTANT BOOKS and MOVIES." How about reading or watching a movie suggested by our EPHS STAFF?  Click on this link: http://www.edenpr.k12.mn.us/ephs/departments/english/favorite_books_movies.pdf

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  2. CC#3  KIDS ON A TREE (2 sider) You need a hand-out to do this CC.  Click HERE if you missed it in class.    (Designate which teacher you would like to read this one. You may indicate whether you want both teachers to read CC#3, too, or you may simply write down "EITHER" if it doesn't matter which teacher reads your CC#3.)  NOTE:  You need a special hand-out to do this journal.